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According to the docs, super(cls, obj) returns

a proxy object that delegates method calls to a parent or sibling class of type cls

I understand why super() offers this functionality, but I need something slightly different: I need to create a proxy object that delegates methods calls (and attribute lookups) to class cls itself; and as in super, if cls doesn't implement the method/attribute, my proxy should continue looking in the MRO order (of the new not the original class). Is there any function I can write that achieves that?

Example:

class X:
  def act():
    #...

class Y:
  def act():
    #...

class A(X, Y):
  def act():
    #...

class B(X, Y):
  def act():
    #...

class C(A, B):
  def act():
    #...

c = C()
b = some_magic_function(B, c)
# `b` needs to delegate calls to `act` to B, and look up attribute `s` in B
# I will pass `b` somewhere else, and have no control over it

Of course, I could do b = super(A, c), but that relies on knowing the exact class hierarchy and the fact that B follows A in the MRO. It would silently break if any of these two assumptions change in the future. (Note that super doesn't make any such assumptions!)

If I just needed to call b.act(), I could use B.act(c). But I am passing b to someone else, and have no idea what they'll do with it. I need to make sure it doesn't betray me and start acting like an instance of class C at some point.

A separate question, the documentation for super() (in Python 3.2) only talks about its method delegation, and does not clarify that attribute lookups for the proxy are also performed the same way. Is it an accidental omission?

EDIT

The updated Delegate approach works in the following example as well:

class A:
    def f(self):
        print('A.f')
    def h(self):
        print('A.h')
        self.f()

class B(A):
    def g(self):
        self.f()
        print('B.g')
    def f(self):
        print('B.f')
    def t(self):
        super().h()


a_true = A()
# instance of A ends up executing A.f
a_true.h()

b = B()
a_proxy = Delegate(A, b)
# *unlike* super(), the updated `Delegate` implementation would call A.f, not B.f
a_proxy.h()

Note that the updated class Delegate is closer to what I want than super() for two reasons:

  1. super() only does it proxying for the first call; subsequent calls will happen as normal, since by then the object is used, not its proxy.

  2. super() does not allow attribute access.

Thus, my question as asked has a (nearly) perfect answer in Python.

It turns out that, at a higher level, I was trying to do something I shouldn't (see my comments here).

share|improve this question
    
You can't make sure it doesn't act like an instance of class C, because that's what it is. If you really, seriously want an instance of B(), I recommend you simply make an instance of B with the attributes needed. You can copy them from C. –  Lennart Regebro Jan 12 '12 at 19:54
    
@LennartRegebro: well, I didn't require that b is an instance of class C, and in fact it's not; it is an instance of a completely different class (class Delegate in case of Sven's solution, class super in case of built-in super(), and so on). That aside, you may be right that b can't be prevented from betraying its ability to (indirectly) access class C instance methods and attributes. If so, can you give an example of how Sven's Delegate(B, c) would act as an instance of class C? –  max Jan 12 '12 at 21:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This class should cover the most common cases:

class Delegate:
    def __init__(self, cls, obj):
        self._delegate_cls = cls
        self._delegate_obj = obj
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        x = getattr(self._delegate_cls, name)
        if hasattr(x, "__get__"):
            return x.__get__(self._delegate_obj)
        return x

Use it like this:

b = Delegate(B, c)

(with the names from your example code.)

Restrictions:

  1. You cannot retrieve some special attributes like __class__ etc. from the class you pass in the constructor via this proxy. (This restistions also applies to super.)

  2. This might behave weired if the attribute you want to retrieve is some weired kind of descriptor.

Edit: If you want the code in the update to your question to work as desired, you can use the foloowing code:

class Delegate:
    def __init__(self, cls):
        self._delegate_cls = cls
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        x = getattr(self._delegate_cls, name)
        if hasattr(x, "__get__"):
            return x.__get__(self)
        return x

This passes the proxy object as self parameter to any called method, and it doesn't need the original object at all, hence I deleted it from the constructor.

