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I am building a class that has a union for its matrix data, however, I can only get it compile when I do not have a name for the struct\union. However, with a higher level warning level (four on visual studio) I will a warning saying

warning C4201: nonstandard extension used : nameless struct/union

I looked into it, and I don't seem to be able to find a way to prevent this. Anyway possible that I know of will cause a different compiler error related to the declaration of one or the other. How can I prevent getting this warning and make it conform to standards, without just disabling the warning.

    union
    {
        struct
        {
            F32 _11, _12, _13, _14;
            F32 _21, _22, _23, _24;
            F32 _31, _32, _33, _34;
            F32 _41, _42, _43, _44;
        };
        F32 _m[16];
    };

(Yes, I know there is matric libraries available. Please do not turn this into a "use xxx library" discussion, I am doing this to expand my knowledge of C++".)

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For the benefit of future readers, can you show your code that names the struct and doesn't compile? –  Keith Thompson Jan 13 '12 at 5:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Naming it seems best. Anonymous unions are allowed in C++, just not structs.

union
{
    struct foo
    {
        F32 _11, _12, _13, _14;
        F32 _21, _22, _23, _24;
        F32 _31, _32, _33, _34;
        F32 _41, _42, _43, _44;
    } bar;
    F32 _m[16];
};

You can use references/macros to allow access without bar.

F32& _11 = bar._11;
F32& _12 = bar._12;

Essentially the same as an anonymous struct. I don't really recommend this though. Use bar._11 if possible.


Private/public (sorta):

struct mat 
{
  struct foo 
  {
    friend class mat;
    private:
      F32 _11, _12, _13, _14;
      F32 _21, _22, _23, _24;
      F32 _31, _32, _33, _34;
      F32 _41, _42, _43, _44;
  };
  union
  {
    foo bar;
    F32 _m[16];
  };
};
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That seems to do it. Although not part of the original question, is there a way to make bar protected\private while still allowing _m to be public? –  mmurphy Jan 13 '12 at 5:09
1  
@mmurphy See my update. It's somewhat possible. –  Pubby Jan 13 '12 at 5:16
    
Oh ok, interesting. One last thing, I looked into using references (I would like to use _11 if possible, without the prefix on it). How could the reference be declared in the class? Something such as "F32& _11 = bar._11;" can't just be in public:. –  mmurphy Jan 13 '12 at 5:57

If all you want to do is to disable the warning without changing the actual code then you can use #pragma warning directive like so:

#pragma warning(disable : 4201)

If you want to reenable it again use:

#pragma warning(default : 4201)

For addition reference, see MSDN documentation.

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Sorry, I should have been more specific and said without just disabling the warning –  mmurphy Jan 13 '12 at 4:59

You have this warning not about the inner struct but about union itself. Try this:

union Mat    // <-------
{
    struct
    {
        F32 _11, _12, _13, _14;
        F32 _21, _22, _23, _24;
        F32 _31, _32, _33, _34;
        F32 _41, _42, _43, _44;
    };
    F32 _m[16];
};

Mat mat;
mat._11 = 42;
F32 x = mat._22;
mat._m[ 3 ] = mat._33;
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