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public interface IPlugin
{
    void Execute();
}

public class FirstPlugin : IPlugin
{
    public string SomeSetting1 { get; set; }

    public void Execute() { }
}

public class SecondPlugin : IPlugin
{
    public string SomeSettingA { get; set; }
    public string SomeSettingB { get; set; }
    public string SomeSettingC { get; set; }

    public void Execute() { }
}

I have a system that allows usesr to select one or more plugins. In the code above, I have an IPlugin interface that is implemented by many classes. Each class can have their own set of properties and each user can configure those properties.

For example, User A selects only the first plugin and configures SomeSetting1 to have a value of "ABC".

User B selects both plugins, but configures the first plugin's SomeSetting1 to have a value of "XYC".

public class User
{
    public User(IPlugin[] plugins)
    {
    }
}

When I instantiate a user, I want to get a list of plugins that the user has configured and those plugins should be hydrated with what the user has configured.

However, I'm drawing a blank on how to design the database to be able to store information in this format. I could have a table:

User  |  Plugin
----------------
A     |  ...
B     |  ...
B     |  ...

... where the plugin column would be the serialized representation of the plugin that I can deserialize back into a class. However, that seems like a terrible/hacky idea. Is there a better way to do this?

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2 Answers 2

If you don't have to query database by some of the properties serialized in Plugin column, I don't see it as a terrible/hacky idea. Also...you might consider using some non-schema database like mongodb. Anyway, I would do it with serializing (probably JSON object, if I will later consume that result from javascript, or some XML if that is more appropriate for your environment).

If you want to stay with more relational approach...then you will have a table with plugin properties...with columns: UserId, PluginId, PropertyName, PropertyValue...then, table with Plugins: PluginId, PluginName, and your table with users: UserId,...and some columns for users (this is just one way to design it) The problem is if you have some plugin properties that are complex objects...in that case, you will have to serialize them into PropertyValue column...

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EAV is not a really a "pure relational design" in that the PropertyValue column ends up being pretty typeless, and it's difficult to manage constraints. But for a flexible database design, it's one of few options. It's not really too much better than an XML blob, though. –  Cade Roux Jan 13 '12 at 1:21
    
Agree...but if he wants to find something like: give me all users who set Property1 of Plugin1 to "val1", then it is the only way to go with relational database (of course, if he is using relational database and not something like mongodb). Anyway, I've modified my answer: "pure relational design"=>"more relational approach" –  Aleksandar Vucetic Jan 13 '12 at 1:23

Tables

User
-----
UserID
Name

Plugin
------
PluginID
PluginName

PlugInProperty   
------------------
PlugInPropertyId
PluginID

UserPlugin
------------
UserPluginId
UserId
PluginId

UserPlugInProperty
------------------
UserPluginId
PlugInPropertyId
Value
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