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Not sure if this exact question's been asked before, though a similar question has been asked here. Essentially, what I'm trying to is generate random integers of a minimum size that still sum up to a certain value (an invariant is that the sum / (number of randoms you want) is greater than the minimum value. Here's a sad attempt I coded up:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Random;

public class ScratchWork {

    private static Random rand = new Random();


    public static void main(String[] args) {
            int[] randoms = genRandoms(1000, 10, 30);
            for (int i = 0; i<randoms.length; i++) sop("Random Number "+ (i+1) + ": " + randoms[i]);
            sop("Sum: " + sum(randoms));
    }

    public static int sum(int[] array) { int sum = 0; for (int i : array) sum+=i; return sum; }

    public static int[] genRandoms(int n, int numberOfRandoms, int min) {
        if (min > n/numberOfRandoms) throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        int[] intRandArray = {0};
        while (sum(intRandArray) != n) {
            ////////////////////////
            // See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2640053/getting-n-random-numbers-that-the-sum-is-m
            Double[] randArray = new Double[numberOfRandoms];
            double workerSum = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i<numberOfRandoms; i++) {
                randArray[i] = ((double)rand.nextInt(n-1)+1);
                workerSum += randArray[i];
            }

            for (int i = 0; i<randArray.length; i++) {
                randArray[i] = n*(randArray[i]/(workerSum));
            }
            /////////////////////////

            while (existsSmallerNumThanMin(randArray, min)) 
                randArray = continueToFix(randArray, min);

            //Convert doubles to ints
            intRandArray = new int [randArray.length];
            for (int i = 0; i < intRandArray.length; i++) 
                intRandArray[i] = (int)Math.round(randArray[i]);
        }
        return intRandArray;
    }

    public static boolean existsSmallerNumThanMin(Double[] randArray, int min) {
        for (double i : randArray) if (i < (double)min) return true;
        return false;
    }

    public static Double[] continueToFix(Double[]randArray, int min) {
        Double[] tempArray = Arrays.copyOf(randArray, randArray.length);
        Arrays.sort(tempArray);
        int smallest = Arrays.asList(randArray).indexOf(tempArray[0]);
        int largest = Arrays.asList(randArray).indexOf(tempArray[tempArray.length-1]);

        double randomDelta = rand.nextInt(min);

        randArray[smallest]+=randomDelta;
        randArray[largest]-=randomDelta;
        return randArray;
    }

    public static void sop(Object s) { System.out.println(s); }

}

This is neither an elegant nor high-performing way to do this... It also doesn't seem to work well (if at all) when passed in, say, (100,10,10), which only allows for the number 10 in the array. The distribution of the random numbers is also pretty bad.

Is there an elegant approach to this??

Also, my end goal is to implement this in Objective-C, though I'm still just learning the ropes of that language, so any tips for doing this in that language would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
To get statistically sound answers, maybe also try stats.stackexchange.com –  Thilo Jan 13 '12 at 7:34
    
Should all possible combinations be equally likely? And how do you count them, i.e. is 5+5 one combination or two, and 2+4 the same combination as 4+2 or not? –  Thilo Jan 13 '12 at 7:56
    
All combinations being equally likely sounds a little nontrivial, but it doesn't matter how they're counted imho. –  benjammin Jan 13 '12 at 8:05
    
You mention two different restraints on the minimum value: a minimum value for each individual number, and a minimum value for the mean. Which of these do you want to restrain? The former is trivial, as it implies the latter. The latter is trivial if the sum is fixed. –  outis Jan 13 '12 at 8:24
    
The former (each number should be at least a minimum value, inclusive). –  benjammin Jan 13 '12 at 8:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on the revised requirements in the comments below.

public static int[] genRandoms(int total, int numberOfRandoms, int minimumValue) {
    int[] ret = new int[numberOfRandoms];
    Random rnd = new Random();
    int totalLeft = total;
    for (int i = 0; i < numberOfRandoms; i++) {
        final int rollsLeft = numberOfRandoms - i;
        int thisMax = totalLeft - (rollsLeft - 1) * minimumValue;
        int thisMin = Math.max(minimumValue, totalLeft / rollsLeft);
        int range = thisMax - thisMin;
        if (range < 0)
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Cannot have " + minimumValue + " * " + numberOfRandoms + " < " + total);
        int rndValue = range;
        for (int j = 0; j * j < rollsLeft; j++)
            rndValue = rnd.nextInt(rndValue + 1);
        totalLeft -= ret[i] = rndValue + thisMin;
    }
    Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(ret), rnd);
    return ret;
}

