Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
                int j = (1024 * 1024); // = 1 megabyte
                char[] buffer = new char[j];
                int charsRead = 0;
                while ((charsRead = sr.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
                {
                    string john = new string(buffer, 0, charsRead);
                    sw.WriteLine(john);                        
                }

This is my first experience with using a buffer, and the above code does what I want, EXCEPT for the fact that the end of the buffer does not coincide with the end of the lines in the text file being read from. This results in what you see below. Keep in mind that because each line in the source file is potentially a different length, the break doesn't always occur in the same location in the line:

john likes to farm cattle
john likes to farm beetles
john likes to farm rabbits
john likes to farm carrots
john likes to farm b      <---1MB buffer ends here
ears                      <---new 1MB buffer begins here
john likes to farm antelope
john likes to farm rabies
john likes to farm lions

So is there a way to have a buffer of a specified size (1MB in this example), but only up to the end of the last line before 1MB is reached (so the buffer would most likely always be slightly less than 1MB in size)? I'm guessing part of that process would involve defining what exactly a line is (luckily I know how to do this now), but after that I don't know what I would need to do.

The only solution I can think of would be to go through after the contents of the buffer have been written to the file and search for incomplete lines and re-join them with the lines they were broken from. This seems really inefficient though.

edit: I forgot to include the format of the source file being read from:

john likes to farm cattle
john likes to farm beetles
john likes to farm rabbits
john likes to farm carrots
john likes to farm bears
john likes to farm antelope
john likes to farm rabies
john likes to farm lions
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The most obvious solution (in my opinion) would be to have the strings in your buffer contain the newline (and keep it when they are read) and use Write instead of WriteLine.

share|improve this answer
    
That didn't occur to me, thanks. –  Brian Snow Jan 13 '12 at 2:51
    
Agreed. Presumably the newlines are already in the buffer since lines before the end of the buffer look correct. –  Mike W Jan 13 '12 at 2:54
1  
You might want to drop your buffer size down to about 4KiB as well. Smaller means more frequent calls, but larger means more memory use including a lot more calls out to main memory. Around 4KiB hits the sweet spot for a lot of current machines. –  Jon Hanna Jan 13 '12 at 3:20
    
@ Jon Thanks, I'll change the buffer size and see how that works. –  Brian Snow Jan 13 '12 at 22:36

First of all: why don't you simply use Write instead of WriteLine?

First off, there is absolutely no way that you can do this without overreading, even if you read one char at a time: if you have 50 bytes of capacity left, do you start reading a new line? If not, you might end up with unused capacity; otherwise, you will have read 50 bytes worth of data that you can't use on the spot.

So you might as well read up to the buffer's capacity no matter what. But then you have to decide what to do with the extraneous characters.

One option would be to simply return a smaller buffer up to the last line, discard the extra characters and "rewind" the input stream so that the next read starts from the beginning of the half-read line. However, this is going to be slow (you have to copy the buffer to a slightly smaller buffer before handing it back) and could also be infeasible (what if the input stream does not support rewinding?).

As you see, how exactly you should handle this is not a simple choice and it would depend on what you are trying to accomplish. Which would have to be more complicated than copying from a stream to another.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually this is quite possible if you're using a FileStream. You can Seek to a position that is the length of the buffer and then read backwards to the first new line character found. Not a great plan but it is possible. –  David Clarke Jan 13 '12 at 2:58
    
@DavidClarke: But the thing is, usually you don't want to assume that it's specifically a FileStream or MemoryStream or whatnot. And there are streams that can't rewind. –  Jon Jan 13 '12 at 3:29
    
No argument, just pointing out that it is supported –  David Clarke Jan 13 '12 at 6:32

Instead of using StreamWriter.WriteLine when you write out the buffer, use StreamWriter.Write. StreamWriter.WriteLine will append a new line character which is why you are getting a break in the file.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.