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I want design a flag enum but shared by two use cases:

  • Use case 1: to store yes/no answer.
  • User case 2: to store multiple choice answer.

For example: I have defined the following

[Flags]
public enum Answer
{
    Yes = 1, 
    No = 2,
    Choice1 = 1,
    Choice2 = 2,
    Choice3 = 4,
    Choice4 = 8,
}

The reason to combine this is to share a consistent interface(e.g. process answer). Are there any arguments against this design? Thanks!

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1  
Yes/No and multiple choice answers are different things. Thus, they should be represented by a different value. What's wrong with public enum MultipleChoiceAnswer and public enum YesNoAnswer? Trying to overload a single enum with multiple meanings is creating more confusion than it solves, and enums with invalid potential values violates every kind of design guideline out there. Worse yet, it's not something the compiler is going to catch for you, and all errors should be caught at compile time when possible. –  Cody Gray Jan 13 '12 at 1:00
    
@Cody, very good point. One example API is bool IsAnswerCorrect(Answer userAnser, Answer correctAnswer), can we simplify to use only one API? The logic behind this may be not just a simple compare but something using flags. –  Icerman Jan 13 '12 at 6:10
    
Just use method overloading. Completely transparent to the consumer of the API. –  Cody Gray Jan 13 '12 at 9:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
[Flags]
public enum Answer
{
    No = 0, 
    Choice1 = 1,
    Choice2 = 2,
    Choice3 = 4,
    Choice4 = 8,
    Yes = 0x80000000,
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't Yes/No "make more sense" the other way? I still don't particularly like it: also the removal of [Flags] means that Choice1+Choice2 can't be selected, which it looked like was the intended case... –  user166390 Jan 12 '12 at 23:42
    
@pst Updated my answer with your feedback. –  Eugen Rieck Jan 12 '12 at 23:47
    
+1. I think this is a better solution (using different values). –  Icerman Jan 12 '12 at 23:51
2  
Just one concern, based on msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229062.aspx: Avoid creating flags enumerations when certain combinations of values are invalid. Maybe this is not a bad trade-off? –  Icerman Jan 12 '12 at 23:56
    
Certain combinations being invalid is not a property of this enum, but of your design choice to put yes/no and choiceN into the same enum. I personally wouldn't hesitate to accept this tradeoff, as long as all code that uses the enum is controlled by me. Exporting this enum to third-party code is a showstopper though. –  Eugen Rieck Jan 13 '12 at 9:01

I wouldn't do this. Here's why:

class Program
    {
        [Flags]
        public enum Answer
        {
            Yes = 1,
            No = 2,
            Choice1 = 1,
            Choice2 = 2,
            Choice3 = 4,
            Choice4 = 8,
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            int SomeInt = (int)Answer.Choice1;

            Console.WriteLine((Answer)SomeInt);

            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }

The result of that is

"Yes"

It makes sense, and obviously it is syntactically correct, but you are making it very hard to maintain an enumeration like that. It is going to match on the first correct value of the enumeration. That is logic that I believe can be improved upon so that confusion is limited/eliminated.

Would I do this? No.

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How is it "obviously ... correct" if it's "making [the code] very hard to maintain"? Those statements do not go together in my book. –  user166390 Jan 12 '12 at 23:41
    
@pst I edited. I meant it is correct by syntax and will compile. You are right, it makes it hard to maintain code like that. But I am pointing out that just because it can be done doesn't mean it should. –  user596075 Jan 12 '12 at 23:43
    
I can see sharing value is bad. What about Eugen's suggustion? –  Icerman Jan 12 '12 at 23:49

1) If you want to check whether the question is being answered or not then you can check for value 1 (if the value 1 Means it is not answered). 2) If any of the choices is set then you can assume that your answered is being answered.

public enum Answer {
  No = 1,     
  Choice1 = 2,     
  Choice2 = 3,     
  Choice3 = 4,     
  Choice4 = 8
} 

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work if selecting Choice1+Choice2 is an option. –  user166390 Jan 12 '12 at 23:45
    
How many choices(maximum) can you select at any point of time? If you want multiple choices to be selected like Choice1 and Choice2 then only way is you can create more enum entries like choice12 = 5, choice13 = 6 –  Senthil Jan 12 '12 at 23:49
    
Not my purpose. My purpose is two types of quesitons. –  Icerman Jan 12 '12 at 23:50

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