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I have a database/table in SQLITE using the following structure

CREATE TABLE milestones ( 
    ID       INT( 10 )        NOT NULL,
    Title    VARCHAR( 50 )    DEFAULT NULL,
    mYear    INT( 11 )        NOT NULL,
    mMonth   INT( 11 )        DEFAULT NULL,
    mDay     INT( 11 )    DEFAULT NULL,
    mText    VARCHAR( 2000 )  NOT NULL,
    Theme1   VARCHAR( 50 )    DEFAULT NULL,
    Theme2   VARCHAR( 50 )    DEFAULT NULL,
    ImageURL VARCHAR( 50 )    DEFAULT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY ( ID ) 
);

I am using the following query to get the 5 nearest dates in relationship to today's date.

SELECT dtable.ID, dtable.Date 
FROM(SELECT ID, date(mYear||'-'||mMonth||'-'||mDay) as Date 
FROM milestones
WHERE mMonth IS NOT NULL AND mDay IS NOT NULL AND mMonth ="+varMonth+")AS dtable
ORDER BY ABS("+varDay+"-date(dtable.Date, '%d'))
LIMIT 5;

The problems using this query is that I am only getting records with the date format yyyy-mm-dd. If there is any record with 1 digit month or day ( the format yyyy-m-d or yyyy-mm-d or yyyy-m-dd) it doesn't show in the result.

How can I solve this problem without changing the datatype of mMonth or mDay?

share|improve this question
    
Why dont you do this in Javascript? –  Toby Allen Jan 12 '12 at 17:01
    
How, That is my question! –  locorecto Jan 12 '12 at 17:04
    
Your question is how to do it in SQL I'm saying you should do it in Javascript –  Toby Allen Jan 12 '12 at 17:06
    
@Toby: the obvious reason not to do it in Javascript is that you would have to download the whole table into javascript to do the comparisons... –  Chris Jan 12 '12 at 17:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want to pad a string with zeros to be sure it is 2-char wide, you can use this simple dirty trick with the few SQLite builtin available functions:

SUBSTR('00'||month,-2)
share|improve this answer
    
This solve the problem of the 2 digits format. However, It is not sorting the way I want it to sort. IS THIS the right way to get the day number from a date date(dtable.Date, '%d') –  locorecto Jan 12 '12 at 17:36
    
I found the way to do this: strftime('%d', dtable.Date) –  locorecto Jan 12 '12 at 17:52

I think a potential reason you are not getting matches for single digit months is because your +varMonth+ itself is formatted to be "04" for example. You are likely treating them as strings and there is an implicit (string)int cast happening so "4"="04" does not match. Not sure why that would also effect +varDay+ though because I would assume for the subtraction its being cast back to an int, so something like (int)((string)int) is happening.

Could you rule this out?

Also I see a flaw here that the 'nearest 5 dates' is limited to the current month, so the if today was the first/last day of the month you would still only get results in the current month.

Try this query:

SELECT dtable.ID, dtable.Date  
FROM (SELECT ID, date(mYear||'-'||mMonth||'-'||mDay) as Date  
FROM milestones WHERE mMonth IS NOT NULL AND mDay IS NOT NULL) AS dtable 
ORDER BY ABS(date("+varYear+"||'-'||"+varMonth+"||'-'||"+varDay+") - dtable.Date) ASC  
LIMIT 5;
share|improve this answer
    
"Also I see a flaw here that the 'nearest 5 dates' is limited to the current month, so the if today was the first/last day of the month you would still only get results in the current month." I am aware of this and this is fine for my purpose. –  locorecto Jan 12 '12 at 17:18
    
ah ok, so its intended to be 'nearest 5 dates within the given month', in that case you can put the AND mMonth="+varMonth+" back in. –  Xeno Jan 12 '12 at 17:23
    
"your +varMonth+ itself is formatted to be "04""I still think that is not the problem. I am using specific numbers in place of the +varMonth+ and still get the same result. –  locorecto Jan 12 '12 at 17:27

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