Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a collection of users, each of which may be subscribed to one or more services. Each service has some meta data, including the number of credits the user has for that service.

How can I find all of the user objects who have less than 50 credits for some service if I have no way of knowing what the service objects keys will be?

Conceptually, it would be something like this, which doesn't work:

db.users.find({services.*.credits : {$lt : 50}})

The users collection:

   {
_id: 4f0ea25072139e4d2000001f,
services : {
    a : { credits : 100, score : 2000 },
    b : { credits : 200, score : 300 },
    c : { credits : 10, score : 1300 }
    }
},
{
_id: 4f0ea25072139e4d2000001f,
services : {
    f : { credits : 68, score : 14 },
    q : { credits : 1000, score : 102 },
    z : { credits : 59, score : 352 }
    }
}

Another example of what I want to do, in case it's not clear here, is explained here: http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Advanced+Queries#comment-346075854

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think it would be easier if you put that services object into an array, so you can use $elemMatch, like:

{
  services : [
    {key: "a" , credits : 100, score : 2000 },
    {key: "b", credits : 200, score : 300 },
    {key: "c", credits : 10, score : 1300 }
  ]
}

and

{
  _id: 4f0ea25072139e4d2000001f,
  services : [
    {key: "f", credits : 68, score : 14 },
    {key: "q", credits : 1000, score : 102 },
    {key: "z", credits : 59, score : 352 }
  ]
}

Then the query you would write would be like this:

db.coll.find({services: {$elemMatch : {credits: {$lt: 50}}}});

result:

{ "_id" : ObjectId("4f0f2be07561bf94ea47eec4"), "services" : [  {   "key" : "a", "credits" : 100, "score" : 2000 }, { "key" : "b", "credits" : 200, "score" : 300 },    {   "key" : "c",    "credits" : 10,     "score" : 1300 } ] }
share|improve this answer
    
I did end up changing our schema to just use an array. I could have used $elemMatch, but since I only needed to match on a single criteria, I was able to do: db.users.find({services.credits : {$lt:50}}) –  stuporglue Jan 13 '12 at 17:55
1  
-1 because this is not an answer to the question. Not everyone has the ability to change the schema of the data they are working with. This question remains unanswered. –  CommaToast Nov 17 '14 at 5:46
    
OK I answered it myself. Found a way to do it. Posted below. –  CommaToast Nov 17 '14 at 6:45

I don't know of a way to accomplish this using the schema you're using. It seems to me you're abusing objects as arrays. If services were an array (the plural hints that it should be), you could simply query

db.users.find({"services.credits" : { $lt : 50 }}); 

or use $elemMatch if you need to match multiple conditions on a single array element.

share|improve this answer
    
What I really wanted was associative arrays, which would prevent me from having two array elements for the same service id. Our users should never end up with {services:[{service:f,credits 50},{service:f,credits:60}]}. An associative array enforces this, and makes 90% of our lookups trivial. Using regular arrays forces me to search the array first before doing queries to see if I need to add to the services array or find an element and update it. –  stuporglue Jan 13 '12 at 18:08
    
Almost all consistency checking must be done in code. That is also true for associative arrays. MongoDB does not support constraints in embedded documents: waistcode.net/blog/unique-array-keys-in-mongodb, i.e. an object can't 'violate itself'. –  mnemosyn Jan 13 '12 at 18:16
    
This is not an answer to the question. @stuporglue's comment above explains a perfectly valid and great reason to have created his data model the way he did. It's the same reason our data model was done the way we did it. And I still need an answer to this question. People saying they don't know the answer, or accusing people of abusing things, etc., is just unproductive. –  CommaToast Nov 17 '14 at 5:57

This is an actual answer to your question.

How you can find all of the user objects who have less than 50 credits for some service if you have no way of knowing what the service objects keys will be is as follows.

Use a $where query:

db.users.find({
    $where: function () {
        for (var index in this.services)
            if (this.services[index].credits < 50)
                return this;
    }
});
share|improve this answer
1  
This is one of the least informed answers I have ever seen, setting aside that the question is almost 3y old. It is enormously arrogant to downvote two of the top answerers in the MongoDB tag and provide an answer that lacks elementary understanding of how databases work. Your 'query' lacks index support entirely. There's just no reason to use a data structure like this; if you can't even simulate an index, you're performing a collection scan every time and you could just as well load the entire collection in RAM and scan it there, which then is a trivial exercise in JavaScript. –  mnemosyn Nov 17 '14 at 8:40
    
He asked, "How can I find all of the user objects who have less than 50 credits for some service if I have no way of knowing what the service objects keys will be?" I answered his question. I didn't downvote the "answerers" just the answers, because they weren't answers. They were people saying, "You can't/shouldn't do that" when clearly you can, and it's a purely a matter of opinion as to whether you should. I disagree that "there's just no reason to use data structure like this" ... there are plenty of great reasons to do so. Just because you don't know them, isn't really my fault nor op's. –  CommaToast Nov 18 '14 at 4:07
    
I don't look at people's rep I just read the answer. I don't doubt that you know more about MongoDB than I do. But if it's not an answer to the question that was asked then I am obliged to downvote it; I'm not going to not do so simply because you have a high rep. Telling someone there is no way to do something, when in fact there is, is not cool. Telling people that their data structure is pointless just because you don't see the point of it, is not cool either. Maybe they have a great reason for using it which you simply don't understand. Maybe if you asked what the point is you might learn. –  CommaToast Nov 18 '14 at 4:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.