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I have a collection of users, each of which may be subscribed to one or more services. Each service has some meta data, including the number of credits the user has for that service.

How can I find all of the user objects who have less than 50 credits for some service if I have no way of knowing what the service objects keys will be?

Conceptually, it would be something like this, which doesn't work:

db.users.find({services.*.credits : {$lt : 50}})

The users collection:

   {
_id: 4f0ea25072139e4d2000001f,
services : {
    a : { credits : 100, score : 2000 },
    b : { credits : 200, score : 300 },
    c : { credits : 10, score : 1300 }
    }
},
{
_id: 4f0ea25072139e4d2000001f,
services : {
    f : { credits : 68, score : 14 },
    q : { credits : 1000, score : 102 },
    z : { credits : 59, score : 352 }
    }
}

Another example of what I want to do, in case it's not clear here, is explained here: http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Advanced+Queries#comment-346075854

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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think it would be easier if you put that services object into an array, so you can use $elemMatch, like:

{
  services : [
    {key: "a" , credits : 100, score : 2000 },
    {key: "b", credits : 200, score : 300 },
    {key: "c", credits : 10, score : 1300 }
  ]
}

and

{
  _id: 4f0ea25072139e4d2000001f,
  services : [
    {key: "f", credits : 68, score : 14 },
    {key: "q", credits : 1000, score : 102 },
    {key: "z", credits : 59, score : 352 }
  ]
}

Then the query you would write would be like this:

db.coll.find({services: {$elemMatch : {credits: {$lt: 50}}}});

result:

{ "_id" : ObjectId("4f0f2be07561bf94ea47eec4"), "services" : [  {   "key" : "a", "credits" : 100, "score" : 2000 }, { "key" : "b", "credits" : 200, "score" : 300 },    {   "key" : "c",    "credits" : 10,     "score" : 1300 } ] }
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I did end up changing our schema to just use an array. I could have used $elemMatch, but since I only needed to match on a single criteria, I was able to do: db.users.find({services.credits : {$lt:50}}) –  stuporglue Jan 13 '12 at 17:55
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I don't know of a way to accomplish this using the schema you're using. It seems to me you're abusing objects as arrays. If services were an array (the plural hints that it should be), you could simply query

db.users.find({"services.credits" : { $lt : 50 }}); 

or use $elemMatch if you need to match multiple conditions on a single array element.

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What I really wanted was associative arrays, which would prevent me from having two array elements for the same service id. Our users should never end up with {services:[{service:f,credits 50},{service:f,credits:60}]}. An associative array enforces this, and makes 90% of our lookups trivial. Using regular arrays forces me to search the array first before doing queries to see if I need to add to the services array or find an element and update it. –  stuporglue Jan 13 '12 at 18:08
    
Almost all consistency checking must be done in code. That is also true for associative arrays. MongoDB does not support constraints in embedded documents: waistcode.net/blog/unique-array-keys-in-mongodb, i.e. an object can't 'violate itself'. –  mnemosyn Jan 13 '12 at 18:16
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