Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This code gives me a seg fault, but when I change the x-- to --x it prints correctly.

Are not they the same????

int main()
{    
    myFunc(5); 
    return 0;
}

void myFunc (int x) {  
    if (x > 0) {
        myFunc(x--);
        printf("%d, ", x);
    }
    else
        return;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Aha a case of stack overflow!! –  another.anon.coward Jan 13 '12 at 3:52
    
@another.anon.coward Surprisingly no in this case. MSVC is able to treat this is a tail-recursion... EDIT: I take that back. You have to move the printf() to the start of the function call (as in my answer) to get it to be a tail-recursion. –  Mysticial Jan 13 '12 at 3:54
    
@Mysticial: Oh ... but generally isn't infinite recursion one of the common causes for stack overflow? As you have said, maybe the compiler optimizes this case into a tail recursion –  another.anon.coward Jan 13 '12 at 3:58
add comment

4 Answers

No they are not the same.

The difference between x-- and --x is whether the returned value is before or after the decrement.

In myFunc(x--), x-- returns the old value. So myFunc() gets called repeatability with the same value -> infinite recursion.

In myFunc(--x), --x returns the new value. So myFunc() gets called with a decreasing number each time -> no infinite recursion.


It will be easier to see this if you moved your printf to the start of the function call:

void myFunc (int x) {  
    printf("%d, ", x);

    if (x > 0) {
        myFunc(x--);

    }
    else
        return;
}

Output: (when called with 10)

10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, ...
share|improve this answer
    
ah hah! thank you I understand now –  camel-man Jan 13 '12 at 3:50
add comment

The post-decrement operation (x--) takes place after the argument is evaluated, so myFunc is repeatedly called with the same value. The pre-decrement (--x) operation takes place before the argument is evaluated, which works as expected.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Because the modification of -- is either post or pre. When you call x-- it is post, and therefore runs after myFunc is called, in this case doing nothing. --x will be called before myFunc and therefore will affect x.

share|improve this answer
add comment

x-- decrements the variable after the use. This is the reason why you pass to your function always the same value, that should be decreased, but doesn't, as well as the function repeats itself.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.