public static void main(String... args) throws IOException {
    for (int i = 100; i <= 1000; i += 150)
        System.out.println("genRandoms(" + i + ", 30, 10) = " + Arrays.toString(genRandoms(1000, 30, 10)));
}

prints

genRandoms(100, 30, 10) = [34, 13, 22, 20, 26, 12, 30, 45, 22, 35, 108, 20, 31, 53, 11, 35, 20, 11, 18, 32, 14, 30, 20, 19, 31, 31, 151, 45, 25, 36]
genRandoms(250, 30, 10) = [30, 27, 25, 34, 28, 33, 34, 82, 45, 30, 24, 26, 26, 45, 19, 18, 95, 28, 22, 30, 30, 25, 38, 11, 18, 27, 77, 26, 26, 21]
genRandoms(400, 30, 10) = [48, 25, 19, 22, 36, 65, 24, 29, 49, 24, 11, 30, 33, 41, 37, 33, 29, 36, 28, 24, 32, 12, 28, 29, 29, 34, 35, 28, 27, 103]
genRandoms(550, 30, 10) = [25, 44, 72, 36, 55, 41, 11, 33, 20, 21, 33, 19, 29, 30, 13, 39, 54, 26, 33, 30, 40, 32, 21, 31, 61, 13, 16, 51, 37, 34]
genRandoms(700, 30, 10) = [22, 13, 24, 26, 23, 61, 44, 79, 69, 25, 29, 83, 29, 35, 25, 13, 33, 32, 13, 12, 30, 26, 28, 26, 14, 21, 26, 13, 84, 42]
genRandoms(850, 30, 10) = [11, 119, 69, 14, 39, 62, 51, 52, 34, 16, 12, 17, 28, 25, 17, 31, 32, 30, 34, 12, 12, 38, 11, 32, 25, 16, 31, 82, 18, 30]
genRandoms(1000, 30, 10) = [25, 46, 59, 48, 36, 32, 29, 12, 27, 34, 33, 14, 12, 30, 29, 31, 25, 16, 34, 44, 25, 50, 60, 32, 42, 32, 13, 41, 51, 38]

IMHO, Shuffling the result improves the randomness of the distribution.

share|improve this answer
    
I get strange output on input (12,3,100) (3 random numbers >= 12 that sum up to 100). –  benjammin Jan 13 '12 at 9:17
    
I thought n was the maximum, not the minimum value. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 13 '12 at 9:19
1  
Solid, plus I can also easily implement this in objective-c. Thanks! –  benjammin Jan 13 '12 at 10:53
1  
@Thilo similar. The last value has to be total - totalSoFar so the min need to increase at certain points. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 13 '12 at 12:06
1  
Umm... you have a 108 in genRandoms(100, 30, 10). That's not good. –  Thomas Eding Jan 13 '12 at 18:43

Maybe a recursive approach:

  • if numberOfRandoms is 1, return n
  • if numberOfRandoms is x+1
    • get a random integer (myNumber) between min and n-min*x (so that at least min is left for each of the remaining x numbers)
    • get the remaining x that add up to n-myNumber
share|improve this answer
    
Sounds good like a pretty nifty solution to me! I'll try implementing it. –  benjammin Jan 13 '12 at 7:44
    
I bet this will generate a biased outcome. –  Thomas Eding Jan 13 '12 at 7:46
    
Yeah, I am not sure. For a proper analysis we really need to ask the folks at stats.stackexchange.com –  Thilo Jan 13 '12 at 7:48

I did some more testing, and my Java implementation is broken. I think my algorithm is bad.

How about something like getting N random numbers in [0,1] and normalize the results based on their sums (different than the desired sum). Then multiply these values against the desired number sum.

This assumes the minimum size is 0. Generalizing this to maintain a minimum for each result is simple. Just feed in sum - min * n for sum. Add min to all the results.

To avoid potential floating point issues, you can do something similar with using a range of integer values that are logically on the scale [0,M] (M arbitarily large) instead of [0,1]. The idea is the same in that you "normalize" your random results. So lets say you get a random sum of N (want N to have to be a multiple of sum+1... see REMARK). Divy N up by sum+1 parts. The first part is 0, second is 1, ..., last is sum. Each random value looks up its value by seeing what part of N it belongs to.

REMARK: If you are okay with an arbitrarily small amount of bias, make each die roll a magnitude larger than sum (might want BigInteger for this). Let N be the sum. Then N = k*sum + rem where rem < sum. If N is large, then rem / k -> 0, which is good. N is probabilistically large if M is large.

