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This should be something encountered by programmers often, but I never tried to get things this way.

That is, I'll explain. Say, I need to fetch values from table Zoo like this:

 @"SELECT z.predator, z.prey FROM Zoo AS z WHERE z.preyType=@carnivore"

Now I can get all the values to a List. I need to display the details of that querying in a grid. Now having got z.predator and z.prey values (which are for time sake integers, ie, their respective ids), I need to populate its meaningful values for displaying it to end user (I can't just display their ids). So now I might do something like this:

 foreach (Zoo z in lstZoo)
 {
       Animal predator = GetFromAnimalTable(z.Predator)
       Animal prey = GetFromAnimalTable(z.Prey)
 }

This can make the program slower. Can I query all the details in one go? Something like this:

   SELECT (SELECT * FROM ANIMAL WHERE id=z.predator), 
          (SELECT * FROM ANIMAL WHERE id=z.prey) 
   FROM Zoo AS z WHERE z.preyType=@carnivore

Provided I can read the values to a new bigger object? Or is this considered a bad practice?

UPDATE: Is it a standard practice to do this? Or is it recommended to individually populate as I stated first?

UPDATE 2: I seem to have made a terrible mistake of not posting the query exactly as I needed. I thought I could tweak the answers from here to meet my requirement, alas no with the parenthesis construction of Access queries.

Here is how my actual query would be:

SELECT z.predator, p.lifeSpan, z.prey 
FROM Zoo AS z 
INNER JOIN Plants AS p ON p.parent_id=z.id 
WHERE z.preyType=@carnivore

Actually I had an INNER JOIN query already with another table. Now I need to get (SELECT) values of z.predator (and its corresponding values from Animals table), p.lifeSpan, z.prey (and its corresponding values from Animal table) meeting the INNER JOIN and WHERE condition.

A pseudo code would look like this:

SELECT (SELECT * FROM ANIMAL WHERE id=z.predator), p.lifeSpan, (SELECT * FROM ANIMAL WHERE id=z.prey) 
FROM Zoo AS z INNER JOIN Plants AS p ON p.parent_id=z.id 
WHERE z.preyType=@carnivore

It should be pretty easy to extend my requirement from the answers here, but no success till now. I tried:

SELECT a1.*, p.lifeSpan, a2.* 
FROM Zoo AS z 
INNER JOIN Plants AS p ON p.parent_id=z.id 
INNER JOIN Animal AS a1 ON (a1.id=z.predator)
INNER JOIN Animal AS a2 ON (a2.id=z.prey)
WHERE z.preyType=@carnivore

And many variants of this with and without brackets. How can the above query be properly structured?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems this your latest query attempt:

SELECT a1.*, p.lifeSpan, a2.* 
FROM Zoo AS z 
INNER JOIN Plants AS p ON p.parent_id=z.id 
INNER JOIN Animal AS a1 ON (a1.id=z.predator)
INNER JOIN Animal AS a2 ON (a2.id=z.prey)";
WHERE z.preyType=@carnivore

Discard the semicolon from inside the statement. Also discard the double quote.

Just to simplify the SQL, exclude the WHERE clause for now.

Then you should be in a better position to address the issue of parentheses which Access' db engine requires for multiple joins.

SELECT a1.*, p.lifeSpan, a2.* 
FROM
    ((Zoo AS z 
    INNER JOIN Plants AS p ON p.parent_id=z.id) 
    INNER JOIN Animal AS a1 ON a1.id=z.predator)
    INNER JOIN Animal AS a2 ON a2.id=z.prey

Notice I discarded those parentheses which enclosed the ON expressions. Simple ON expressions don't require them. If you had a compound expression for ON, then you would need parentheses like this:

ON (p.parent_id=z.id AND p.foo = z.bar)

The sample query I suggested looks correct to me. (If it works for you, add your WHERE clause back again.) However, I don't pay close attention to parentheses placement because I use Access' query designer to set up joins ... and it adds the parentheses the db engine requires.

I urge you to do the same. If you're using an Access db from Dot.Net without having a copy of Access installed, you really should get a copy. Trying to use a database without that database's native development tools is an unreasonable challenge ... somewhat like trying to type while wearing mittens.

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to be honest, I asked you to help me after seeing your profile. You seem to be an access specialist :D –  nawfal Jan 13 '12 at 19:08
    
The double quote and semicolon thing, its a typo obviously.. Yeah I would use the query designer. Is it that query wizard you are talking about? I have used wizards before, not sure if that is what you mean by this.. –  nawfal Jan 13 '12 at 19:09
    
omG it just worked :D One question, is it a standard practice to query multiple objects like this with one query? –  nawfal Jan 13 '12 at 19:20
    
Yes, queries which join multiple data sources are common. In a normalized database, your data will be spread among multiple tables. Then join the tables in queries to view related data. If this is new to you, see if this page helps: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Database_normalization –  HansUp Jan 13 '12 at 19:43
    
Mm, I usually write different queries to populate each object (ie of objects of each table) –  nawfal Jan 13 '12 at 20:04
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SELECT pred.col1 AS PredCol1, ..., pred.colx AS PredColx, 
       prey.col1 AS PreyCol1, ..., prey.colx AS PreyColx
    FROM Zoo z
        INNER JOIN Animal pred
            ON z.predator = pred.id
        INNER JOIN Animal prey
            ON z.prey = prey.id
    WHERE z.preyType = @carnivore

Alternatively, you might want something like this instead.

SELECT 'Predator' AS AnimalType, pred.*
    FROM Zoo z
        INNER JOIN Animal pred
            ON z.predator = pred.id
    WHERE z.preyType = @carnivore
UNION ALL
SELECT 'Prey' AS AnimalType, prey.*
    FROM Zoo z
        INNER JOIN Animal prey
            ON z.prey = prey.id
    WHERE z.preyType = @carnivore
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Just change the SELECT to pred.PredatorName, prey.PrayName –  PedroC88 Jan 12 '12 at 21:45
    
Thanks Joe, let me assimilate this.. –  nawfal Jan 12 '12 at 21:45
    
@PedroC88 , no he is right here.. –  nawfal Jan 12 '12 at 21:47
    
His answer changed after I posted the comment but anyways, if you only need to display the name of the animals u don't need to SELECT *, just take the fields u need, it might ease a bit the network transfer. –  PedroC88 Jan 12 '12 at 21:59
1  
@PedroC88: As always, I reserve the right to fix my own boneheaded omissions and errors at any time. :-) –  Joe Stefanelli Jan 12 '12 at 22:02
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Try with Joining the tables

SELECT aPrey.Name as PreyName, aPredatior.Name as PredatorName 
FROM Zoo AS z 
LEFT JOIN Animal AS aPrey On aPrey.id= z.prey
LEFT JOIN Animal AS aPredatior On aPredatior.id= z.predator
WHERE z.preyType=@carnivore
share|improve this answer
    
thanks.. gimme some time.. –  nawfal Jan 12 '12 at 21:49
    
Also take into account that in this query you might need to account for DBNULL as aPrey.Name and aPredator.Name, unless you have properly created the Foreign Keys to the Animal table. –  PedroC88 Jan 12 '12 at 22:01
    
@PedroC88 yes I would.. –  nawfal Jan 12 '12 at 22:09
    
That query has 2 joins. Access' db engine will reject it because it demands parentheses with more than 1 join. –  HansUp Jan 12 '12 at 23:48
    
@HansUp how would the parentheses be placed in the above code? I have trouble getting that code working. –  nawfal Jan 13 '12 at 6:37
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