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I'm trying to plot a surface in python. I have a table of N by N values. I have created two vectors X and Y each of N elements. When I try to plot this, I get an error:

ValueError: total size of new array must be unchanged

I have checked the examples and I see there that for N elements of Z there are N elements for X and Y.

This doesn't make any sense for me. How come I need N elements and not N by N?

Here is a sample code:

import random import math

from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

bignum = 100

mat = []
X = []
Y = []

for x in range(0,bignum):
    mat.append([])
    X.append(x);
    for y in range (0,bignum):
        mat[x].append(random.random())
        Y.append(y)

fig = plt.figure(figsize=plt.figaspect(2.))
ax = fig.add_subplot(1,1,1, projection='3d')
surf = ax.plot_surface(X,Y,mat)
share|improve this question
    
Can you post the lines of code that throw the error? –  NoBugs Jan 12 '12 at 20:31

1 Answer 1

First off, don't ever do things like this:

mat = []
X = []
Y = []

for x in range(0,bignum):
    mat.append([])
    X.append(x);
    for y in range (0,bignum):
        mat[x].append(random.random())
        Y.append(y)

That's equivalent to:

mat = np.random.random((bignum, bignum))
X, Y = np.mgrid[:bignum, :bignum]

...but it's orders of magnitude faster and uses a fraction of the memory that using lists and then converting to arrays would.

However, your example works perfectly.

from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

bignum = 100
mat = np.random.random((bignum, bignum))
X, Y = np.mgrid[:bignum, :bignum]

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(1,1,1, projection='3d')
surf = ax.plot_surface(X,Y,mat)
plt.show()

enter image description here

If you read the documentation for plot_surface, it clearly says that X, Y, and Z are expected to be 2D arrays.

This is so that you can plot more complex surfaces (e.g. spheres) by inherently defining the connectivity between points. (E.g. see this example from the matplotlib gallery: http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/examples/mplot3d/surface3d_demo2.html )

If you have 1D X and Y arrays, and want a simple surface from a 2D grid, then use numpy.meshgrid or numpy.mgrid to generate the appropriate X and Y 2D arrays.

Edit: Just to explain what mgrid and meshgrid do, let's take a look at their output:

print np.mgrid[:5, :5]

yields:

array([[[0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
        [1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
        [2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
        [3, 3, 3, 3, 3],
        [4, 4, 4, 4, 4]],

       [[0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
        [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]]])

So, it returns a single, 3D array with a shape of 2x5x5, but its easier to think of this as a two 2D arrays. One represents the i coordinates for any point on a 5x5 grid, while the other represents the j coordinates.

Because of the way python's unpacking works, we can just write:

xx, yy = np.mgrid[:5, :5]

Python doesn't care exactly what mgrid returns, it will just try to unpack it to two items. Because numpy arrays iterate over slices of their first axis, we'll get 2, 5x5 arrays if we unpack an array with a shape of (2x5x5). Similarly, we can do things like:

xx, yy, zz = np.mgrid[:5, :5, :5]

...and get 3, 3D 5x5x5 arrays of indicies. Also, if we slice with a different range (e.g. xx, yy = np.mgrid[10:15, 3:8] it would tile indicies from 10 to 14 (inclusive) and 3 to 7 (inclusive).

There's a bit more that mgrid does (it can take complex step arguments to mimic linspace, e.g. xx, yy = np.mgrid[0:1:10j, 0:5:5j] will return 2 10x5 arrays with increasing numbers between 0-1 and 0-5, respectively), but let's skip on to meshgrid for a second.

meshgrid takes two arrays and tiles them in a similar way to mgrid. As an example:

x = np.arange(5)
y = np.arange(5)
xx, yy = np.meshgrid(x, y)
print xx, yy

yields:

(array([[0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
       [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
       [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
       [0, 1, 2, 3, 4],
       [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]]), 

array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
       [2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [3, 3, 3, 3, 3],
       [4, 4, 4, 4, 4]]))

meshgrid actually happens to return a tuple of 2, 5x5 2D arrays, but that distinction doesn't matter. The key difference is that the indicies don't have to increase in a particular direction. It just tiles the arrays that it's given. As an example:

x = [0.1, 2.4, -5, 19]
y = [-4.3, 2, -1, 18.4]
xx, yy = np.meshgrid(x, y)

yields:

(array([[  0.1,   2.4,  -5. ,  19. ],
       [  0.1,   2.4,  -5. ,  19. ],
       [  0.1,   2.4,  -5. ,  19. ],
       [  0.1,   2.4,  -5. ,  19. ]]),
 array([[ -4.3,  -4.3,  -4.3,  -4.3],
       [  2. ,   2. ,   2. ,   2. ],
       [ -1. ,  -1. ,  -1. ,  -1. ],
       [ 18.4,  18.4,  18.4,  18.4]]))

As you'll notice, it just tiled the values that we gave it.

Basically, you use these when you need to work with indicies in the same shape as your input grid. It's mostly useful when you want to evaluate a function on a grid values.

E.g.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x, y = np.mgrid[-10:10, -10:10]
dist = np.hypot(x, y) # Linear distance from point 0, 0
z = np.cos(2 * dist / np.pi)

plt.title(r'$\cos(\frac{2*\sqrt{x^2 + y^2}}{\pi})$', size=20)
plt.imshow(z, origin='lower', interpolation='bicubic',
          extent=(x.min(), x.max(), y.min(), y.max()))
plt.colorbar()
plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
2  
Joe you're exactly right, but it would work in the example if X.append(x) was moved inside the second loop. plot_surface still works if you have a 1D array that is NxN long. The error is saying that matplotlib can't reshape the 1D array so that it is a N by N 2D array. Also you're too fast. –  Yann Jan 12 '12 at 20:47
    
Thanks. This is just a test to see I understand the surface plot. I, actually, plan to do something similar to Fourier's transform and I don't know how to do complex operation or conditional operation in single line in python. I'll post a new question for this. –  Yotam Jan 12 '12 at 20:50
    
@Yann - Ah, right! I didn't actually run his code as it was posted... Guess I should have! It seems like you actually answered his question, then. ...And for whatever it's worth, you beat me to the punch even more often. :) –  Joe Kington Jan 12 '12 at 20:52
    
@JoeKington: I'm even more confused now. I don't really understand what mgrid generates. The example in python documentation give two arrays of N by N (two 2s arrays and not one). Random documentation on the other hand, doesn't give an option to put range in it. –  Yotam Jan 12 '12 at 21:17
    
@Yotam - mgrid is an object that you can index to generate ND arrays. meshgrid might be a bit easier to understand at first. xx, yy = np.mgrid[:10, :10] is the same as x, y = np.arange(10), np.arange(10); xx, yy = np.meshgrid(x, y) –  Joe Kington Jan 12 '12 at 21:21

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