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first off this is a class assignment so i would appreciate help but just hints as i want to learn. I have to calculate monthly payment based off of interest rate etc as seen in my code but something is off with my calculation. My output reads nan which i believe is not a number. I have been trying to figure out where i am going wrong to no avail,any suggestions on how to correct this issue? Thanks in advance.

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    //collect payment info
    double loanAmount = 0; 
    double anualRate = 0;
    double monthlyIntRate = 0; 
    int numOfPayment = 0; 
    double monthlyPayment = 0; 
    double amountPaidBack = 0; 
    double interestPaid = 0;

    cout << "Enter loan amount: ";
    cin >> loanAmount;
    cout << "Enter Anual Interest Rate: ";
    cin >> anualRate;
    cout << "Enter Payments made: ";
    cin >> numOfPayment;

    //calculate montly payment
    monthlyPayment = (loanAmount * pow(monthlyIntRate + 1, numOfPayment) * monthlyIntRate) / ( pow(monthlyIntRate + 1, numOfPayment) - 1);                                                    

    //calculate amount paid back
    amountPaidBack = monthlyPayment * numOfPayment;

    //calculate interest paid
    monthlyIntRate = anualRate / 12;
    interestPaid = monthlyIntRate * numOfPayment;

    //split input from calculated output
    cout << "-----------------------------\n" << endl;

    //Display the calulated data
    cout << fixed;
    cout << setprecision(2);

    cout << "Loan Amount: " << setw(15) << "$ "<< right << loanAmount << endl;

    cout << "Monthly Interest Rate: " << setw(14) << monthlyIntRate << "%" << endl;

    cout << "Number of Payments: " << setw(17) << numOfPayment << endl;

    cout << "Montly Payment: " << setw(19) << "$ " << monthlyPayment << endl;

    cout << "Amount Paid Back: " << setw(17) << "$ " << amountPaidBack << endl;

    cout << "Interest Paid: " << setw(18) << "$ " << interestPaid << endl;

    return 0;

Output:

Loan Amount:              $ 100000.00
Monthly Interest Rate:           1.00%
Number of Payments:                36
Montly Payment:                  $ nan
Amount Paid Back:                $ nan
Interest Paid:                 $ 36.00
share|improve this question
4  
Do you know how to use a debugger? You should step through the code to find out which calculations are producing nans. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 12 '12 at 17:34
1  
Tried using a debugger yet to step through the code and examine the values of your variables at each step? – suszterpatt Jan 12 '12 at 17:35
2  
nan is indeed not a number. Why not print out (cout) the various parts of the calculation for monthly payments to find out where the calculation is going ary. – Ed Heal Jan 12 '12 at 17:36
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're dividing by zero. it occurs in this line:

monthlyPayment = (loanAmount * pow(monthlyIntRate + 1, numOfPayment) * monthlyIntRate) / ( pow(monthlyIntRate + 1, numOfPayment) - 1);

The value stored in monthlyIntRate is zero, so pow(monthlyIntRate + 1, numOfPayment) eqauls to (0 + 1) ^ numOfPayment, which is 1. So, pow(monthlyIntRate + 1, numOfPayment) - 1) is 0.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote, this is correct. The divisor of the expression that is assigned to monthlyPayment evaluates as zero, resulting in nan. – thasc Jan 12 '12 at 17:37
2  
monthlyIntRate is being computed after monthlyPayment. At the time of computation of monthlyPayment, monthlyIntRate is 0. – Divya Jan 12 '12 at 17:38
1  
Looking at it in the debugger the statement basically becomes monthlyPayment = (100000 * pow(1, 36) * 0) / (pow(0+1, 36) - 1) simplified monthlyPayment = (0 / 0) – r_ahlskog Jan 12 '12 at 18:01
1  
I would guess having random value of the variable would still produce faulty results most of the time, by initializing it to zero you at least get consistency. Which is helpful when debugging – r_ahlskog Jan 12 '12 at 20:21
1  
Gmenfan83: I'd venture that if a variable should be assigned to at some point before being used, but isn't, then this fault would be made much more obvious if the variable isn't initialised by default, since you'd get different - and crazy - results every time. – thasc Jan 12 '12 at 20:34

As @FlopCoder mentioned, by the time monthlyPayment is calculated, monthlyIntRate == 0. So the divisor of the fraction

monthlyPayment = (loanAmount * pow(monthlyIntRate + 1, numOfPayment) * monthlyIntRate) / ( pow(monthlyIntRate + 1, numOfPayment) - 1);

is 0.

But it is not enough to get nan. If dividend is not 0 also, you would get inf. But it is 0 in your case, too. Then, you get nan.

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The various powers are leading to very large numbers. I would simply the equation by using algerbra:

monthlyPayment = (loanAmount * pow(monthlyIntRate + 1, numOfPayment) * monthlyIntRate) / ( pow(monthlyIntRate + 1, numOfPayment) - 1);                                                     
share|improve this answer

You do this assignment: monthlyIntRate = anualRate / 12 after you use it in the monthly payment calculation. Thus the monthly interest rate used is 0.0 and you get a divide by zero resulting in a NaN output. If you move it before then it all works.

Note that your style of declaring all variables at the top of the function is very C-esque and not favored in C++. If you always declare and initialize your variables as close to the point of use as possible these sorts of errors become much easier to spot. Anytime you can declare and initialize a variable at the same point is one less place you could accidentally use it before it gets a real value.

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