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First off, I'm not a math guy, so large number precision rarely filters into my daily work. Please be gentle. ;)

Using NumPy to generate a matrix with values equally divided from 1:

>>> m = numpy.matrix([(1.0 / 1000) for x in xrange(1000)]).T
>>> m
matrix[[ 0.001 ],
       [ 0.001 ],
       ...
       [ 0.001 ]])

On 64-bit Windows with Python 2.6, summing rarely works out to 1.0. math.fsum() does with this matrix, it doesn't if I change the matrix to use smaller numbers.

>>> numpy.sum(m)
1.0000000000000007
>>> math.fsum(m)
1.0
>>> sum(m)
matrix([[ 1.]])
>>> float(sum(m))
1.0000000000000007

On 32-bit Linux (Ubuntu) with Python 2.6, summing always works out to 1.0.

>>> numpy.sum(m)
1.0
>>> math.fsum(m)
1.0
>>> sum(m)
matrix([[ 1.]])
>>> float(sum(m))
1.0000000000000007

I can add an epsilon to my code when assessing if the matrix sums to 1 (e.g. -epsilon < sum(m) < +epsilon) but I want to first understand what the cause of the difference is within Python, and if there's a better way to determine the sum correctly.

My understanding is that the sum(s) are processing the machine representation of the numbers (floats) differently than how they're displayed, and when sum'ing, the internal repesentation is used. Howeve,r looking at the 3 methods I used to calculate the sum it's not clear why they're all different, or the same between the platforms.

What's the best way to correctly calculate the sum of a matrix?

If you're looking for a more interesting matrix, this simple change will have smaller matrix numbers:

>>> m = numpy.matrix([(1.0 / 999) for x in xrange(999)]).T

Thanks in advance for any help!

Update I think I figured something out. If I correct the value being stored to a 32-bit float the results match the 32-bit Linux sum'ing.

>>> m = numpy.matrix([(numpy.float32(1.0) / 1000) for x in xrange(1000)]).T
>>> m
matrix[[ 0.001 ],
       [ 0.001 ],
       ...
       [ 0.001 ]])
>>> numpy.sum(m)
1.0

This will set the matrix machine numbers to represent 32-bit floats, not 64-bit on my Windows test, and will sum correctly. Why is a 0.001 float not equal as a machine number on a 32-bit and 64-bit system? I would expect them to be different if I was trying to store very small numbers with lots of decimal places.

Does anyone have any thoughts on this? Should I explicitly switch to 32-bit floats in this case, or is there a 64-bit sum'ing method? Or am I back to adding an epsilon? Sorry if I sound dumb, I'm interested in opinions. Thanks!

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3  
You must use an epsilon, since you must never compare floating-point numbers for exact equality. Especially numbers that you know are the results of arithmetic, as opposed to e.g. constants or configuration values, for instance. –  unwind Jan 12 '12 at 16:55
    
@unwind: never say never. Exact equality tests are sometimes both appropriate and necessary in floating-point. This is not one of those cases, however. –  Stephen Canon Jan 12 '12 at 16:57
    
You might want to read about how floating point numbers work. It's useful to know when doing anything with them. –  murgatroid99 Jan 12 '12 at 17:03
    
It's not float point numbers I had a problem with, it was how the machine stores the number, and how or what it's representation should be used when sum'ing a matrix. (Maybe I do have a problem with float points)) I asked in case there's some knowledge out there on NumPy, matrix and sum that I didn't grasp yet. –  garlicman Jan 12 '12 at 17:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's because you're comparing 32-bit floats to 64-bit floats, as you've already found out.

If you specify a 32-bit or 64-bit dtype on both machines, you'll see the same result.

Numpy's default floating point dtype (the numerical type for a numpy array) is the same as the machine precision. This is why you're seeing different results on different machines.

E.g. The 32-bit version:

m = numpy.ones(1000, dtype=numpy.float32) / 1000
print repr(m.sum())

and the 64-bit version:

m = numpy.ones(1000, dtype=numpy.float64) / 1000
print repr(m.sum())

Will be different due to the differing precision, but you'll see the same results on different machines. (However, the 64-bit operation will be much slower on a 32-bit machine)

If you just specify numpy.float, this will be either a float32 or a float64 depending on the machine's native architecture.

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First, if you use numpy to store values, you should use numpy's methods, if provided, to work with the array/matrix. That is, if you want to trust the extremely capable people that have put numpy together.

Now, the 64-bit answer of numpy's sum() can not sum up to exactly 1 for the reasons how floating point numbers are being handled in computers (murgatroid99 provided you with a link, there are hundred's more out there). Therefore, the only safe way, (and even very helpful in understanding your mathematical treatment of your code much better, and therefore your problem per se) is to use an epsilon value to cut off at a certain precision.

Why do I think it is helpful? Because computational science needs to deal with errors as much as experimental science does and by deliberately dealing (meaning: determining them) with errors at this place, you already have done the first step in dealing with the computational errors of your code.

So, there maybe other ways to deal with it, but most of the time, I would use an epsilon to determine the precision I require for a given problem.

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I'd say that the most accurate way (not the most efficient) is to use the decimal module:

>>> from decimal import Decimal
>>> m = numpy.matrix([(Decimal(1) / 1000) for x in xrange(1000)])
>>> numpy.sum(m)
Decimal('1.000')
>>> numpy.sum(m) == 1.0
True
share|improve this answer
    
This will do it too. Man this just makes me want to change my question. Decimal should represent the value precicely. But between 32-bit and 64-bit floats, why is a 0.001 float not being represented equally as a machine number? –  garlicman Jan 12 '12 at 17:14
    
Oh and I agree, decimal is not efficent. I would switch to an epsilon before using decimal, but thank you for the suggestion! –  garlicman Jan 12 '12 at 17:18
    
For more information about floating point arithmetic in python, you may want to have a look here. –  jcollado Jan 12 '12 at 17:30

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