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I read that using raw pointers in C++ is bad. Instead we should use auto_ptr. In the below code I am populating a vector in foo() that is created in the main(). Am I doing it right or is there a better way to do without using explicit pointers.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

void foo(vector<string> *v){

    (*v).push_back(" hru");
}

int main(){
    vector<string> v;
    v.push_back("hi");
    foo(&v);
    for(int i=0;i<v.size(); i++){
        cout << v[i];
    }

}
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1  
auto_ptr is usually not what you want. –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 12 '12 at 16:51
2  
@OliCharlesworth Actually, unless you have the newer unique_ptr, auto_ptr is the most useful of the commonly available smart pointers. (Although in his case, he should be using references, and not pointers.) –  James Kanze Jan 12 '12 at 16:57
1  
Don't use raw pointers for managing objects' lifetimes, or for referring to objects whose lifetime you don't know. In this case, v is automatically managed, and guaranteed to remain valid throughout the pointer's lifetime, so there's no problem with using a pointer. Whether to replace it with a reference is a matter of personal taste. –  Mike Seymour Jan 12 '12 at 16:59
2  
The reason raw pointers are "bad" is because raw pointers lack intrinsic semantics: the pointer itself never knows who is responsible for what it's pointing at, or whether it's pointing at something useful at all. References don't have this problem since it's clear that they only refer to something without being responsible for it, and smart pointers have well defined ownership semantics. –  Kerrek SB Jan 12 '12 at 17:06
1  
@sbi The problem with people coming from Java is that they dynamically allocate things they shouldn't; the answer to that isn't smart pointers, but to not allocate dynamically. For the things you should allocate dynamically in C++, shared_ptr often creates more problems than it solves. –  James Kanze Jan 12 '12 at 20:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

C++ uses references for what you are trying to do:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

void foo(vector<string>& v){
    v.push_back(" hru");
}

int main(){
    vector<string> v;
    v.push_back("hi");
    foo(v);
    for(int i=0;i<v.size(); i++){
        cout << v[i];
    }
}

References and pointers are similar, with one very important distinction: there is no such thing as a null reference (Constructing one is Undefined Behavior in C++ you can construct one, but doing so is considered a hack).

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1  
In reference to your "you can construct one": C++ has no such thing as a null reference and creating one is undefined behaviour. –  Tony The Lion Jan 12 '12 at 16:58
    
@TonyTheLion That's more or less what I said, except I used a popular synonym for "undefined behaviour" :) –  dasblinkenlight Jan 12 '12 at 17:00
    
oh, I see. So I guess "a hack" is another way of saying UB. TIL –  Tony The Lion Jan 12 '12 at 17:02
1  
I agree with @TonyTheLion. You might accidentally get a null reference, but trying to construct one is completely idiotic because of the undefined behavior; I wouldn't grace it with the term "hack". See stackoverflow.com/a/57656/5987 –  Mark Ransom Jan 12 '12 at 17:07
    
@MarkRansom I guess you are right: "hack" is not universally regarded as a pejorative, so I edited the answer. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 12 '12 at 17:14

In C++ you can avoid the pointer and use a pass-by-reference:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

void foo(vector<string>& v){

    v.push_back(" hru");
}

int main(){
    vector<string> v;
    v.push_back("hi");
    foo(v);
    for(int i=0;i<v.size(); i++){
        cout << v[i];
    }    
}
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You can begin to think about using auto_ptr when you deal with objects created on heap (e.g. a class instance created by "new"). Your vector holds its elements by value, std::string elements it is. So you don't need to consider auto_ptr here at all. If your vector would hold instances created on heap then you could use something like this:

std::vector< auto_ptr< MyType > > vec;

auto_ptr< MyType > a( new MyType() );

vec.push_back( a );

and then when your vector elements get erased by e.g. your vec leaving its scope then instance 'a' will get deleted automatically.

With other words, auto_ptr is a kind of garbage collector which does a kind of automatic object deletion for you. See here for more information about auto_ptr http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/std/memory/auto_ptr

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std::auto_ptr in a std::vector is never a good idea. If you need this type of functionality you should use a boost::ptr_vector instead. –  mocj Jan 12 '12 at 18:00
1  
@boto: Thanks for the answer. I think it is a bad idea to do that. I found some question related to this stackoverflow.com/questions/4577838/… –  Naresh Jan 12 '12 at 18:07
    
Right, I would never use auto_ptr as a smart pointer, because it simply is not a smart pointer. But they do a good job for temporary holding objects in a limited scope and not worrying about deleting them. –  boto Jan 13 '12 at 13:58

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