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I have a problem similar to the one I posted here:

Comparing two columns: logical- is value from column 1 also in column 2?

However, the data are in a slightly different format. The general data structure is a list in one column of photos taken over a 3 day period, and another column of photos that match the photos in column 1. The other information is what day the photo was taken, such that individuals from each day are mutually exclusive- there is no more than one photo per day of a particular individual (i.e. "A" will never match "B" in my example below because they are both from day 1).

photo <- c('A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','K','L')
day <- c(1,1,1,1,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,3)
matching_photo <- c(NA,NA,NA,NA,NA,'A','B','E',NA,NA,'F','A','C')
DF <- data.frame(photo,day,matching_photo)

The data output I am looking for is this:

serial.no <- c(1,2,3,4,5,6)
individuals <- c('A,F,K','B,G','C,L','D','E,H','I')
histories <- c('111','110','101','100','011','001')
finalDF <- data.frame(individuals,histories)

Which includes a serial number to identify the individual (made up as I go, so just starting with a sequential series from 1), the list of photos that correspond to each individual in a column, and the histories. The histories follow a binary format such that if you were observed on day 1, and not again until day 3, your history would be "101". But if you were only observed on day two, your history would be "010."

One of the problems I'm having with this particular data set (compared to the problem linked above) is that if an individual is seen 3 days in a row, there are two records for that individual in the photo column ("K" in my example above), matching photos from both prior days ("A" and "F"). I appreciate any help provided. Thank you!

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Some friendly advice: you've asked several questions now that have received some useful answers (at least, that's what your comments indicate!). It would be very helpful to others using this site if you mark an answer as Accepted (click the check mark next to them) if it solved your problem. That way others viewing you question will know which answer solved your problem. (It is also generally consider the polite thing to do here.) –  joran Jan 12 '12 at 18:10
    
Sorry I'll go do that. I did not realize that! Done. Took me a minute to find the little check mark. Thanks. –  Nate Jan 12 '12 at 18:11
    
No problem, Nate! And please do remember that we only mentioned it because you had indicated that some of those answers helped you. Accepting an answer is your choice; if none of the answers help, don't feel bad about not accepting. –  joran Jan 12 '12 at 18:16
    
Got it. I've always received good answers here! –  Nate Jan 12 '12 at 18:17
    
What @joran said: no problem at all, and don't feel any compulsion to accept when you don't get an answer that works. I knew you simply didn't know -- heck, you had even included a thanks-in-advance at the bottom of this question, and (even nicer), have posted reproducible data! Cheers for that! –  Josh O'Brien Jan 12 '12 at 18:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The tricky part here is to find those groups of photos that are all of the same individual. If the animal in photo A matches that in photo G, and photo L is a match for photo G, you need an algorithm that will recognize photos A, G, and L as all being linked.

This is a classic problem in the analysis of networks, so I turned to the igraph package, which calls itself a package for "network analysis and visualization". It includes a function clusters(), which will pull out linked clusters from "adjacency matrices", matrices that encode connections between nodes, and that look like this:

 [1,] 1 . . . . . . . . . . .
 [2,] . 1 . . . . . . . . . .
 [3,] . . 1 . . . . . . . . .
 [4,] . . . 1 . . . . . . . .
 [5,] . . . . 1 . . . . . . .
 [6,] 1 . . . . 1 . . . . . .
 [7,] . 1 . . . . 1 . . . . .
 [8,] . . . . 1 . . 1 . . . .
 [9,] . . . . . . . . 1 . . .
[10,] . . . . . . . . . 1 . .
[11,] 1 . . . . 1 . . . . 1 .
[12,] . . 1 . . . . . . . . 1

The matrix above is the adjacency matrix for your data. The 12 rows and columns represent the 12 photos, A-L. Photos that are of the same animal are marked with 1's. The other cells are marked with dots rather than 0's, because this is actually a special representation, designed for sparse matrices, and provided by the Matrix package. (I chose that representation in case you have a huge dataset: nlarge photos will produce a matrix with nlarge^2 cells, which might swamp your computer's memory.)

In the code below, the first chunk constructs the adjacency matrix, the second pulls out the clusters of photos for each animal, and the third chunk puts the results back together in the form you've asked for.

library(Matrix)
library(igraph)

# Construct an adjacency matrix, in which pairs of photos of the same  
# individual are encoded with 1's
photos <- as.character(unique(DF$photo))
n <- length(photos)
pairs <- subset(DF, !is.na(matching_photo), 
                select = c("photo", "matching_photo"))
pairs[] <- lapply(pairs, FUN=function(X) match(X, photos))
M <- 1 * with(pairs, sparseMatrix(i = c(seq_len(n), photo), 
                                  j = c(seq_len(n), matching_photo)))

# Extract vectors of photos of the same individual
(clust <- clusters(graph.adjacency(adjmatrix=M)))
# $membership
#  [1] 0 1 2 3 4 0 1 4 5 6 0 2
# $csize
# [1] 3 2 2 1 2 1 1
# $no
# [1] 7

# Process results of clustering to construct output data.frame
DF2 <- cbind(individual = clust$membership, 
             subset(DF, !duplicated(photo), select=c("photo", "day")))
grps <- tapply(DF2$photo, DF2$individual, paste, collapse=",")
days <- tapply(DF2$day, DF2$individual, 
               FUN=function(X) paste((1 * unique(DF$day) %in% X), collapse=""))
data.frame(individual = as.numeric(names(grps)), photos = grps, days=days)
#   individual photos days
# 0          0  A,F,K  111
# 1          1    B,G  110
# 2          2    C,L  101
# 3          3      D  100
# 4          4    E,H  011
# 5          5      I  001
# 6          6      J  001
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. I just tried this- got an error on this line "M <- 1 * with(pairs2, sparseMatrix(i = c(seq_len(n), photo)," is pairs2 supposed to be "pairs"? It appears to work if I make that edit. I'm going to try it on my real data now. I'll report back. Thank you. –  Nate Jan 12 '12 at 22:34
    
Thanks for catching that. I've just now edited it. –  Josh O'Brien Jan 12 '12 at 22:48
    
Well I've mucked around with this for awhile now and for some strange reason I cannot get it to work on my real data. I'm hoping I didn't overlook something, but I've been pouring over this thing. The error I get is for the sparseMatrix line. It says "NA's in (i,j) are not allowed." Comparing the example data, there are NA's in the j, but it works and doesn't throw that error. What else could it mean? I've tried making sure my DF is split into different objects and that they are in character format, but that didn't help. The pairs steps all seem to work fine... Any tips? –  Nate Jan 13 '12 at 2:14
    
Seems like there IS something wrong with the pairs file. It has an NA. I haven't figured out exactly how this is being generated though. The data looks right. I shall report back later. –  Nate Jan 13 '12 at 2:27
    
Ok I figured it out. There was a single missing photo from the unique column due to an oversight when massaging the data! Par for the course. –  Nate Jan 13 '12 at 2:49

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