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If I typedef some type within a struct (functor), is the scope of the typedef local to the struct?

Consider the following example where I have typdef'ed foo to be an int and a double in the two separate functors. Is this example correct?

template <typename T> 
struct firstfunctor 
{ 
  typedef int foo; 

  foo operator()(const foo& a, const foo& b) 
  { 
    return /*whatever*/
  } 
}; 

template <typename T> 
struct secondfunctor 
{ 
  typedef double foo; 

  foo operator()(const foo& a, const foo& b) 
  { 
    return /*whatever*/
  } 
}; 
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, typedefs are scoped, and you define the member types firstfunctor::foo and secondfunctor::foo, respectively.

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+1, although wouldn't it be a member type alias? –  Pubby Jan 12 '12 at 18:55
    
@Pubby: Maybe. Perhaps member type name is a good term... and also a reminder that you'll need to say typename firstfunctor<T>::foo a lot :-) –  Kerrek SB Jan 12 '12 at 18:56

Yes, the typedefs are scoped. You will have to specify the scope when using them.

This applies to objects, classes and libraries. Scope is usually limited to what is defined inside a set of { }.

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Yes.

This goes for functions and namespaces too.


The type would be firstfunctor<>::foo qualified. You can make it private, although C++11's auto allows you to get around this.

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Yes and you can use those typedefs for interesting meta-programming concepts whereby you are passed in a class to a template (or even a template in this case) and can use

typename X<T>::foo

to get your "dynamic" type.

where X is your templated template parameter.

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