Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

People sometimes refer the callback pattern below being asynchronous.

function beAsync(msg, cb){
  cb(msg);
}

beAsync("a", function(msg){
  console.log(msg);
});

console.log("b");

What people sometime say is that beAsync allows for the rest of the code to run then the callback happens when it's ready.

When I call beAsync and real asynchronous functions like fs.readFile initially there must be some code that runs synchronously and then something happens that allows the code after readFile rest of the code is allowed is allowed to run.

Am I correct in saying something representing the callback enters a loop at a lower level than JavaScript?

So a revision to beAsync would include a setTimeout.

function beAsync(msg, cb){
  setTimeout( function(){ cb(msg) }, 1);
}

So setTimeout and the internals of readFile can speak to a layer which JavaScript sits on? Speaking to this lower layer is the only way to achieve non-blocking code in JavaScript?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Speaking to this lower layer is the only way to achieve non-blocking code in JavaScript?

That is kind of correct. Node is just one part of the equation. The framework itself makes heavy use of threads to manage things that can block, like IO. Look at

http://www.quora.com/How-does-IO-concurrency-work-in-node-js-despite-the-whole-app-running-in-a-single-thread

When I call beAsync and real asynchronous functions like fs.readFile initially there must be some code that runs synchronously and then something happens that allows the code after readFile rest of the code is allowed is allowed to run.

That's not very detailed, but it correct from a high level. Whenever you fire off some asynchronous work, and give the method a callback, there is work done to execute your callback with the result of the work.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok I think I've got it. In the link you've shared this answered helped clarify some things for me quora.com/… (by Andrew Jessup) –  Aaron Jan 12 '12 at 17:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.