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I have a file that among other things contains entries of the following form:

2012-01-12 22:20:21,638 INFO  [Tracer]
  something.of.interest
  ...some number of additional lines...
<<a blank line>>
...other stuff...

I want to pick out only blocks of text where the first line contains [Tracer] and the second line is contains something.of.interest, ending with a blank line an unknown number of lines after the second line. Changing the format of the file is not an option.

I can use sed to pick out the entire block by doing something similar to:

gsed -n '/^[0-9]\{4\}[^\[]*\[Tracer\]/,/^$/ p' /path/to/file/to/parse

This picks the entire block as intended but it matches entries where the second line doesn't contain something.of.interest.

I can use N to acquire the next line and then match across current and next line, and I can make this work to select the first two lines only when I see both [Tracer] and something.of.interest separated by \n, however I can't seem to figure out how to grab the following lines until I hit a newline. In pseudo-sed I want to do something like this:

/look for Tracer line 1/{
N
/look for \n.*something.of.interest/
},
/look for blank line for end of range/
p

Sadly this doesn't actually work, typically I get and 'unknown command' message.

Is there a way to define a range in sed using patterns where beginning and end could be multi-line patterns?

The solution ultimately needs to operate on Solaris 5.10. GNU sed (gsed) is available, as is awk if that is a better choice in this case.

Suggestions much appreciated.

UPDATE

It seems I can do it in awk, although the result is mildly horrific. I'd very much like a more elegant solution, still for reference here is an awk script that will find the lines of interest:

1) Create a file something.awk, where the first line is the regexp to match line 1:

/\[Tracer\]/ {
  l1=$0
  if (getline <= 0) {
      print "getline failed"
      exit 1
  }
  if (index($0, L2MARKER) > 0) {
      print l1
      print $0
      stop=0
      while(stop != 1) {
         if (getline <= 0) {
            print "getline failed :( ERRNO:" + ERRNO
            exit 1
         }
         print;
         if (length($0) == 0) {
             stop = 1
         }
      }
   }
}

2) Invoke from shell similar to awk -f something.awk L2MARKER='something.of.interest' the.file.to.parse

share|improve this question
    
I doubt this can be done with a one liner using sed and/or awk, as both look at each line in a file and not the file as a whole. This could easily be done in Python or Perl however. –  Yanick Girouard Jan 12 '12 at 22:57
    
Multi-liner is acceptable; Python or Perl very much not preferred as this would make this script the odd man out. –  S42 Jan 12 '12 at 23:02
    
@YanickGirouard Anything white-space-insensitive can be a one-liner ;) But on a serious note, it can (see my answer). Never underestimate the power of awk. –  Kevin Jan 13 '12 at 0:53

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edit: It's been noted my first solution was a little off. Here's an attempt at a fix, though I haven't tested it yet due to lack of place to test it.

I've come up with something that might work for you, in sed:

/Tracer/ { N; /interesting/ { h; :a; n; H; /^$/! ba; g; p } }

An explanation follows!

Given a test file like this:

boring
boring
awesome [Tracer]
interesting
totally interesting
and awesome
still interesting
very interesting

back to boring
awesome [Tracer]
Nah just kidding
nope

darn

The above command expands to the following, with explanation:

/Tracer/ {          # Looks for Tracer
    N               # Moves on to the next line
    /interesting/ { # Looks to see if "interesting" is in the next line
        h           # Put first two lines in hold space
        :a          # Label "a"
        n           # Move on to next line
        H           # Appends line to hold space
        /^$/! ba    # If not a blank line, branch back to "a"
        g           # Put the hold space into the pattern space
        p           # Print the pattern space
    }
}

And, should do it like so:

sed -n '/Tracer/ { h; n; /interesting/ { :a; H; n; /^$/! ba }; g; p }' file.txt
awesome [Tracer]
interesting
totally interesting
and awesome
still interesting
very interesting
[blank line]

Where [blank line] is a literal blank line, but I can't express that in a code block here. Obviously you can modify the regexes for /Tracer/ and /interesting/ easily enough, depending on the specific contents of the lines.

share|improve this answer
1  
Good going on the sed's branching technique! :-) –  jaypal Jan 13 '12 at 0:28
    
As much as I love this, I believe it still prints the [Tracer] line (though nothing past it) if the second line doesn't match. –  Kevin Jan 13 '12 at 0:51
    
@JaypalSingh: Thanks! Just decided to dive in and try. –  Dan Fego Jan 13 '12 at 1:02
    
