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Anybody know why this is not possible? If the event is just a MulticastDelegate instance you should be able to reference it in the code. the compiler says EventA can only be on left side of -= or +=.

public delegate void MyDelegate();
public event MyDelegate EventA;

public void addHandlerToEvent(MulticastDelegate md,Delegate d){
 md+=d;

}

///
addHandlerToEvent(EventA,new MyDelegate(delegate(){}));
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

An event is not a multicast delegate, just like a property is not a field.

C#'s event syntax wraps multicast delegates to make life easier by providing syntactic sugar for adding and removing handler delegates. Your event definition would be compiled to the following:

private MyDelegate _EventA;

public event MyDelegate EventA
{
    [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)]
    add 
    { 
        _EventA = (MyDelegate)Delegate.Combine(_EventA, value);
    }

    [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)]
    remove 
    { 
        _EventA = (MyDelegate)Delegate.Remove(_EventA, value);
    }
}

The add and remove methods within the expanded event definition are then called when you use operator += and operator -= on the event.

This is done in order to hide the internals of the multicast delegate, but expose a simple way to implement publishing/subscribing to events. Being able to get the underlying delegate (outside of the class where it's defined) would break that intentional encapsulation.

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An event is a member which binds a pair of add/remove methods(*), each of which accepts a delegate corresponding to the event signature. By default, the C# compiler will for each event auto-define a MultiCast delegate field along with add and remove members which will take the passed-in delegate and add or remove them to/from that MulticastDelegate field. The statement myEvent += someMethod;, when performed outside the class defining the event, is the required syntactic shorthand for, essentially myEvent.AddHandler(someMethod), and myEvent -= someMethod; for myEvent.RemoveHandler(someMethod), except that there is no way in C# to call the add/remove methods except using the += and -= notation.

Things are a little tricky when using the += and -= notation within the class which defines an event, since the field defined by the auto-generated event code has the same name as the event, and the behavior of myEvent += someMethod; will vary with different versions of C#.

(*) Technically a trio, since an event also includes a 'raise' method, but in practice that method is essentially never used.

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Events are backed by multicast delegates, yes, but their purpose is to provide an implementation of the observer pattern, where observers (delegates in this case) may only be registered (+=) or unregistered (-=). If normal access to the backing delegate were possible outside the class itself, then it would be possible for client code to interfere with an unrelated delegate that was registered elsewhere, which could mess things up. It's also somewhat beside the point of the observer pattern to look at which other things are observing the event in question.

If you need to perform this kind of manipulation of the backing delegate, it must be done within the class (where it's treated as a regular delegate rather than an event).

You can also implement the backing delegate explicitly and provide an accessor to register/unregister with it:

private EventHandler SomeEvent;

public event EventHandler
{
    add
    {
        SomeEvent += value;
    }
    remove
    {
        SomeEvent -= value;
    }
}

This way you can provide direct access to the delegate if you need to. It's still best to provide public access to it for the purposes of subscribing/unsubscribing as an event though (rather than a raw delegate), otherwise you can run into thread-safety problems with data races on the delegates.

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