Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to calculate the difference of days between two dates. My code works fine when the year of the date does not change, but when I calculate the difference between two dates like so: (13/01/2012 to 13/12/2011), it gives a negative value. It also gives wrong values of difference when I calculate the difference between today's date and a future date. Please help me. Thank you in advance. Here is my code:

//getting values from text box
String fromtext = from.getText().toString();
String totext = to.getText().toString();
//sdf if a simple date formatter
SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yyyy");
Date fromdate = (Date) sdf.parse(fromtext);
Date todate = (Date) sdf.parse(totext);

Calendar fromcal = Calendar.getInstance();
Calendar tocal = Calendar.getInstance();


    fromcal.setTime(fromdate);
    tocal.setTime(todate);// setting to date


    int reportDays=(int)(todate.getTime()-fromdate.getTime())/(3600*24*1000);

please tell me what is the best way to calculate the difference in days.

share|improve this question
    
take a look at this example –  CloudyMarble Jan 13 '12 at 6:55

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In addition to the format issue already mentionned, you are likely to have an overflow. Try this:

int reportDays=(int)((todate.getTime()-fromdate.getTime())/(3600*24*1000));
share|improve this answer
    
exactly this is what i was doing wrong.It is working fine now.Thank you so much......:) –  picaso Jan 13 '12 at 7:37

Dates input : 13/01/2012, 13/12/2011

format seems dd/MM/yyyy and you are using wrong one (i.e. MM/dd/yyyy)

share|improve this answer
    
sorry it was typing mistake.but whenever i give correct format it returns negative values....... –  picaso Jan 13 '12 at 7:00
    
please add correct data with code –  Jigar Joshi Jan 13 '12 at 7:10

Using joda time would be the simplest way.

share|improve this answer

check this code:

import java.util.Calendar;

public class DateDifferent{  
  public static void main(String[] args){
  Calendar calendar1 = Calendar.getInstance();
  Calendar calendar2 = Calendar.getInstance();
  calendar1.set(2007, 01, 10);
  calendar2.set(2007, 07, 01);
  long milliseconds1 = calendar1.getTimeInMillis();
  long milliseconds2 = calendar2.getTimeInMillis();
  long diff = milliseconds2 - milliseconds1;
  long diffSeconds = diff / 1000;
  long diffMinutes = diff / (60 * 1000);
  long diffHours = diff / (60 * 60 * 1000);
  long diffDays = diff / (24 * 60 * 60 * 1000);
  System.out.println("\nThe Date Different Example");
  System.out.println("Time in milliseconds: " + diff + " milliseconds.");
  System.out.println("Time in seconds: " + diffSeconds + " seconds.");
  System.out.println("Time in minutes: " + diffMinutes + " minutes.");
  System.out.println("Time in hours: " + diffHours + " hours.");
  System.out.println("Time in days: " + diffDays + " days.");
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a simple little class I wrote for this purpose:

import java.text.DateFormat;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;

public class DifferenceInDays
{
    public int dateOffset(String incomingDate) throws ParseException
    {
        // parse dates
        DateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");
        Date date = (Date) formatter.parse(incomingDate);

        // convert to milliseconds
        long millisecs = date.getTime();

        // convert to days
        int offsetInDays = (int) Math.abs(millisecs / (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24));
        return offsetInDays;
    }
}

It takes care of negative offsets using the absolute value method.

share|improve this answer

If you try this with a locale that has daylight saving, and the from and to dates are before and after a daylight saving change the result may be different by 1 day. This is because Date and Calendar use timezones.

If you are only going to be dealing with dates between the years 1900 and 2100, there is a simple calculation which will give you the number of days since 1900:

public static int daysSince1900(Date date) {
    Calendar c = new GregorianCalendar();
    c.setTime(date);

    int year = c.get(Calendar.YEAR);
    if (year < 1900 || year > 2099) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("daysSince1900 - Date must be between 1900 and 2099");
    }
    year -= 1900;
    int month = c.get(Calendar.MONTH) + 1;
    int days = c.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);

    if (month < 3) {
        month += 12;
        year--;
    }
    int yearDays = (int) (year * 365.25);
    int monthDays = (int) ((month + 1) * 30.61);

    return (yearDays + monthDays + days - 63);
}

Thus, to get the difference in days between two dates, you calculate their days since 1900 and calc the difference. Our daysBetween method looks like this:

public static Integer getDaysBetween(Date date1, Date date2) {
    if (date1 == null || date2 == null) {
        return null;
    }

    int days1 = daysSince1900(date1);
    int days2 = daysSince1900(date2);

    if (days1 < days2) {
        return days2 - days1;
    } else {
        return days1 - days2;
    }
}

And don't ask me where this calculation came from because we've used it since the early '90s.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you dear......thanks a lot...:) –  picaso Mar 7 '12 at 8:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.