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I have a set of numbers with varying precision. I need to create a hashkey out of them. This code shows that the numbers are equal (at the relevant precision). So, what is a hash function that returns equal value for equal numbers?

    int prec = 2;
    double val=12.3456;
    int digits = (int)Math.log(val);
    MathContext mc = new MathContext(digits+prec);
    BigDecimal bd = new BigDecimal(12.3020, mc);
    System.out.println("Value A:"+bd.toString());

    MathContext mcx = new MathContext(digits+prec-1);
    BigDecimal bdx = new BigDecimal(12.3170, mcx);
    System.out.println("Value A:"+bdx.toString());

    System.out.println("Difference is:"+bdx.compareTo(bd));
    System.out.println("HashCode A:"+bd.hashCode());
    System.out.println("HashCode B:"+bdx.hashCode());

BTW, BigDecimal didn't work out of the box for me, because 12.34 @ 2 precision was 12 ... I need the precision to effect everything past the decimal point. (So, is there a more appropriate library class for this?)

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2  
12.34 @ 2 precision is indeed 12, because precision counts all digits, not only the ones after the decimal point. – dasblinkenlight Jan 12 '12 at 16:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

One answer that seems to work is:

new Double(bd.doubleValue()).hashCode()

Let me know if this is somehow wrong.

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You can specify the precision for each number using Decimal Format. See this.

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If you have a minimum or valid scale for the values, then you can set the BigDecimal scale prior to taking the hashCode(), and you will get the same result. Per the BigDecimal documentation:

Scaling/rounding operations (setScale and round) ... increase or decrease the precision of the stored number with minimal effect on its value.

Here's an example:

// Setting scale to 2 will make these the equivalent
BigDecimal val1 = new BigDecimal( "1" );
BigDecimal val2 = new BigDecimal( "1.00" );
BigDecimal val3 = new BigDecimal( "1.0000" );
BigDecimal val4 = new BigDecimal( "1.0001" );
// With scale of 2 - this will be a different value
BigDecimal diffVal = new BigDecimal( "1.01" );
RoundingMode rounding = RoundingMode.HALF_EVEN;

assertEquals( val2.setScale( 2, rounding ), val1.setScale( 2, rounding ));
assertEquals( val2.setScale( 2, rounding ), val3.setScale( 2, rounding ));
assertEquals( val2.setScale( 2, rounding ), val4.setScale( 2, rounding ));
assertEquals( val2.setScale( 2, rounding ).hashCode(), val1.setScale( 2, rounding ).hashCode() );
assertEquals( val2.setScale( 2, rounding ).hashCode(), val3.setScale( 2, rounding ).hashCode() );
assertEquals( val2.setScale( 2, rounding ).hashCode(), val4.setScale( 2, rounding ).hashCode() );
assertThat( diffVal.setScale( 2, rounding ), not( equalTo( val2.setScale( 2, rounding ) )));
assertThat( diffVal.setScale( 2, rounding ).hashCode(), not( equalTo( val2.setScale( 2, rounding ).hashCode() )));
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