Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I create a String object from a byte array

byte arr[MAX_SIZE];  // Java

where one of the array elements is a C null terminating byte? Is it as simple as calling

String str = new String( arr );

Will the String constructor know to automatically stop at the null terminating character? Any bytes after the null byte are (possibly) garbage characters that I don't want to include in the string. The last response under Parsing byte array in java suggests looping through the array and manually finding the null terminating character, but I was wondering whether the String constructor will do this automatically. I also assume the system's default charset will be used on all ends.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted
byte arr[] = ...
Charset charset = ...
int i;
for (i = 0; i < arr.length && arr[i] != 0; i++) { }
String str = new String(arr, 0, i, charSet);

Notes:

  • It is generally a good idea to use an explicit CharSet parameter so that your application doesn't depend on the platform's default characterset / encoding.

  • This won't work for some charsets. For instance, a UTF-16 encoded string can't safely be represented as a zero-terminated byte sequence because many code units contain zero bytes. (On the other hand, UTF-8 is OK provided that the string contains no instances of code point zero; see Can UTF-8 contain zero byte?)

... but I was wondering whether the String constructor will do this automatically.

No it / they won't. (Don't "wonder" ... read the javadoc :-))

I also assume the system's default charset will be used on all ends.

If you don't specify a charset, the Java platform's default will be used. This is likely to be the system default, but that is not guaranteed.

share|improve this answer

It won't magically stop at the null terminator. The null character doesn't terminate strings in Java. You will have to find the index of the first null character and stop there. Use the String(byte[] arr, int offset, length) constructor after that.

share|improve this answer
1  
The NULL char is not necessarily toward the end of the array; it can be at any position. –  Phillip Jan 12 '12 at 22:29
    
@BenS no, arr.length - 1 –  sjr Jan 12 '12 at 22:29
    
@Phillip, realised this after reading your question again.. edited my answer –  sjr Jan 12 '12 at 22:30

how about this:

String str = new String(arr).split("\0")[0];
share|improve this answer
2  
Doesn't look too good if the input array is huge, unless you are going to read all the strings anyway. –  sjr Jan 12 '12 at 22:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.