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I tried this Google query but it didn't show up (possibly because { was parsed as some special character or ignored).

I saw a query made on an example somewhere that looks like this:

SELECT `id` FROM areas WHERE `name` = '{$listing['cityname']}'

And this was in PHP (so inside mysql_query())

My best guess is it searches as a Lowercase (same as LOWER(name) AS...) but I want to be 100% sure how that's supposed to work.

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It has to do with "injection attacks". Parameters, please! (Also, include the full minimal-context of the code, as it will make the question and answer(s) more useful for people in the future :) –  user166390 Jan 13 '12 at 7:05
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1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

That's PHP syntax, not MySQL syntax. It allows you to interpolate complex expressions in a double-quoted string. So in your example, the array index $listing['cityname'] will be evaluated, and its value used in your query.

It has nothing to do with SQL whatsoever.

By the way, that's a gaping SQL injection vulnerability, assuming the array value hasn't yet been escaped with something like mysql_real_escape_string(). Most people use prepared statements for building SQL queries these days.

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What would be an example of such interpolation? Can you give a short example please. Thanks. –  Shamim Hafiz Jan 13 '12 at 7:02
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@Shamim Hafiz: There's already an example in the question. –  BoltClock Jan 13 '12 at 7:03
    
Yup but this is purely an internal process within my cron job so security is not an issue in this case. All other sections with user input has the mysql_real_escape_string() function. –  jeffkee Jan 13 '12 at 8:00
    
I read through the examples and I don't understand the difference between this and, say, $sql = "SELECT id FROM areas WHERE name = ' ".$listing['cityname']." ' "; –  jeffkee Jan 13 '12 at 8:04
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@jeffkee: There's no difference. At that point it's simply a matter of whichever looks nicer to you :) –  BoltClock Jan 13 '12 at 8:05
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