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I'm trying to put together a query that will retrieve the statistics of a user (profit/loss) as a cumulative result, over a period of time.

Here's the query I have so far:

SELECT p.name, e.date, 
    sum(sp.payout) OVER (ORDER BY e.date)
    - sum(s.buyin) OVER (ORDER BY e.date) AS "Profit/Loss" 
FROM result r 
    JOIN game g ON r.game_id = g.game_id 
    JOIN event e ON g.event_id = e.event_id 
    JOIN structure s ON g.structure_id = s.structure_id 
    JOIN structure_payout sp ON g.structure_id = sp.structure_id
                            AND r.position = sp.position 
    JOIN player p ON r.player_id = p.player_id 
WHERE p.player_id = 17 
GROUP BY p.name, e.date, e.event_id, sp.payout, s.buyin
ORDER BY p.name, e.date ASC

The query will run. However, the result is slightly incorrect. The reason is that an event can have multiple games (with different sp.payouts). Therefore, the above comes out with multiple rows if a user has 2 results in an event with different payouts (i.e. there are 4 games per event, and a user gets £20 from one, and £40 from another).

The obvious solution would be to amend the GROUP BY to:

GROUP BY p.name, e.date, e.event_id

However, Postgres complains at this as it doesn't appear to be recognizing that sp.payout and s.buyin are inside an aggregate function. I get the error:

column "sp.payout" must appear in the GROUP BY clause or be used in an aggregate function

I'm running 9.1 on Ubuntu Linux server.
Am I missing something, or could this be a genuine defect in Postgres?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You are not, in fact, using aggregate functions. You are using window functions. That's why PostgreSQL demands sp.payout and s.buyin to be included in the GROUP BY clause.

By appending an OVER clause, the aggregate function sum() is turned into a window function, which does not aggregate rows.

You can combine window functions and aggregate functions. Aggregations will be applied first. I did not understand from your description how you want to handle multiple payouts / buyins per event. So, as a guess, I calculate a sum of them per event. Now I can drop sp.payout and s.buyin from the GROUP BY clause and get one row per player and event:

SELECT p.name
      ,e.event_id
      ,e.date
      ,sum(sum(sp.payout)) OVER w - sum(sum(s.buyin)) OVER w AS "Profit/Loss" 
FROM   result r 
JOIN   game              g ON r.game_id = g.game_id 
JOIN   event             e ON g.event_id = e.event_id 
JOIN   structure         s ON g.structure_id = s.structure_id 
JOIN   structure_payout sp ON g.structure_id = sp.structure_id
                          AND r.position = sp.position 
JOIN   player            p on r.player_id = p.player_id 
WHERE  p.player_id = 17 
GROUP  BY p.name, e.event_id
WINDOW w AS (ORDER BY p.name, e.date, e.event_id)
ORDER  BY p.name, e.date, e.event_id

In this construct: sum(sum(sp.payout)) OVER w, the outer sum() is a window function, the inner sum() is an aggregate function.

I included p.name and e.event_id in the ORDER BY of the window to arrive at an unambiguous sort order. Also included event_id in the result to distinguish multiple events per day.

You may also have noticed that I removed e.date from the GROUP BY clause. Assuming that e.event_id is the primary key, you don't have to include e.date, too - since PostgreSQL 9.1.

share|improve this answer
    
The first query is working, however, the output of the query isn't giving the required results. I can see what amendment would work in theory, but Postgres doesn't like it. I'll try the above later and let you know. however, it looks like there will be 2 rows in the output of your query if an "event_id" has more than one "payout" amount. –  Martin Jan 13 '12 at 9:33
    
I just tried it with the amendments you've suggested, and it does come back with multiple rows where there are multiple sp.payout values for a single event_id. –  Martin Jan 13 '12 at 13:26
    
@Martin: See my amended answer. –  Erwin Brandstetter Jan 13 '12 at 15:56
    
Yup, that did it... thanks... –  Martin Jan 13 '12 at 21:06

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