Algorithm psuedo code:

F(S, N):
    let R[] = list of 0's of size N
    if S = 0: return R[]
    for 0 <= i < N
        R[i] = random integer in [0, M] -- inclusive and (M >= S). M should be an order larger than S. A good pick might be M = 1000*S*N. Not sure though. M should probably be based on both S and N though or simply an outragously large number.
    let Z = sum R[]
    for 0 <= i < N
        R[i] = (Z mod R[i]) mod (S+1)
    return R[]

Java implementation:

import java.math.BigInteger;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.TreeMap;


public class Rand {
    private final Random rand;

    public Rand () {
        this(new Random());
    }

    public Rand (Random rand) {
        this.rand = rand;
    }

    public int[] randNums (int total, int minVal, int numRands) {
        if (minVal * numRands > total) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        }
        int[] results = randNums(total - minVal * numRands, numRands);
        for (int i = 0; i < numRands; ++i) {
            results[i] += minVal;
        }
        return results;
    }

    private int[] randNums (int total, int n) {
        final int[] results = new int[n];
        if (total == 0) {
            Arrays.fill(results, 0);
            return results;
        }
        final BigInteger[] rs = new BigInteger[n];
        final BigInteger totalPlus1 = BigInteger.valueOf(total + 1L);
        while (true) {
            for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
                rs[i] = new BigInteger(256, rand);
            }
            BigInteger sum = BigInteger.ZERO;
            for (BigInteger r : rs) {
                sum = sum.add(r);
            }
            if (sum.compareTo(BigInteger.ZERO) == 0) {
                continue;
            }
            for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
                results[i] = sum.mod(rs[i]).mod(totalPlus1).intValue();
            }
            return results;
        }
    }

    public static void main (String[] args) {
        Rand rand = new Rand();
        Map<Integer, Integer> distribution = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();
        final int total = 107;
        final int minVal = 3;
        final int n = 23;
        for (int i = total - (n-1) * minVal; i >= minVal; --i) {
            distribution.put(i, 0);
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i) {
            int[] rs = rand.randNums(total, minVal, n);
            for (int r : rs) {
                int count = distribution.get(r);
                distribution.put(r, count + 1);
            }
        }
        System.out.print(distribution);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if it is safe to leave the real of integers. Also, what do you do with numbers that are below the minimum? Start all over seems to be safest. –  Thilo Jan 13 '12 at 7:51
    
@Thilo: Updated. –  Thomas Eding Jan 13 '12 at 8:02
    
Alright, I'll implement your algo and try it out (I don't really have a natural intuition for this sort of thing:P ) –  benjammin Jan 13 '12 at 8:36
    
Hmmm... Had some issues with the implementation –  benjammin Jan 13 '12 at 10:54
    
@BenM: Whoops, forgot to do another need mod in my psuedo code. R[i] = Z mod R[i] -> R[i] = (Z mod R[i]) mod (S+1) –  Thomas Eding Jan 13 '12 at 18:41

Does this do what you need?

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Random;

public class ScratchWork {
    static Random rng = new Random();

    public static int randomRange(int n) {
        // Random integer between 0 and n-1
        assert n > 0;
        int r = rng.nextInt();
        if(r >= 0 && r < Integer.MAX_VALUE / n * n) {
            return r % n;
        }
        return randomRange(n);
    }

    public static int[] genRandoms(int n, int numberOfRandoms, int min) {
        int randomArray[] = new int[numberOfRandoms];
        for(int i = 0; i < numberOfRandoms; i++) {
            randomArray[i] = min;
        }
        for(int i = min*numberOfRandoms; i < n; i++) {
            randomArray[randomRange(numberOfRandoms)] += 1;
        }
        return randomArray;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int randoms[] = genRandoms(1000, 10, 30);
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(randoms));

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. That looks good. In words: Start all numbers at the minimum, and sprinkle +1 randomly over them. –  Thilo Jan 13 '12 at 7:52
1  
OTOH: Isn't this terribly biased towards an equal distribution? If you want 3 numbers to add up to 100, minimum 1, something like 80:10:10 should appear once in a while. –  Thilo Jan 13 '12 at 7:54
    
You're right @Thilo. Suppose we have two positive numbers, (x, y) which add to 10. There should be a one in eleven chance that (0, 10) is chosen. But for this algorithm, it's one in 2^10. –  wye.bee Jan 13 '12 at 7:58

This is a utility method for generating a fixed length random number.

    public final static String createRandomNumber(long len) {
    if (len > 18)
        throw new IllegalStateException("To many digits");
    long tLen = (long) Math.pow(10, len - 1) * 9;

    long number = (long) (Math.random() * tLen) + (long) Math.pow(10, len - 1) * 1;

    String tVal = number + "";
    if (tVal.length() != len) {
        throw new IllegalStateException("The random number '" + tVal + "' is not '" + len + "' digits");
    }
    return tVal;
}
share|improve this answer

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