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If I come across old code that does if (!this) return; in an app, how severe a risk is this? Is it a dangerous ticking time bomb that requires an immediate app-wide search and destroy effort, or is it more like a code smell that can be quietly left in place?

I am not planning on writing code that does this, of course. Rather, I've recently discovered something in an old core library used by many pieces of our app.

Imagine a CLookupThingy class has a non-virtual CThingy *CLookupThingy::Lookup( name ) member function. Apparently one of the programmers back in those cowboy days encountered many crashes where NULL CLookupThingy *s were being passed from functions, and rather than fixing hundreds of call sites, he quietly fixed up Lookup():

CThingy *CLookupThingy::Lookup( name ) 
{
   if (!this)
   {
      return NULL;
   }
   // else do the lookup code...
}

// now the above can be used like
CLookupThingy *GetLookup() 
{
  if (notReady()) return NULL;
  // else etc...
}

CThingy *pFoo = GetLookup()->Lookup( "foo" ); // will set pFoo to NULL without crashing

I discovered this gem earlier this week, but now am conflicted as to whether I ought to fix it. This is in a core library used by all of our apps. Several of those apps have already been shipped to millions of customers, and it seems to be working fine; there are no crashes or other bugs from that code. Removing the if !this in the lookup function will mean fixing thousands of call sites that potentially pass NULL; inevitably some will be missed, introducing new bugs that will pop up randomly over the next year of development.

So I'm inclined to leave it alone, unless absolutely necessary.

Given that it is technically undefined behavior, how dangerous is if (!this) in practice? Is it worth man-weeks of labor to fix, or can MSVC and GCC be counted on to safely return?

Our app compiles on MSVC and GCC, and runs on Windows, Ubuntu, and MacOS. Portability to other platforms is irrelevant. The function in question is guaranteed to never be virtual.

Edit: The kind of objective answer I am looking for is something like

  • "Current versions of MSVC and GCC use an ABI where nonvirtual members are really statics with an implicit 'this' parameter; therefore they will safely branch into the function even if 'this' is NULL" or
  • "a forthcoming version of GCC will change the ABI so that even nonvirtual functions require loading a branch target from the class pointer" or
  • "the current GCC 4.5 has an inconsistent ABI where sometimes it compiles nonvirtual members as direct branches with an implicit parameter, and sometimes as class-offset function pointers."

The former means the code is stinky but unlikely to break; the second is something to test after a compiler upgrade; the latter requires immediate action even at high cost.

Clearly this is a latent bug waiting to happen, but right now I'm only concerned with mitigating risk on our specific compilers.

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2  
That's pretty terrible, but in your situation, I'm afraid there is not a lot you can do about it, given the huge deployment base. –  Alex B Jan 12 '12 at 21:55
18  
I think it belongs on the DailyWTF. –  DOK Jan 12 '12 at 21:57
7  
A call to NULL is undefined behavior in C++, so probably not a good idea to keep around. –  Joachim Isaksson Jan 12 '12 at 21:57
7  
This question may come across as subjective and not constructive - IT IS NOT! It does have a very objective and definit answer - "Remove, it's a ticking timebomb". It also has multiple subjective answers, depending on the users experience with old legacy codebases... –  Xeo Jan 12 '12 at 22:22
4  
It's not uncommon in very low-level class implementations. Think string class. A result of rigorous failure analysis, where do you like the exception to be raised? Do you like to take the blame in a class you've tested thoroughly and answer the phone when it bombs? Or do you delegate the crash to a class that's closer to the user's code, making it obvious he fecked up an argument? That's of course putting a positive spin on the practice, having it generate no exception at all is evil feck-you code. –  Hans Passant Jan 12 '12 at 22:31
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11 Answers

up vote 37 down vote accepted
+50

I would leave it alone. This might have been a deliberate choice as an old-fashioned version of the SafeNavigationOperator. As you say, in new code, I wouldn't recommend it, but for existing code, I'd leave it alone. If you do end up modifying it, I'd make sure that all calls to it are well-covered by tests.

Edit to add: you could choose to remove it only in debug versions of your code via:

CThingy *CLookupThingy::Lookup( name ) 
{
#if !defined(DEBUG)
   if (!this)
   {
      return NULL;
   }
#endif
   // else do the lookup code...
}

Thus, it wouldn't break anything on production code, while giving you a chance to test it in debug mode.