If you also want instance attributes to be accessible you can use this version:

class Delegate:
    def __init__(self, cls, obj):
        self._delegate_cls = cls
        self._delegate_obj = obj
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        if name in vars(self._delegate_obj):
            return getattr(self._delegate_obj, name)
        x = getattr(self._delegate_cls, name)
        if hasattr(x, "__get__"):
            return x.__get__(self)
        return x
share|improve this answer
    
I just updated the question, since it turns out I actually pass b to someone else. This means that my functools solution no longer works. It seems that what you're doing precisely meets my needs, let me just test it a bit. I assume I just say b = Delegate(B, c)? –  max Jan 12 '12 at 18:38
    
This doesn't behave like super in the presence of multiple inheritance. It delegates to the MRO of _delegate_cls, regardless of where it sits in the full MRO of _delegate_obj. In fact it delegates to _delegate_cls regardless of whether it's even in the full MRO of _delegate_obj, which is interesting. :) But given that the OP explicitly talked about multiple inheritance and MROs, that may not be desired. It also doesn't support attribute lookup at all (neither does super mind you). –  Ben Jan 16 '12 at 23:08
    
Ah yeah, we'd need to check cls is in the MRO, and also if method not found in cls, start the search from next class in MRO AFTER cls –  max Jan 16 '12 at 23:18
    
@Ben: I'm not sure if it really would be desired to use the MRO of the original object. –  Sven Marnach Jan 17 '12 at 0:16
1  
@Max: Delegate uses getattr() to look up an attribute in cls. This automatically means that all base classes of cls are also searched. As Ben remarked, this is different from the clases that come after cls in the MRO of the original object, but I'm not sure this is what you really want. –  Sven Marnach Jan 17 '12 at 0:19

A separate question, the documentation for super() (in Python 3.2) only talks about its method delegation, and does not clarify that attribute lookups for the proxy are also performed the same way. Is it an accidental omission?

No, this is not accidental. super() does nothing for attribute lookups. The reason is that attributes on an instance are not associated with a particular class, they're just there. Consider the following:

class A:
    def __init__(self):
        self.foo = 'foo set from A'

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__()
        self.bar = 'bar set from B'

class C(B):
    def method(self):
        self.baz = 'baz set from C'

class D(C):
    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__()
        self.foo = 'foo set from D'
        self.baz = 'baz set from D'

instance = D()
instance.method()
instance.bar = 'not set from a class at all'

Which class "owns" foo, bar, and baz?

If I wanted to view instance as an instance of C, should it have a baz attribute before method is called? How about afterwards?

If I view instance as an instance of A, what value should foo have? Should bar be invisible because was only added in B, or visible because it was set to a value outside the class?

All of these questions are nonsense in Python. There's no possible way to design a system with the semantics of Python that could give sensible answers to them. __init__ isn't even special in terms of adding attributes to instances of the class; it's just a perfectly ordinary method that happens to be called as part of the instance creation protocol. Any method (or indeed code from another class altogether, or not from any class at all) can create attributes on any instance it has a reference to.

In fact, all of the attributes of instance are stored in the same place:

>>> instance.__dict__
{'baz': 'baz set from C', 'foo': 'foo set from D', 'bar': 'not set from a class at all'}

There's no way to tell which of them were originally set by which class, or were last set by which class, or whatever measure of ownership you want. There's certainly no way to get at "the A.foo being shadowed by D.foo", as you would expect from C++; they're the same attribute, and any writes to to it by one class (or from elsewhere) will clobber a value left in it by the other class.

The consequence of this is that super() does not perform attribute lookups the same way it does method lookups; it can't, and neither can any code you write.


