Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
package com.nex.test;

import java.util.Random;

public class RandomNum {

public void RandomNums() {
    int i = 0;
    Random r = new Random(100);
    while (i < 10) {
        int x = r.nextInt() / 1000000;
        if (x > 0) {
            System.out.println("Plus" + r.nextInt() / 1000000);
        } else {
            System.out.println("Minus" + r.nextInt() / 1000000);
        }
        i++;

        }

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new RandomNum().RandomNums();
    }
}

output here...

Minus-1139
Plus-1220
Minus118
Minus1301
Minus-1279
Minus1068
Plus1147
Plus464
Minus-816
Minus1232
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Mark Peters, Perception, Harry Joy, jitter, tim_yates Jan 13 '12 at 12:41

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
What is your question? –  Evan Teran Jan 13 '12 at 6:47
    
I meant that it doesnt works that of { if (x > 0) { System.out.println("Plus" + r.nextInt() / 1000000); } else { System.out.println("Minus" + r.nextInt() / 1000000); } } –  user1089146 Jan 13 '12 at 7:02

3 Answers 3

OK, I think your question is "why is it sometimes printing negative numbers for "Plus" and positive numbers for "Negative", right?

Well the reason is because when you attempt to print the numbers:

    int x = r.nextInt() / 1000000;
    if (x > 0) {
        System.out.println("Plus" + r.nextInt() / 1000000);
    } else {
        System.out.println("Minus" + r.nextInt() / 1000000);
    }

You are generating a new number! First you are generating one, and calling it x, and you test that for > 0, but then you generate a whole new random value and print it. You probably want this instead:

    int x = r.nextInt() / 1000000;
    if (x > 0) {
        System.out.println("Plus" + x);
    } else {
        System.out.println("Minus" + x);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
yes i got man..thanks –  user1089146 Jan 13 '12 at 7:03
int x = r.nextInt() / 1000000;
if (x > 0) {
    System.out.println("Plus" + r.nextInt() / 1000000);
} else {
    System.out.println("Minus" + r.nextInt() / 1000000);
}

You're regenerating the random number when you print out the value

share|improve this answer

Each time you call r.nextInt(), the next value is taken into account, meaning you skip a value with the test each time.

What you probably want is to use x inside the if-else blocks: System.out.println("Plus" + x);

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.