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I know it has been asked many times... but I can't seem to figure out how to accomplish this simple task. Datas are not sorted.

Sample data :

file_1

E-J1-N4  
D-J5-N7  
F-J1-N5  
E-J5-N8  

file_2

E-J5-N8  
F-J5-N2  
E-J1-N4  
D-J5-N7    
F-J1-N5  
F-J5-N1  
F-J5-N12  
F-J5-N3 

(I edited the datas to better reflect my actual dataset, what seem to be causing problems are the Nxx, N12 here. As they are right know, datas are not easily sortable, I know I could format all my numbers to be N01 N02 ect... But if I could avoid that, it would be nice.)

So I simply need to print $names in file_2 that are not in file_1

grep -vf file_1 file_2  

does not work.

for name in `file_1`; do grep -v $name file_2; done  

gives me a ton of output... (64 #names with duplicates). The loop without the -v flag does not work neither, it adds datas. (wc -l doesn't match)

So, why grep -vf not working ? Could it be a sorting problem ? Why the loop is not working and if it would, how could I reverse the grep in the for loop ?

As always, thanx a lot for looking ! I'm open to other solutions as well (awk, python).

share|improve this question
3  
grep -vf file_1 file_2 works fine for me for your input files. – anubhava Jan 12 '12 at 20:19
    
Yes, your grep works for me on my Mac OS X (which is BSD). – Hai Vu Jan 13 '12 at 5:18
    
Thank you for your replies. Yes, command works if there is no Nxx in dataset, but with edited datas, I get an extra $name : F-J1-N5 in file_1 and in output of grep -vf ! Why ??? – Chargaff Jan 13 '12 at 16:35
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This would work:

comm -1 -3 <(sort file_1) <(sort file_2)

Test:

[jaypal:~/Temp] comm -1 -3 <(sort file_1) <(sort file_2)
F-J5-N2
F-J5-N3
F-J6-N1
F-J6-N2
F-J6-N3
F-J6-N4
F-J6-N5
F-J6-N6
F-J6-N7
F-J6-N8
F-J8-N1
F-J9-N1
F-J9-N2

Update:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat ff1
E-J1-N4
D-J5-N7
F-J1-N5
E-J5-N8

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat ff2
E-J5-N8
F-J5-N2
E-J1-N4
D-J5-N7
F-J1-N5
F-J5-N1
F-J5-N12
F-J5-N3

[jaypal:~/Temp] comm -1 -3 <(sort ff1) <(sort ff2)
F-J5-N1
F-J5-N12
F-J5-N2
F-J5-N3
share|improve this answer
    
As they are, datas are not easily naturally sortable, from my point of view anyway... F-J9-Nxx vs F-J9-Nx is the cause. – Chargaff Jan 13 '12 at 16:37
    
So you want the output data to be sorted as well? With your new data set, I get the 4 records that are not present in File_1. Updated answer added to original post – jaypal singh Jan 13 '12 at 16:45
    
interesting... I get 5 records from your comm command : comm -1 -3 <(sort 1) <(sort 2) : F-J1-N5, F-J5-N1, F-J5-N12, F-J5-N2, F-J5-N3. Why would your command gives right output ? – Chargaff Jan 13 '12 at 17:03
    
Looks like your files have special characters. Do cat -vet and see if there is any space, tab, carriage-return which could be throwing it off. Especially look at the line with F-J1-N5 line – jaypal singh Jan 13 '12 at 17:05
    
wow... you are so right ! I had spaces in both files, now your command works. I'll check for special character in my dataset and test your command. Thanx ! – Chargaff Jan 13 '12 at 17:14

One way using awk:

awk 'NR==FNR { a[$0]; next } !($0 in a)' file_1 file_2

Result:

F-J5-N2
F-J5-N3
F-J6-N1
F-J6-N2
F-J6-N3
F-J6-N4
F-J6-N5
F-J6-N6
F-J6-N7
F-J6-N8
F-J8-N1
F-J9-N1
F-J9-N2
share|improve this answer
    
Same here, with edited datas, I get an extra $name.awk 'NR==FNR { a[$0]; next } !($0 in a)' 1 2 F-J5-N2 F-J1-N5 F-J5-N1 F-J5-N12 F-J5-N3 – Chargaff Jan 13 '12 at 16:39
    
Your solution work as well, once I have removed spaces from my dataset... Thank you ! – Chargaff Jan 13 '12 at 17:19
    
@Birei We can do awk 'NR==FNR { a[$0]; next } !($0 in a)' file_{1,2} … Less typing. :) – jaypal singh Jan 14 '12 at 22:06

This solution only works if there is not duplicate lines within file_2 and file_1 is a subset of file_2:

sort file_[12] | uniq -u

Explain: the sort command combines the two files, then sort them. The uniq command then only picked out those lines that are not duplicated, which means the ones in file_2, but not in file_1.

Note that if you replace the -u flag with -d then the output will consist of those lines that are duplicated, meaning appears in both files.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, thank you for your explanation. But again, my dataset is not easily sortable. If I can't get any script to work without sorting datas, I'll have to write a script to modify my datas so they'll be sortable.... – Chargaff Jan 13 '12 at 16:44
awk 'FNR==NR{a[$0];next}!($0 in a)' file_1 file_2
share|improve this answer
    
same as above.... – Chargaff Jan 13 '12 at 16:39
    
Good solution as well, thank you guy's, you are an invaluable resource ! – Chargaff Jan 13 '12 at 17:21

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