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I want this to tell me the Name of both ItemA and ItemB. It should tell me "Subitem\nSubitem", but instead it tells me "Item\nSubitem". This is because the "Name" variable defined in the Subitem class is technically a different variable than the "Name" variable defined in the base Item class. I want to change the original variable to a new value. I don't understand why this isn't the easiest thing ever, considering virtual and override work perfectly with methods. I've been completely unable to find out how to actually override a variable.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace Example
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            System.Console.WriteLine(ItemA.Name);
            System.Console.WriteLine(ItemB.Name);
            System.Console.ReadKey();
        }
        static Item ItemA = new Subitem();
        static Subitem ItemB = new Subitem();
    }
    public class Item
    {
        public string Name = "Item";
    }
    public class Subitem : Item
    {
        new public string Name = "Subitem";
    }
}
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1  
You need something that can be virtual -- a Property ("Getter") or a Method. Member variables are never virtual. –  user166390 Jan 13 '12 at 1:11
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You cannot override variables in C#, but you can override properties:

public class Item
{
    public virtual string Name {get; protected set;}
}
public class Subitem : Item
{
    public override string Name {get; protected set;}
}

Another approach would be to change the value in the subclass, like this:

public class Item
{
    public string Name = "Item";
}
public class Subitem : Item
{
    public Subitem()
    {
        Name = "Subitem";
    }
}
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1  
@Eagle-Eye What would polymorphic variables do? Don't criticise the practice if you can't articulate the theory. –  Jon Hanna Jan 13 '12 at 2:17
    
+1 to Jon, @Eagle-Eye. Given that polymorphism is about substituting functionality in derived types, applying it to something like fields (which have no functionality) does not make sense. –  Adam Robinson Jan 13 '12 at 3:50
    
@Jon Rereading my comment now it was a bit stupid to say. What I really meant was that I wish I could set the default value of a variable within a child class without having it in the constructor (since I came from a scripting language where that was how it was done). I did a poor job of expressing that previously. However, what does "don't criticise the practice if you can't articulate the theory" even mean? As far as "the other methods seem stupid and hacky," I was referring to my making a get method simply to have a separate default value. (I do regret the use of the word stupid, however.) –  Eagle-Eye Dec 28 '12 at 9:56
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There is no concept of polymorphism (which is what makes override do its thing) with fields (what you call a variables). What you need to use here instead is a property.

public class Item
{
    public virtual string Name
    {
        get { return "Item"; }
    }
}

public class SubItem : Item
{
    public override string Name
    {
        get { return "Subitem"; }
    }
}
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1  
Though he probably wouldn't hardcode the values like that, it may vary. –  Jeff Mercado Jan 13 '12 at 1:11
    
Absolutely correct. A "virtual variable" makes no sense. Which is a large part of why Java-style "getter()" and "setter()" methods are so useful. And C#'s notion of "properties" (an advance from Delphi's already-very-good "properties") eliminates much of the need for getter/setter methods. "Properties" is definitely the answer to this question. See also this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/1112458/… –  paulsm4 Jan 13 '12 at 1:14
1  
@JeffMercado: While true, I was trying to stick as closely to the original form of the OP's question so as to demonstrate the distinction I'm talking about (properties vs. fields). –  Adam Robinson Jan 13 '12 at 1:15
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What would "overriding a variable" mean?

A variable is a named location in conceptual memory ("conceptual", because it could be a register, though not very likely with fields).

Overriding a method substitutes one set of operations for another.

Since a named location in memory isn't a set of operations, how can you substitute it? What are things that expect to use that named location in memory supposed to do?

If you want to change what is stored in the memory, then just do so when the derived class is constructed:

public class Item
{
  public string Name = "Item";
}
public class Subitem : Item
{
  public SubItem()
  {
    Name = "Subitem";
  }
}

If you want to override as set of operations, then define a set of operations (a method or property) to override.

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A possible solution would be to use a property and override its getter, like so:

public class Item
{
    public virtual string Name { get { return "Item"; } }
}
public class Subitem : Item
{
    public override string Name { get { return "Subitem"; } }
}
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