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I've been recently working towards learning a bit of assembly and I'm currently stumped on an exercise which requires me to find the maximum number of a list of long values.

The code is as follows:

.section .data
    data_items: .long 200, 201, 101, 10, 0
    min_val: .long 0x8000000000000000 # MIN_VALUE in long

.section .text
.global _start

    _start:
        movl $0, %edi   # init counter to 0
        movl min_val, %ebx
    start_loop:
        cmpl $0, %eax
        je loop_exit    # go to end if 0 encountered

        incl %edi
        movl data_items(,%edi,4), %eax
        cmpl %ebx, %eax
        jle start_loop  # if new value < max value in ebx, read next element

        movl %eax, %ebx
        jmp start_loop

    loop_exit:
        movl $1, %eax
        int $0x80

Two problems with this code:

  • When trying to assemble the code, I get the message: Warning: value 0x8000000000000000 truncated to 0x0
  • If I rewrite my code in an alternative logic (one which doesn't require min_value variable), any value greater than 255 in the list of data_items is truncated or returned as value % 256 even though the range of .long should be much larger?

Can anyone help me understand what I'm doing wrong?

EDIT: After changes, the code looks like below. Note how maximum in this case turns out to be 145 instead of 401.

.section .data
    data_items: .long 401, 201, 101, 10, 0
    max_val: .long 0x80000000

.section .text
.global _start

    _start:
        movl $0, %edi   # init counter to 0
        movl max_val, %ebx
    start_loop:
        movl data_items(,%edi,4), %eax
        cmpl $0, %eax
        je loop_exit    # go to end if 0 encountered

        incl %edi

        cmpl %ebx, %eax
        jle start_loop  # if new value < max value in ebx, read next element

        movl %eax, %ebx
        jmp start_loop

    loop_exit:
        movl $1, %eax
        int $0x80
share|improve this question
    
I see that your code puts the maximum in %ebx, but what does it do with it? How do you determine that the maximum comes out 145, if the program doesn't return it in any way? Perhaps the mechanism you use to get the result is to blame. –  ugoren Jan 13 '12 at 19:25
    
@ugoren: The contents of %ebx register is by default used as the return code for the executable. So, I can get the maximum value by doing ./max followed by echo $?. –  sasuke Jan 13 '12 at 19:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, 0x8000000000000000 doesn't even fit in a long, it's a long long. A long -1 is 0xffffffff.

As for the other point, I can't comment on code you haven't posted.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for replying. Two questions: isn't long datatype normally 64 bits like double? Also, I've added a new code snippet at the end to highlight the second comment. –  sasuke Jan 13 '12 at 19:16
    
No, long is dword, 32 bits. long long is qword, 64 bits. You are writing 32-bit code, and your instructions are all _l_ong. The code seems fine to me, exit status codes are 8-bit, so they are modulo 256. –  Jens Björnhager Jan 14 '12 at 5:29
    
Ah thanks, that clears things up. Accepted! –  sasuke Jan 14 '12 at 7:31

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