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13  
I've just added an assert that immediately trips in debug mode, so at least we can incrementally catch and fix all the cases as they come up in internal testing. –  Crashworks Jan 12 '12 at 22:48
2  
@Crashworks: Just make sure you're defining NDEBUG in your release mode. That's not always a given: stackoverflow.com/questions/5354314/… –  Ben Hocking Jan 15 '12 at 13:39
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Like all undefined behavior

if (!this)
{
   return NULL;
}

this is a bomb waiting to go off. If it works with your current compilers, you are kind-of lucky, kind-of unlucky!

The next release of the same compilers might be more aggressive and see this as dead code. As this can never be null, the code can "safely" be removed.

I think it is better if you removed it!

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Is it undefined behavior? I've encountered my fair share of NULL this pointers across many platforms -- is that just the typical way of implementing this (as an implicit parameter which might be NULL)? –  Doug T. Jan 13 '12 at 0:43
7  
@Doug : Dereferencing a null pointer in any fashion is UB, and in order for this to be null one would have to call a member function on a null CLookupThingy*. I.e., if (!this) will only evaluate to true if you're already in UB-land. –  ildjarn Jan 13 '12 at 2:33
4  
I.e. the test itself isn't UB, but it doesn't do anything in the absence of UB. What it does in the presence of UB is of course Undefined. –  MSalters Jan 13 '12 at 8:23
1  
@ildjarn: I was under the impression that calling a member function via an instance pointer does not immediately dereference that pointer. My mental model is that the pointer will simply be passed as the first "hidden" argument to a "plain" function. Am I wrong? –  Ben Jan 14 '12 at 0:49
2  
@Ben - To call a member function you need an object that the function is a member of. If the pointer is null, there is no object. That the x86 might not always detect this is just one reason for making it undefined. If all systems always crashed (or not), the behavior would be defined! –  Bo Persson Jan 17 '12 at 19:00
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If you have many GetLookup functions return NULL, then you're better off fixing code that calls methods using a NULL pointer. First, replace

if (!this) return NULL;

with

if (!this) {
  // TODO(Crashworks): Replace this case with an assertion on July, 2012, once all callers are fixed.
  printf("Please mail the following stack trace to myemailaddress. Thanks!");
  print_stacktrace();
  return NULL;
}

Now, carry on with your other work, but fix these as they roll in. Replace:

GetLookup(x)->Lookup(y)...

with

convert_to_proxy(GetLookup(x))->Lookup(y)...

Where conver_to_proxy does returns the pointer unchanged, unless it's NULL, in which case it returns a FailedLookupObject as in my other answer.

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5  
And what about the poor smuck who gets this error message when he is trying to do something useful like process an important order or sell his stocks before the price goes down! Message to comp sci graduates -- programs are written to be used not to be admired. –  James Anderson Jan 13 '12 at 6:38
1  
@JamesAnderson: The program works as before. Ideally, someone would fix all of the calls right now. If that can't happen, then the next best thing is to fix the problems as you find them. This has nothing to do with program vanity. –  Neil G Jan 13 '12 at 7:01
2  
What is some poor end user supposed to do when confronted with this message! He will probably conclude the program doesn't work and revert to some manual procedure until some replacement software from another vendor is found. You are introducing real bugs in order to trap imaginary bugs! –  James Anderson Jan 13 '12 at 7:56
    
Replace it with some function that automatically sends the stacktrace somewhere. Don't throw it into the users face. –  CodingBarfield Jan 13 '12 at 13:24
1  
@Crashworks then setup the client/server so that it only uploads the backlog of errors once in a while if the server isn't busy and only in this situation. You could even roll this out to a percentage of key users so the amount uploaded is smaller and you can use the same group for beta testing etc. –  CodingBarfield Jan 17 '12 at 7:22
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It may not crash in most compilers since non-virtual functions are typically either inlined or translated into non-member functions taking "this" as a parameter. However, the standard specifically says that calling a non-static member function outside the lifetime of the object is undefined, and the lifetime of an object is defined as beginning when memory for the object has been allocated and the constructor has completed, if it has non-trivial initialization.

The standard only makes an exception to this rule for calls made by the object itself during construction or destruction, but even then one must be careful because the behavior of virtual calls can differ from the behavior during the object's lifetime.

TL:DR: I'd kill it with fire, even if it will take a long time to clean up all the call sites.

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Future versions of the compiler are likely to more aggressively optimize in cases of formally undefined behavior. I wouldn't worry about existing deployments (where you know the behavior the compiler actually implemented), but it should be fixed in the source code in case you ever use a different compiler or different version.

