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How do I check if a table has contents? Honestly I still don't have any initial codes for it. Do I code it in VB or just use a query?

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4 Answers 4

you definitely need to ask SQL server, so why not just querying 'SELECT COUNT(*) FROM TABLE" ? which you can put it in a stored procedure.

even you can parametrise the procedure with table name and run exec sql command.

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I would not use SELECT COUNT(*) unless you actually care about the actual count - this can be an expensive operation on large tables. If all you care about is whether there are rows or not, much better to use:

IF EXISTS (SELECT TOP (1) NULL FROM dbo.MyTable)
BEGIN
    PRINT 'There are rows.';
END
ELSE
BEGIN
    PRINT 'There are no rows.';
END

If you don't need to be up-to-the-second, you can use the DMVs for this kind of check. Specifically:

SELECT SUM(row_count)
    FROM sys.dm_db_partition_stats 
    WHERE [object_id] = OBJECT_ID('dbo.MyTable');

The DMV is not always precise due to in-flight transactions and deferred updates, but is generally reliable for ballpark estimates.

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hi .. thank you so much .. this is not the actual code that i needed but this gave me an idea ... thanks .. –  Mark Jan 12 '12 at 23:47

Install Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio. You can then view the contents and structure of your tables, easily, through the GUI.

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Dim con = New SqlConnection("Data Source=servername;Initial Catalog=myDb;Integrated Security=True")
Dim cmd = New SqlCommand("SELECT Count(*) FROM myTable", con)
con.Open()
Dim count As Integer = CInt(cmd.ExecuteScalar())
con.Close()
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this game an idea too ... thanks for the help ... –  Mark Jan 12 '12 at 23:47

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