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I am watching the Stanford University iPad and iPhone application Developments course video. The instructor says in the video we can control-drag an UI object to the implementation files to create an action. But in this way the method will not declare in the header file. Does this mean it is ok to implement methods in the .m file but not declare in the .h file?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Depends on how you define "ok" :-)

Objective-C uses dynamic method lookup and does not really enforce access ("private", "public", etc.) specifiers. So you don't need to declare any method in a header file.

However you will end up fighting the compiler as it does do a fair amount of type-checking unless you persuade it not to, and you'll lose by doing so.

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You are not required to declare in the header file all methods in the implementation. But if not in the header file obviously you cannot reference them by literal name in another file, nor can you "forward reference" them in the implementation file.

(Note that this is not that different from regular C, but is different from methods of a class in C++.)

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The behavior of the compiler seems to have changed somewhat in Xcode 4.5. I have a bunch of methods that I did not declare in the .h and I get no compiler errors. However, when I take this code into Xcode 4.2 so I can check for compatibility with iOS 4.3 the compiler throws errors. –  JScarry Dec 13 '12 at 19:56
    
@JScarry - I've noticed similar behavior, though it seems to vary with some sort of compiler flag. But Xcode 4.5 is pushing the use of a () version of the @interface in the .m, and you can stick all the internal declarations there. –  Hot Licks Dec 13 '12 at 19:59

It's "OK" to not declare methods in the header yes, under certain circumstances. For instance, if using ARC then the compiler generally needs to know the method signature so it can do the right thing. But basically all it means is that wherever you're using the method, it must already know about the method you're calling.

Since you're talking about Interface Builder, that's slightly different in that it will know about all methods since it can "see" the whole context of your header and implementation files and know that a method exists. i.e. in my terminology above, the method has been defined before it's used.

With regard to defining before use, the general accepted approach is to either:

  1. Define a method in the interface file (.h). e.g.:

    MyClass.h

    @interface MyClass : NSObject
    - (void)someMethod;
    @end
    

    MyClass.m

    @implementation MyClass
    - (void)someMethod {
        // do something
    }
    @end
    
  2. Define a method in a class continuation category. e.g.:

    MyClass.h

    @interface MyClass : NSObject
    @end
    

    MyClass.m

    @interface MyClass ()
    - (void)someMethod;
    @end
    
    @implementation MyClass
    - (void)someMethod {
        // do something
    }
    @end
    
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