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3  
How about evaluating the new compiler's behavior first, and then making a decision based on the results? –  Robert Harvey Jan 12 '12 at 22:03
1  
@Robert: How do you propose to do that, considering when it does break, it's likely to do so under very specific circumstances (probably inlined member functions when optimizations are turned up). –  Ben Voigt Jan 12 '12 at 22:06
1  
By running it against the preexisting suite of unit tests, of course, using the desired optimizations. Or, by smoke-testing it in the field. –  Robert Harvey Jan 12 '12 at 22:07
4  
@RobertHarvey: If there was a good existing set of tests, these sorts of bugs wouldn't have slipped in. –  Ben Voigt Jan 12 '12 at 22:08
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this is something that's called 'a smart and ugly hack'. note: smart != wise.

finding all the call sites without any refactoring tools should be easy enough; break GetLookup() somehow so it doesn't compile (e.g. change signature) so you can identify misusage statically. then add a function called DoLookup() which does what all this hacks are doing right now.

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In this case I'd suggest removing the NULL check from the member function and create a non-member function

CThingy* SafeLookup(CLookupThing *lookupThing) {
  if (lookupThing == NULL) {
    return NULL;
  } else {
    return lookupThing->Lookup();
  }
}

Then it should be easy enough to find every call to the Lookup member function and replace it with the safe non-member function.

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If it's something that's bothering you today, it'll bother you a year from now. As you pointed out, changing it will almost certainly introduce some bugs -- but you can begin by retaining the return NULL functionality, add a bit of logging, let it run in the wild for a few weeks, and find how many times it even gets hit?

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7  
"changing it will almost certainly introduce some bugs" No, the bugs are there either way -- changing it will only make the bugs observable instead of sweeping them under the rug and pretending they don't exist. –  ildjarn Jan 12 '12 at 22:12
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You can safely fix this today by returning a failed lookup object.

class CLookupThingy: public Interface {
  // ...
}

class CFailedLookupThingy: public Interface {
 public:
  CThingy* Lookup(string const& name) {
    return NULL;
  }
  operator bool() const { return false; }  // So that GetLookup() can be tested in a condition.
} failed_lookup;

Interface *GetLookup() {
  if (notReady())
    return &failed_lookup;
  // else etc...
}

This code still works:

CThingy *pFoo = GetLookup()->Lookup( "foo" ); // will set pFoo to NULL without crashing
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1  
The problem is that there isn't just one GetLookup() function that returns the CLookupThingys. They come from (literally) a thousand different sources, including functions on the far side of a DLL boundary. I would have to fix all such places to return the failed_lookup type instead, meaning that inevitably some would be missed and bugs introduced. –  Crashworks Jan 12 '12 at 22:18
    
@Crashworks: You have many GetLookup functions? Or many callers of GetLookup? –  Neil G Jan 12 '12 at 22:25
    
Many, many GetLookup() functions. (Or more precisely, many different functions that return a potentially NULL CLookupThingy *.) –  Crashworks Jan 12 '12 at 22:26
    
@Crashworks: I've added a separate answer for that case. –  Neil G Jan 12 '12 at 22:33
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This is a "ticking bomb" only if you are pedantic about the wording of the specification. However, regardless, it is a terrible, ill-advised approach because it obscures a program error. For that reason alone, I would remove it, even if it means considerable work. It is not an immediate (or even middle-term) risk, but it just isn't a good approach.

Such error hiding behavior really isn't something you want to rely on, either. Imagine you rely on this behavior (i.e. it doesn't matter whether my objects are valid, it will work anyway!) and then, by some hazard, the compiler optimizes out the if statement in a particular case because it can prove that this is not a null pointer. That is a legitimate optimization not just for some hypothetical future compiler, but for very real, present-time compilers as well.
But of course, since your program isn't well-formed, it happens that at some point you pass it a null this around 20 corners. Bang, you're dead.
That's very contrieved, admittedly, and it won't happen, but you cannot be 100% certain that it still cannot possibly happen.

Note that when I shout out "remove!", that does not mean the whole lot of them must be removed immediately or in one massive manpower operation. You could remove these checks one by one as you encounter them (when you change something in the same file anyway, avoid recompilations), or just text-search for one (preferrably in a highly used function), and remove that one.

Since you are using GCC, you may be intersted in __builtin_return_address, which may help you remove these checks without massive manpower and totally disrupting the whole workflow and rendering the application entirely unusable.
Before removing the check, modify it to to output the caller's address, and addr2line will tell you the location in your source. That way, you should be able to quickly identify all the locations in the application that are behaving wrongly, so you can fix these.