In fact, from running some experiments, neither super nor Sven's Delegate actually support direct attribute retrieval at all!

class A:
    def __init__(self):
        self.spoon = 1
        self.fork = 2

    def foo(self):
        print('A.foo')

class B(A):
    def foo(self):
        print('B.foo')

b = B()

d = Delegate(A, b)
s = super(B, b)

Then both work as expected for methods:

>>> d.foo()
A.foo
>>> s.foo()
A.foo

But:

>>> d.fork
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#43>", line 1, in <module>
    d.fork
  File "/tmp/foo.py", line 6, in __getattr__
    x = getattr(self._delegate_cls, name)
AttributeError: type object 'A' has no attribute 'fork'
>>> s.spoon
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#45>", line 1, in <module>
    s.spoon
AttributeError: 'super' object has no attribute 'spoon'

So they both only really work for calling some methods on, not for passing to arbitrary third party code to pretend to be an instance of the class you want to delegate to.

They don't behave the same way in the presence of multiple inheritance unfortunately. Given:

class Delegate:
    def __init__(self, cls, obj):
        self._delegate_cls = cls
        self._delegate_obj = obj
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        x = getattr(self._delegate_cls, name)
        if hasattr(x, "__get__"):
            return x.__get__(self._delegate_obj)
        return x


class A:
    def foo(self):
        print('A.foo')

class B:
    pass

class C(B, A):
    def foo(self):
        print('C.foo')

c = C()

d = Delegate(B, c)
s = super(C, c)

Then:

>>> d.foo()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#50>", line 1, in <module>
    d.foo()
  File "/tmp/foo.py", line 6, in __getattr__
    x = getattr(self._delegate_cls, name)
AttributeError: type object 'B' has no attribute 'foo'
>>> s.foo()
A.foo

Because Delegate ignores the full MRO of whatever class _delegate_obj is an instance of, only using the MRO of _delegate_cls. Whereas super does what you asked in the question, but the behaviour seems quite strange: it's not wrapping an instance of C to pretend it's an instance of B, because direct instances of B don't have foo defined.

Here's my attempt:

class MROSkipper:
    def __init__(self, cls, obj):
        self.__cls = cls
        self.__obj = obj

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        mro = self.__obj.__class__.__mro__
        i = mro.index(self.__cls)
        if i == 0:
            # It's at the front anyway, just behave as getattr
            return getattr(self.__obj, name)
        else:
            # Check __dict__ not getattr, otherwise we'd find methods
            # on classes we're trying to skip
            try:
                return self.__obj.__dict__[name]
            except KeyError:
                return getattr(super(mro[i - 1], self.__obj), name)

I rely on the __mro__ attribute of classes to properly figure out where to start from, then I just use super. You could walk the MRO chain from that point yourself checking class __dict__s for methods instead if the weirdness of going back one step to use super is too much.

I've made no attempt to handle unusual attributes; those implemented with descriptors (including properties), or those magic methods looked up behind the scenes by Python, which often start at the class rather than the instance directly. But this behaves as you asked moderately well (with the caveat expounded on ad nauseum in the first part of my post; looking up attributes this way will not give you any different results than looking them up directly in the instance).

share|improve this answer
    
super and Delegate don't handle instance attributes because it wouldn't make much sense to do so. They both do handle class attributes correctly, though. –  Sven Marnach Jan 16 '12 at 23:16
    
@SvenMarnach It does for the OP's stated purpose of bundling up an instance which implements methods starting further up in the MRO, to then pass to other code that has no knowledge it's getting a wrapper. Often, but not always, the other code will manipulate the object purely through methods, so you'd want to be able to retrieve attributes as well. –  Ben Jan 16 '12 at 23:24
    
Right, got the point. –  Sven Marnach Jan 16 '12 at 23:27
    
@Ben: thanks, this really helps me understand why super() doesn't work with attribute lookups. And I do understand the code you use for looking up methods in the original MRO; for my purposes, I do want the new MRO to be used for my purposes. –  max Jan 17 '12 at 1:16

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