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I'm trying to make a connection to an oracle database using the sample codes like this:

public static Connection getConnection() throws ClassNotFoundException {
    Class.forName("oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver");
    Properties env = new Properties();
    //env.put(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY, "com.ibm.websphere.naming.WsnInitialContextFactory");
    env.put(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY, "com.sun.jndi.ldap.LdapCtxFactory");
    env.put(Context.PROVIDER_URL, "ldap://192.168.1.1:389/o=myo,dc=mydc,dc=us");
    Connection connection = null;

    try {
        InitialContext context = new InitialContext(env);
        DataSource dataSource = (DataSource) context.lookup("jdbc/DataSource");
        connection = dataSource.getConnection();
    } catch (NamingException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (SQLException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    return connection;
}

But it always throw exception like this:

javax.naming.InvalidNameException: jdbc: [LDAP: error code 34 - invalid DN]; remaining name 'jdbc/DataSource'

Where and how should i specify that jdbc/DataSource?

I'm confused as I was given a working project using codes similar as above but nowhere tells what DataSource is. I'm wondering if jdbc/DataSource should be a DN in LDAP, but I find nothing seem relavent in my given ldap data. Sorry if that question is stupid or not make sense, i'm new to that all stuff.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
What is the environment you are running in? Is it a standalone console app? A web application? Are you running in some application server? –  Olaf Jan 12 '12 at 20:41
    
@Olaf, the working project is a servlet running on websphere in AIX. I'm testing that code in a console app in windows, using OpenLDAP & Oracle. The target is to make connection in servlet running in Websphere community edition in windows environment. –  John Jan 12 '12 at 20:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Having studied for weeks, finally make a solution out as below. Hope this may help others in case they are facing the same issue.

I was to switch a web application from WebSphere to Tomcat which the app get the connections from a directory in WebSphere. Tomcat has no that directory, but it can specify that in server.xml/context.xml/web.xml, but i was never able to make it works! So my solution is to use a file based directory:

public static Connection getConnection() throws ClassNotFoundException {
    Class.forName("oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver");
    Properties env = new Properties();

    env.put(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY, "com.sun.jndi.fscontext.RefFSContextFactory");
    env.put(Context.PROVIDER_URL, "file:/C://JNDI");

    Connection connection = null;

    try {
        InitialContext context = new InitialContext(env);
        DataSource dataSource = (DataSource) context.lookup("jdbc/DataSource");
        connection = dataSource.getConnection();
    } catch (NamingException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (SQLException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    return connection;
}

Just changed two lines in env.put and works fine. But there is some preparation work to create the file based directory and here is the program which create a file C:\JNDI.binding

public static void main(String args[]) throws SQLException, NamingException {

    Context ctx = null;
    try {
        Properties prop = new Properties();
        prop.setProperty(Context.INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY,
                "com.sun.jndi.fscontext.RefFSContextFactory");
        prop.setProperty(Context.PROVIDER_URL, "file:/C:/JNDI");
        ctx = new InitialContext(prop);

        OracleDataSource ds = new OracleDataSource();
        ds.setDriverType("thin");
        ds.setServerName("123.123.123.123");
        ds.setPortNumber(1521);
        ds.setDatabaseName("xe");
        ds.setUser("username");
        ds.setPassword("password");
        ctx.bind("jdbc/DataSource", ds);

    } catch (NamingException ne) {
        System.err.println(ne.getMessage());

        ne.printStackTrace();
    }

}

To make it works in my production websphere and testing tomcat, i just use different INITIAL_CONTEXT_FACTORY settings depends on properties file,

Thanks Olaf for the great help!

share|improve this answer

Got this from http://kb2.adobe.com/cps/195/tn_19576.html:

Error: Error in bind from LDAP source: [LDAP: error code 34 - invalid DN] javax.naming.InvalidNameException

Cause: This is caused by a bad prefix specified in the Settings tab, on most LDAP/AD systems. This could mean you did not specify a prefix at all, which means the LDAP/AD server did not receive a full DN from CPS or that you did not specify a correct prefix, such as CN instead of UID, which results in the LDAP/AD server not receiving a correct DN from CPS. Can also be caused by a missing comma at the beginning of the suffix or an extra comma at the end of the suffix. This error could also mean the authentication type is incorrect.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm thinking there should be some "thing" in LADP with DN "jdbc/DataSource", but what that thing should look like? –  John Jan 13 '12 at 9:17
    
Where did you specify your jdbc/DataSource resource in your OpenLDAP directory? –  Olaf Jan 13 '12 at 18:16
    
@Olaf, it turns out that information is websphere inside of LDAP, but i would like to store in LDAP which i have no idea how... –  John Jan 18 '12 at 10:06

If your code used to work in WebSphere, I'm guessing that the jdbc context might be inside the jee:jndi-lookup context. Can you try to look up "jee:jndi-lookup/jdbc/DataSource" or "java:comp/env/jdbc/DataSource"?

You should try a GUI directory browser to browse your OpenLDAP directory to find out in what context is your DataSource defined.

share|improve this answer
    
I added a WebSphere tag to your question to expose it to the WebSphere experts. Maybe they'd know WebSphere JNDI/LDAP integration. I'm more of the Tomcat guy. –  Olaf Jan 14 '12 at 17:27
    
thanks for your help. I just found out that the jdbc/DataSource is defined INSIDE websphere which can be accessed through the context "com.ibm.websphere.naming.WsnInitialContextFactory". I'm still testing how to move that jdbc/DataSource to LDAP instead of using product specific stuff. –  John Jan 18 '12 at 10:02
    
@John: If you are going to access your JDBC source from a web application, I believe the better approach would be to rely on the standard web server means of configuring JDBC sources. You should define it as a resource in the context of your web application. If you really, really want to define it in the way accessible by the same name for outside applications, you indeed can store it in LDAP and just point your web application resource to use LDAP via JNDI, but I believe you should really have good reasons to do that. –  Olaf Jan 18 '12 at 16:42
    
I'm not sure what is the best practise to store the JDBC sources. But I believe storing in WebSphere is not ideal as for portability. Now i would like to port to Tomcat and even WebSphereCE, but fail... –  John Jan 20 '12 at 11:54
    
@John: You will have to encapsulate differences between environments somehow. I believe it is beneficial to be able to run the same binary application in either Tomcat or WebSphere. In that case you can push all differences, ideally, into the server configuration files. Here's an article on migrating apps from Tomcat to WebSphere: ibm.com/developerworks/websphere/library/techarticles/0511_li1/… . I understand that you are interested in moving in the opposite direction, but this article should provide you enough info on differences and commonalities of two environments. –  Olaf Jan 25 '12 at 18:21

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