Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have three classes (House, Room, Address) which are persistent (Mapped with JPA/Hibernate)

@Entity
@Table(name = "HOUSE")    
@AttributeOverrides({@AttributeOverride(name = "house_id", column = @Column(name =     "house_id"))})
  public class House{


     @Basic     
     private String key;
     @OneToMany(mappedBy = "house", cascade = {CascadeType.ALL},    orphanRemoval = true)
     private List<Room> rooms;

        @OneToOne(fetch = FetchType.LAZY, cascade = {CascadeType.PERSIST})
        @JoinColumn(name = "add_id")
        private Address address;
}

 public static void main(String args){
 String key="key1";
 Room room1=...
 Room room2=...
 List<Room> rooms=//add the two rooms
 .
 .
 House house= new House(key, rooms, address);

 // Here is my question.
 // Now I call the save method on the persistent class

  house.save();
}

1) Are Address and Room objects going to be persisted automatically or should I have to call save method on each of them (room1.save(), room2.save(), address.save()) before calling house.save()? How about when I delete the house obj?

2) The class "house" is the top of the hierarchy. I understood that if we call the save on the owning entity, it will persist the room and address as well. How about the reverse? If I edited the room, how do I make sure that the "house" knows about it?

share|improve this question
    
All this is well explained in the Hibernate documentation. You should read it. docs.jboss.org/hibernate/core/3.6/reference/en-US/html_single –  JB Nizet Jan 12 '12 at 17:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

not the way you have it set up. you need to mark one of your members in each entity as id with annotation @Id. Then you need to map how your composed entities relate to each other. This is done with different annotations, such as @OneToMany and @ManyToOne.

Finally, if you want to be able to persist composed entities by just calling hibernateSession.save with the owning entity in the relationship, all those entities it owns must be marked with cascade save, so that the persisting is cascaded down the ownership tree.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. I already edited my question. "Finally, if you want to be able to persist composed entities by just calling save on the owning entity in the relationship, all those entities it owns must be marked with cascade save, so that the persisting is cascaded down the ownership tree." makes sense –  WowBow Jan 12 '12 at 17:07
1  
+1. Note that save is not a method of the entity. It's a method of the Hibernate Session object, which takes an entity as parameter. The standard JPA method is persist, which behaves slightly differently. –  JB Nizet Jan 12 '12 at 17:07
    
@JBNizet thanks, i fixed my answer :) –  davogotland Jan 12 '12 at 17:43
    
I got one more thing to ask. The class "house" is the top of the hierarchy. I understood that if we call the save on the owning entity, it will persist the room and address as well. How about the reverse? If I edited the room, how do I make sure that the "house" knows about it? –  WowBow Jan 12 '12 at 18:54
1  
@MatX it mostly takes care of itself. let say you load a room object, change it, and then persists it. if you then load the house which owns that particular room, you will get the correct room in its rooms-collection. and if you load the house first, and you pick the room to edit from its rooms-collection, change it and persists it, then you already have that room in your collection. does this answer your question? –  davogotland Jan 16 '12 at 9:03

You're using annotations to provide your mapping metadata but haven't told Hibernate anything about the mapped collections. As things stand Hibernate will not persist address or rooms.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.