Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sample data:

{
    10116079620: {'ip.dst': ['10.1.1.5'], 'ip.src': ['1.2.3.4'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 
    10116882439: {'ip.dst': ['1.2.3.4'], 'ip.src': ['10.1.1.5'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 
    10116080136: {'ip.dst': ['10.10.10.99'], 'ip.src': ['1.2.3.4'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 
    10116884490: {'ip.dst': ['10.10.10.99'], 'ip.src': ['2.3.4.5'], 'alias': ['www.example.com'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 
    10117039635: {'ip.dst': ['2.3.4.5'], 'ip.src': ['10.11.11.50'], 'alias': ['google.com'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 
    10118099993: {'ip.dst': ['1.2.3.4'], 'ip.src': ['10.11.11.49'], 'alias': ['www.google.com'], 'category': ['Misc']},
    10118083243: {'ip.dst': ['10.11.11.49'], 'ip.src': ['4.3.2.1'], 'alias': ['www.google.com'], 'category': ['Misc']}}
}

Goal:

My goal is to search the sample dictionary with a value (IP address) that is known to exist though it is not known if it will appear in ip.dst or ip.src. Once found I want to write the "opposite" (other) IP address to a new list... if the searched address was found in ip.src I want to capture ip.dst and vice versa.

A searched address can be found more than once - the resulting list does not need to reflect duplicates.

If 1.2.3.4 is searched then the following would be captured:
* 10.1.1.5
* 10.10.10.99
* 10.11.11.49

Searching on 10.10.10.99 would capture:
* 1.2.3.4
* 2.3.4.5

This I'm sure is simple yet I am stuck with nasty, nested loops and need a concise routine clearer than my mud.

Your assistance is appreciated.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
3  
Why are the values to the keys 'ip.dst' and 'ip.src' lists? Can they have more than one value? –  Sven Marnach Jan 12 '12 at 23:06
3  
No, they can not have more than one value. Why are they this way? <*scratching head*>That's how the other developer built it.</*scratching head> –  Bit Bucket Jan 12 '12 at 23:26
    
That dictionary seems a little painful to handle, why don't you use an object? –  Rik Poggi Jan 12 '12 at 23:32
    
I think it's a legacy format he needs to parse... –  Cyclone Jan 12 '12 at 23:37

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Step 1. Invert the dictionary.

dst= collections.defaultdict( list )
src= collections.defaultdict( list )
for k in original:
    for addr in original[k]['ip.dst']:
        dst[addr].append( k )
    for addr in original[k]['ip.src']:
        src[addr].append( k )

Step 2. Don't search, just get the value.

You do two nearly instant checks into dst[addr] and src[addr] and you know all the keys in the original dictionary where it occurred.

Inverting the dictionary takes time.

Building better dictionaries in the first place (i.e., indexed by ip.dst and ip.src) saves the cost of inverting the dictionary you already have.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for mentioning defaultdict... It's rare these days that I learn something new in python that is that useful. To think of all the times I used my own 'ListDict' class instead... –  Cyclone Jan 12 '12 at 23:16
    
Yeah, sorry folks about the source data presenting the IPs in lists but I have no control over it. The source data will never have more than one IP in ip.src and .dst. –  Bit Bucket Jan 12 '12 at 23:22
    
@S.Lott - this did the trick, thanks for your support! –  Bit Bucket Jan 17 '12 at 19:22

Just for fun, here's how you can do it in a one-liner comprehension!

set([v['ip.dst'][0] for v in my_dict.values() if v['ip.src'] == [search_ip]] + [v['ip.src'][0] for v in my_dict.values() if v['ip.dst'] == [search_ip]])

Output:

>>>search_ip = '1.2.3.4'
>>>my_dict = {10116079620: {'ip.dst': ['10.1.1.5'], 'ip.src': ['1.2.3.4'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 10116882439: {'ip.dst': ['1.2.3.4'], 'ip.src': ['10.1.1.5'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 10116080136: {'ip.dst': ['10.10.10.99'], 'ip.src': ['1.2.3.4'], 'category': ['Misc']},  10116884490: {'ip.dst': ['10.10.10.99'], 'ip.src': ['2.3.4.5'], 'alias': ['www.example.com'], 'category': ['Misc']},  10117039635: {'ip.dst': ['2.3.4.5'], 'ip.src': ['10.11.11.50'], 'alias': ['google.com'], 'category': ['Misc']},  10118099993: {'ip.dst': ['1.2.3.4'], 'ip.src': ['10.11.11.49'], 'alias': ['www.google.com'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 10118083243: {'ip.dst': ['10.11.11.49'], 'ip.src': ['4.3.2.1'], 'alias': ['www.google.com'], 'category': ['Misc']}}
>>>set([v['ip.dst'][0] for v in my_dict.values() if v['ip.src'] == [search_ip]] + [v['ip.src'][0] for v in my_dict.values() if v['ip.dst'] == [search_ip]])
set(['10.1.1.5', '10.10.10.99', '10.11.11.49'])

>>>search_ip = '10.10.10.99'
>>>set([v['ip.dst'][0] for v in my_dict.values() if v['ip.src'] == [search_ip]] + [v['ip.src'][0] for v in my_dict.values() if v['ip.dst'] == [search_ip]])
set(['1.2.3.4', '2.3.4.5'])
share|improve this answer
2  
Here is a slightly shorter alternative: set([v[a][0] for a, b in [('ip.src','ip.dst'), ('ip.dst','ip.src')] for v in my_dict.values() if v[b] == [search_ip]]) –  Andrew Clark Jan 12 '12 at 23:40
    
yesss, very nice ! –  wim Jan 13 '12 at 0:02

I built on S.Lott's answer with some differences. I used sets to remove duplicates, and I kept the search indices together to better match the answers you suggested you wanted.

import collections

# data = your example data dictionary

index = collections.defaultdict(set)
for key in data:
    datum = data[key]
    for ip in datum['ip.dst']:
        index[ip].update(datum['ip.src'])
    for ip in datum['ip.src']:
        index[ip].update(datum['ip.dst'])

print index['1.2.3.4']
print index['10.10.10.99']

returns:

set(['10.10.10.99', '10.1.1.5', '10.11.11.49'])
set(['1.2.3.4', '2.3.4.5'])
share|improve this answer

Here's a list comprehension where data is your dictionary and ip is what you are searching for:

set(ips[ips[0]==ip] for ips in ((v['ip.dst'][0],v['ip.src'][0]) for v in data.itervalues()) if ip in ips)

share|improve this answer
from functools import partial

def search_row(results, ip, row):
    if row['ip.dst'][0] == ip:
        results.add(row['ip.src'][0])
    if row['ip.src'][0] == ip:
        results.add(row['ip.dst'][0])

def search(ip, data):
    results = set()
    aggregator = partial(search_row, results, ip)
    map(aggregator, data.values())    
    return results

print search('1.2.3.4', data)

print search('10.10.10.99', data)
share|improve this answer

Without any libraries (But S.Lott solution is shorter,better and I loved it lol):

x={
    10116079620: {'ip.dst': ['10.1.1.5'], 'ip.src': ['1.2.3.4'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 
    10116882439: {'ip.dst': ['1.2.3.4'], 'ip.src': ['10.1.1.5'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 
    10116080136: {'ip.dst': ['10.10.10.99'], 'ip.src': ['1.2.3.4'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 
    10116884490: {'ip.dst': ['10.10.10.99'], 'ip.src': ['2.3.4.5'], 'alias': ['www.example.com'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 
    10117039635: {'ip.dst': ['2.3.4.5'], 'ip.src': ['10.11.11.50'], 'alias': ['google.com'], 'category': ['Misc']}, 
    10118099993: {'ip.dst': ['1.2.3.4'], 'ip.src': ['10.11.11.49'], 'alias': ['www.google.com'], 'category': ['Misc']},
    10118083243: {'ip.dst': ['10.11.11.49'], 'ip.src': ['4.3.2.1'], 'alias': ['www.google.com'], 'category': ['Misc']}
}

y=[(i['ip.dst'],i['ip.src']) for i in x.values()]

a,b=zip(*y)

#Looking for
lf=['1.2.3.4']
ips=[]


i=0
for ipsrc in a:
    if ipsrc == lf:
        ips.append(b[i])
    i+=1

i=0
for ipdst in b:
    if ipdst == lf:
        ips.append(a[i])
    i+=1

ips=set(ips)
print(ips)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.