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I have an ASP.NET application written in C# (3.5 framework) where users have provided me with a list of patterns that we have put rules around. I could write code to manually account for each pattern, but would prefer to find a way to use regular expressions (or any method really) to handle them so I can allow the users to create more patterns (following some guidelines of course) in the future.

I will do my best to show exactly what it is I am trying to do. I really appreciate your help.

Here are a few of the patterns:

Pattern 1: Element 1: CxxxxRxxxx Element 2: CxxxxRzzzz Result: Bucket 1

Pattern 2: Element 1: CxxxxRxxxx
Element 2: CxxxxRxxxx Result: Bucket 2

Pattern 3: Element 1: PCxxxxxxxx
Element 2: PCzzzzzzzz Result: Bucket 3

Pattern 4: Element 1: PCxxxxxxxx
Element 2: UxxxxRxxxx Result: Bucket 4

Here's what they mean and how I need to handle them. For starters, all the elements are always 10 characters in length. The alphabetical characters are constant for each pattern. The X's and Z's can be numbers or letters. What the X's and Z's signify in the pattern is whether the other parts of the 2 elements match each other.

For instance, my input data is "C1234R5678" as element 1 and "C1234R9999" for element 2. In this case, the result would be "Bucket 1" since this matches the pattern defined for this condition (the numbers after the "C" match, but the numbers after the "R" do not).

In another example, my input data is "C1234R5678" as element 1 and "C1234R5678" for element 2. In this case, the result would be "Bucket 2" since this matches the pattern defined for this condition (the numbers after the "C" match, and the numbers after the "R" match as well).

In another example, my input data is "PC12345678" as element 1 and "PC87654321" for element 2. In this case, the result would be "Bucket 3" since this matches the pattern defined for this condition (the numbers after the "PC" do not match).

In a final example, my input data is "PC12345678" as element 1 and "U1234R5678" for element 2. In this case, the result would be "Bucket 4" since this matches the pattern defined for this condition (the 4 numbers after the "PC" match the 4 numbers after the U and the last 4 digits of the PC element match the 4 digits after the R of element 2).

As you can see, the patterns can be different in that sometime you are identifying 4 numbers after a letter or a whole run of numbers after a letter.

Thanks for your time.

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can do something like:

For each (Element1,Element2) pair:
    match Element1,Element2 on "(x+|z+)" -> matches1,matches2

    for (i=0;i<min(matches1,matches2);i++) {
        replace 'x+' by '([A-Za-z0-9]{matches1[i].Length})'
        // note: need the brackets here to act as capturing brackets
        // so that backreferences can be used!

        if matches2[i] is 'xxxxx':
            replace 'x+' by '(?!\i)[A-Za-z0--9]{matches2[i].Length}'
        else if matches2[i] is 'zzzzz':
            replace 'z+' by '\i'
    }
    Then replace miscellaneous leftover 'xxxx' by '[A-Za-z0-9]{lengthofmatch}'.

    Then join the new Element1 and Element2 by a delimiter e.g. '-'

This will construct a bunch of strings like:

//Pattern 1
C([A-Za-z0-9]{4})R([A-Za-z0-9]{4})-C(?!\1)[A-Za-z0-9]{4}R\2
//Pattern 2
C([A-Za-z0-9]{4})R([A-Za-z0-9]{4})-C(?!\1)[A-Za-z0-9]{4}R(?!\2)[A-Za-z0-9]{4}
//Pattern 3
PC([A-Za-z0-9]{8})-PC\1
//Pattern 4
PC([A-Za-z0-9]{8})-U(?!\1)[A-Za-z0-9]{4}R[A-Za-z0-9]{4}

Then for each input data append Element1 and Element2 separated by a '-' (e.g. "C1234R5678-C1234R9999") and match against each pattern, and stop at the first match.

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Thank you for your help. I'm trying to implement this code into my own. Starting with using the regular expressions you have provided. I use the following code: string strRegex = @"PC[A-Za-z0-9]{8}-PC\1"; RegexOptions myRegexOptions = RegexOptions.None; Regex myRegex = new Regex(strRegex, myRegexOptions); string strTargetString = @"PC12345678-U1234R5678\n"; I get the following error: Reference to undefined group number 1. –  user295197 Jan 13 '12 at 2:35
    
Ok, after messing with this I am getting results with some tweaks. You both have been very inspirational and have made this task much more easy to undertake than I ever thought possible. Cheers! –  user295197 Jan 13 '12 at 4:02
    
Oh, apologies, each xxx group in Element1 needs capturing brackets around it so that backreference are possible! My bad - updating post. –  mathematical.coffee Jan 13 '12 at 4:05
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One approach would be to concatenate the elements (possibly with a separator that can't appear in an element), so each can be matched by a single regex. Use capturing and backreferences to force later substrings to match earlier. Use negative lookaheads to ensure a substring doesn't match an earlier one; otherwise, you'd have to rely on the order that the patterns were checked to ensure that a pattern matched properly (in the sample, you'd have to check for bucket 2 before bucket 1). Use squiggly bracket quantifiers to match a specific number of characters.

/C(.{4})R\1-C\1R(?!\1).{4}/ -> bucket 1
/C(.{4})R\1-C\1R\1/         -> bucket 2
/PC(.{8})-PC(?!\1).{8}/     -> bucket 3
/PC(.{4})(.{4})-U\1R\2/     -> bucket 4

Instead of the "any" character (the dot), you could restrict the parts to just alphanumeric characters ([A-Za-z\d]) or identifier characters (\w, equivalent to '[A-Za-z\d_]').

Store the mapping in a list, then iterate over the list when figuring out which bucket to use. Additional mappings between patterns and buckets can be appended to the list.

Of course, this would require your users be able to write regexes, though you could come up with a simpler language that gets translated to regexes. For example, you could have users specify just "{n}" and "\k", where the former means match that many characters that shouldn't match any previous group, and the latter means match the kth "{n}". To translate to a regex, replace each "{n}" with "(.{n})" (or "(\w{n})"), prefixing "(?!\k)" for k=1 to n-1. Using sort-of-C#, the replacement could be specified as:

(1..n-1).sum(k => "(?!\\" + k + ")") + "(\\w{"+n+"})"
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I have tried using some of these in code where one should be true and the other false. Right now I'm only getting false for both. string regEx = @"/C(.{4})R\1-C\1R(?!\1).{4}/"; string testSequenceTrue = "C1234R5678-C1234R9999"; string testSequenceFalse = "C1234R5678-C1234R5678"; Regex objCategoryMatchShouldBeTrue = new Regex(regEx); bool isTrue = objCategoryMatchShouldBeTrue.IsMatch(testSequenceTrue); Regex objCategoryMatchShouldBeFalse = new Regex(regEx); bool isFalse = objCategoryMatchShouldBeFalse.IsMatch(testSequenceFalse); –  user295197 Jan 13 '12 at 2:54
    
Ok, after messing with this I am getting results with some tweaks. You both have been very inspirational and have made this task much more easy to undertake than I ever thought possible. Cheers! –  user295197 Jan 13 '12 at 4:03
    
Ack. I wish I could somehow split award this. I used pieces of both to get this working. –  user295197 Jan 13 '12 at 4:05
    
@user295197: while only one answer can be accepted, you can up-vote as many answers as you find useful. Note the complete regexes given aren't C# strings, so the backslash isn't escaped. As you probably discovered, when you put an RE in a string, you need to deal with string escapes and remove the RE delimiters. –  outis Jan 13 '12 at 5:02
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