@Kevin: You were right; I've updated it. –  Dan Fego Jan 13 '12 at 1:02
    
Dan, you are a gentlemen and a scholar; 'gsed -n '/[Tracer]/ { N; /SomethingOfInterest/ { h; :a; n; H; /^$/! ba; g; p } }'' works very nicely for me on Solaris. –  S42 Jan 13 '12 at 22:21

another awk solution

if the block you are gonna extract is always at the top of the file, and there will be only 1 or 0 block in your output:

awk '/\[Tracer\]/{print;f=1;next;} 
{if(NR==2){if(f && $0~/interest/){print;next;} else  exit;} 
if(f && $0) print; else exit;}' file 

if you want to catch more blocks:

awk '/\[Tracer\]/{h=$0;f=1;l=NR;next;} 
{if(NR==l+1){if(f && $0~/interest/){print h;print;} else {f=0;h=""; }next;} 
if(f) if($0)print;else f=0; }' file

test on both above

    #input file, in this case, 1st and 3rd blocks should be 
in your output (for solution 2)
kent$  cat file
2012-01-12 22:20:21,638 INFO  [Tracer]
  interesting
  ...some number of additional lines...
  xxx
  yyy
  zzz

...other stuff...
2012-01-12 22:20:21,638 INFO  [Tracer]
  NOT-wanted-NOT
  ...some number of additional lines...
  xxx####
  yyy####
  zzz####

...other ####  stuff...
2012-01-12 22:20:21,638 INFO  [Tracer]
  interest
  ...some number of additional lines...
  xxxWANTWANTWANT
  yyy.WANTWANTWANT
  zzzoWANTWANTWANT

  blahblah

#solution one:
kent$   awk '/\[Tracer\]/{print;f=1;next;} 
    {if(NR==2){if(f && $0~/interest/){print;next;} else  exit;} 
    if(f && $0) print; else exit;}' file 
2012-01-12 22:20:21,638 INFO  [Tracer]
  interesting
  ...some number of additional lines...
  xxx
  yyy
  zzz

#solution two:
kent$  awk '/\[Tracer\]/{h=$0;f=1;l=NR;next;} 
{if(NR==l+1){if(f && $0~/interest/){print h;print;} else {f=0;h=""; }next;} 
if(f) if($0)print;else f=0; }' file 
2012-01-12 22:20:21,638 INFO  [Tracer]
  interesting
  ...some number of additional lines...
  xxx
  yyy
  zzz
2012-01-12 22:20:21,638 INFO  [Tracer]
  interest
  ...some number of additional lines...
  xxxWANTWANTWANT
  yyy.WANTWANTWANT
  zzzoWANTWANTWANT

hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

Here is yet another awk solution:

awk '/\[Tracer\]/{
a=$0;getline;
if ($0~/something\.of\.interest/) {print a; print$0;getline} else next; 
while ($0!~/^$/) {print $0;getline}}' INPUT_FILE
share|improve this answer

If you can guarantee there is a blank line immediately above the [Tracer] line,

awk 'BEGIN { RS = ""; FS = "\n" } $1 ~ "[Tracer]" && $2 ~ "something.of.interest"' input.file

If not, add a sed to ensure it:

sed 's/\(.*\[Tracer\].*\)/\n\1/' test.in |awk \
    'BEGIN { RS=""; FS="\n" } $1 ~ "[Tracer]" && $2 ~ "something.of.interest"'
share|improve this answer

Sed has a hold space designed for this sort of application:

sed -n '/^[0-9]\{4\}[^\[]*\[Tracer\]/,/^$/H;/^$/{x;/interesting/p;s/.*//g;x;}'
share|improve this answer

This might work for you:

 sed -n '/Tracer/,/^$/{H;//{x;/something.of.interest/p}}' file

Explanation:

  • -n suppress automatic print out i.e. to print out use the p or P command.
  • Restrict the following commands to a range of lines between and including /Tracer/ and /^$.
  • If the lines match the above, append a newline and then the pattern space (PS) to the hold space (HS).H
  • If either of the regexps /Tracer/ or /^$/ match do the following //:
    • swap the PS for the HS x
    • match on /something.of.interest/ and if so print out everything in the HS /.../p

The PS is always appended to the HS between the lines of interest first (H). The first match of // will match the first address i.e. /Tracer/ at this point the HS becomes the PS and the PS becomes the HS. Nothing matches because the /something.of.interest/ has yet to be read in. Because there is no match nothing is printed out but now the HS contains the first address subsequent lines are appended to it till the second address matches. The PS and the HS are swapped and this time/something.of.interest/ matches and all of the lines between /Tracer/ and /^$/ are printed out.

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice!! QQ: What's the two // after H; for? Sorry if trivial, I'm not so good with sed … yet!! :-) –  jaypal Jan 13 '12 at 1:13
    
@JaypalSingh the empty regular expression ‘//’ repeats the last regular expression match, in this case both the start and end address. –  potong Jan 13 '12 at 7:34
    
@potong: But if I replace // with /Tracer/,/^$/, it works differently, and if I replace it with /^$/, it's close but has a newline before everything else. Am I misunderstanding you? –  Dan Fego Jan 13 '12 at 7:37
    
@DanFego I'll put an explanation with the solution. –  potong Jan 13 '12 at 8:35

I reach for Perl for reading text in "paragraph" mode:

perl -00 -ne '
  @lines = split /\n/;
  print if $lines[0] =~ /Tracer/ and $lines[1] =~ /something.of.interest/
'
share|improve this answer

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