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How can I round values like this:

1.1 => 1
1.5 => 2
1.9 => 2

Math.Ceiling() is not helping me. Any ideas?

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2  
Use Math.Round –  ean5533 Jan 13 '12 at 1:13
    
Math.Round() can do the trick. –  Only Bolivian Here Jan 13 '12 at 1:13
    
Something like Math.Round? –  M.Babcock Jan 13 '12 at 1:13
    
possible duplicate of How to round up value C# to the nearest integer? –  Alex Angas Jan 20 at 1:03

9 Answers 9

up vote 58 down vote accepted

See the official documentation for more. For example:

Basically you give the Math.Round method three parameters.

  1. The value you want to round.
  2. The number of decimals you want to keep after the value.
  3. An optional parameter you can invoke to use AwayFromZero rounding. Without it, '1.5' rounds to '1' instead of '2'.

Sample code:

var roundedA = Math.Round(1.1, 0); // Output: 1
var roundedB = Math.Round(1.5, 0, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero); // Output: 2
var roundedC = Math.Round(1.9, 0); // Output: 2

You need MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero is you want a .5 value to be rounded up. Unfortunately this isn't the default behavior for Math.Round().

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5  
+1 for actually explaining a huge caveat for using Round –  ta.speot.is Jan 13 '12 at 1:27
9  
on the other hand, using away from zero also means that -1.5 will round to -2. –  davogotland Jan 13 '12 at 1:35
    
use Math.Ceiling, its not a good practice to use Math.Round for frictions, read: stackoverflow.com/questions/9221205/…, –  Yakir Manor Sep 16 '13 at 11:27
1  
I am finding that Math.Round(1.5, 0) returns 2 –  David Sykes Jan 20 at 13:45
Math.Ceiling

always rounds up (towards the ceiling)

Math.Floor

always rounds down (towards to floor)

what you are after is simply

Math.Round

which rounds as per this post

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You need Math.Round, not Math.Ceiling. Ceiling always "rounds" up, while Round rounds up or down depending on the value after the decimal point.

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You can use Math.Round as others have suggested (recommended), or you could add 0.5 and cast to an int (which will drop the decimal part).

double value = 1.1;
int roundedValue = (int)(value + 0.5); // equals 1

double value2 = 1.5;
int roundedValue2 = (int)(value2 + 0.5); // equals 2
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You have the Math.Round function that does exactly what you want.

Math.Round(1.1) results with 1
Math.Round(1.8) will result with 2.... and so one.
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1  
What about 1.5 as the value? You need more parameters. –  Only Bolivian Here Jan 13 '12 at 1:27

Use Math.Round:

double roundedValue = Math.Round(value, 0)
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there's this manual, and kinda cute way too:

double d1 = 1.1;
double d2 = 1.5;
double d3 = 1.9;

int i1 = (int)(d1 + 0.5);
int i2 = (int)(d2 + 0.5);
int i3 = (int)(d3 + 0.5);

simply add 0.5 to any number, and cast it to int (or floor it) and it will be mathematically correctly rounded :D

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Does it also work for 1.0? :/ –  ver Nov 17 '12 at 20:02
1  
yes. 1.0 + 0.5 = 1.5. 1.5 rounded down is 1 :) –  davogotland Nov 18 '12 at 4:30
    
It still looks suspicious. Firstly, the question asks about rounding up and secondly, when I tried it just now, the default implementation of Math.Round(1.5) rounds to 2. So this may not be what he wanted. –  ver Nov 20 '12 at 7:46
    
also, your example mixes decimal point with decimal comma. Which one do you normally use (in Sweden, I guess)? :) –  ver Nov 20 '12 at 7:48
    
oops... oh yeah, sorry. in programming the decimal point of course, but in formal text we use the decimal comma. and yes, sweden ^^ about the question, and the "rounding up" part: i think that's just some language mistake. in the examples given by op, some decimal numbers round down. –  davogotland Nov 20 '12 at 18:09

this will round up to the nearest 5 or not change if it already is divisible by 5

public static double R(double x)
{
    // markup to nearest 5
    return (((int)(x / 5)) * 5) + ((x % 5) > 0 ? 5 : 0);
}
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I was looking for this, but my example was to take a number, such as 4.2769 and drop it in a span as just 4.3. Not exactly the same, but if this helps:

Model.Statistics.AverageReview   <= it's just a double from the model

Then:

@Model.Statistics.AverageReview.ToString("n1")   <=gives me 4.3
@Model.Statistics.AverageReview.ToString("n2")   <=gives me 4.28

etc...

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