Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to "cap" a number in Ruby (on Rails).

For instance, I have, as a result of a function, a float but I need an int.

I have very specific instructions, here are some examples:

If I get 1.5 I want 2 but if I get 2.0 I want 2 (and not 3)

Doing number.round(0) + 1 won't work.

I could write a function to do this but I am sure one already exists.

If, nevertheless, it does not exist, where should I create my cap function?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 47 down vote accepted

Try ceil:

 1.5.ceil => 2
 2.0.ceil => 2
share|improve this answer
2  
1.1.ceil => 2 (another example) –  Patrick Mar 8 at 4:33

How about number.ceil?

This returns the smallest Integer greater than or equal to number.

Be careful if you are using this with negative numbers, make sure it does what you expect:

1.5.ceil      #=> 2
2.0.ceil      #=> 2
(-1.5).ceil   #=> -1
(-2.0).ceil   #=> -2
share|improve this answer

Use Numeric#ceil:

irb(main):001:0> 1.5.ceil
=> 2
irb(main):002:0> 2.0.ceil
=> 2
irb(main):003:0> 1.ceil
=> 1
share|improve this answer

.ceil is good, but remember, even smallest value in float will cause this:

a = 17.00000000000002
17.0
a.ceil
18
share|improve this answer

Don't get it. I see in the core documentation that there is a round() method in the Float class.

flt.round => integer

Rounds flt to the nearest integer. Equivalent to:

def round
    return (self+0.5).floor if self > 0.0
    return (self-0.5).ceil  if self < 0.0
    return 0    
end

1.5.round      #=> 2    (-1.5).round   #=> -2
share|improve this answer
1  
1.2.round => 1, OP wants the answer 2 –  Patrick McDonald May 19 '09 at 21:00

float.ceil is what you want for positive numbers. Be sure to consider the behavior for negative numbers. That is, do you want -1.5 to "cap" to -1 or -2?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.