So instead of

if(!this) return 0;

change one location at a time to something like:

if(!this) { __builtin_printf("!!! %p\n", __builtin_return_address(0)); return 0; }

That lets you identify the invalid call sites for this change while still letting the program "work as intended" (you can also query the caller's caller if needed). Fix every ill-behaved location, one by one. The program will still "work" as normal.
Once no more addresses come up, remove the check alltogether. You might still have to fix one or the other crash if you are unlucky (because it didn't show while you tested), but that should be a very rare thing to happen. In any case, it should prevent your co-worker from shouting at you.
Remove one or two checks per week, and eventually none will be left. Meanwhile, life goes on and nobody notices what you're doing at all.

TL;DR
As for "current versions of GCC", you are fine for non-virtual functions, but of course nobody can tell what a future version might do. I deem it however highly unlikely that a future version will cause your code to break. Not few existing projects have this kind of check (I remember we had literally hundreds of them in Code::Blocks code completion at some time, don't ask me why!). Compiler makers probably don't want to make dozens/hundreds of major project maintainers unhappy on purpose, only to prove a point.
Also, consider the last paragraph ("from a logical point of view"). Even if this check will crash and burn with a future compiler, it will crash and burn anyway.

The if(!this) return; statement is somewhat useless insofar as this cannot ever be a null pointer in a well-formed program (it means you called a member function on a null pointer). This does not mean, of course, that it couldn't possibly happen. But in this case, the program should crash hard or abort with an assertion. Under no conditions should such a program continue silently.
On the other hand, it is perfectly possible to call a member function on an invalid object that happens to be not null. Checking whether this is the null pointer obviously doesn't catch that case, but it is the exact same UB. So, apart from hiding wrong behavior, this check also only detects one half of the problematic cases.

If you are going by the wording of the speficication, using this (which includes checking whether it's a null pointer) is undefined behavior. Insofar, strictly speaking, it is a "time bomb". However, I would not reasonably deem that a problem, both from a practical point of view and from a logical one.

  • From a practical point of view, it doesn't really matter whether you read a pointer that is not valid as long as you do not dereference it. Yes, strictly to the letter, this is not allowed. Yes, in theory someone might build a CPU which will check invalid pointers when you load them, and fault. Alas, this isn't the case, if you're being real.
  • From a logical point of view, assuming that the check will blow up, it still isn't going to happen. For this statement to be executed, the member function must be called, and (virtual or not, inlined or not) is using an invalid this, which it makes available inside the function body. If one illegitimate use of this blows up, the other will, too. Thus, the check is being obsoleted because the program already crashes earlier.


n.b.: This check is very similar to the "safe delete idiom" which sets a pointer to nullptr after deleting it (using a macro or a templated safe_delete function). Presumably, this is "safe" because it doesn't crash deleting the same pointer twice. Some people even add a redundant if(!ptr) delete ptr;.
As you know, operator delete is guaranteed to be a no-op on a null pointer. Which means no more and no less than by setting a pointer to the null pointer, you have successfully eliminated the only chance to detect double deletion (which is a program error that needs to be fixed!). It is not any "safer", but it instead hides incorrect program behavior. If you delete an object twice, the program should crash hard.
You should either leave a deleted pointer alone, or, if you insist on tampering, set it to a non-null invalid pointer (such as the address of a special "invalid" global variable, or a magic value like -1 if you will -- but you should not try to cheat and hide the crash when it is to occur).

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It's my personal opinion that you should fail as early as possible to alert you to problems. In that case, I'd unceremoniously remove each and every occurrence of if(!this) I could find.

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5  
Better: assert(this). –  Ben Voigt Jan 12 '12 at 21:58
7  
So how then do you justify the time spent fixing a previously working library, which now explodes for every user? Is it really worth the risk, time and effort? –  Robert Harvey Jan 12 '12 at 21:58
3  
@Robert : For some definition of "working"... If !this ever evaluates to true it just means there's a bug elsewhere that this was a bandaide on top of; I'd advocate fixing the real bug, and I think that's what this answer is advocating as well. –  ildjarn Jan 12 '12 at 22:03
2  
@ildjarn: The definition of "working" is in the question. Taking out the if(!this!) everywhere would almost certainly produce a library that does not work. –  Robert Harvey Jan 12 '12 at 22:05
3  
I wouldn't want to live with the ambiguity. That's a silent failure that is happening. You need to find that ASAP. –  Mooing Duck Jan 12 '12 at 22:20
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