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I have a case where i have got 10+ SQL script.

I don't want to go and run all my scripts 1 by 1.

Is there a way that i can run all my scripts in succession in SQL Management studio.

I found this post. Creating a batch file seems easier.

This is all you need:

@echo off
ECHO %USERNAME% started the batch process at %TIME%  >output.txt


for %%f in (*.sql) do (
 (
sqlcmd.exe  -S servername -E   -d databasename -i %%f >>output.txt
)


pause

Replacing servername and databasename, but it seems to be not working.

Any ideas?

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What appears in output.txt when you run the batch file? –  Mark Bannister Jan 13 '12 at 9:00
    
@MarkBannister Willem started the batch process at 10:50:30.46. Then nothing else happens –  Willem Jan 13 '12 at 9:13
    
What output do you get if you remove the @echo off command from the batch file and try again? Also, try adding ECHO %PATH% to the start of the batch file and check that the path for SQLCMD.EXE is included. –  Mark Bannister Jan 13 '12 at 9:18
    
@MarkBannister Willem started the batch process at 11:18:51.16. –  Willem Jan 13 '12 at 9:19
    
How about the path - did it include the path for SQLCMD.EXE? Additionally, what happens if you try running the batch command interactively, in a command prompt? –  Mark Bannister Jan 13 '12 at 9:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can create a Strored Procedure to call all your Scripts. You could also create a schedule plan to run the scripts automaticaly.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa174792(v=sql.80).aspx

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Please have a look at my updated question. –  Willem Jan 13 '12 at 8:44
    
Do you got an error message from the script? Have you checked the path for '*.sql', which represents the sql scripts you want to run. –  Andreas Rohde Jan 13 '12 at 9:06
    
No error message. Paths are all fine –  Willem Jan 13 '12 at 9:14
    
Only a thought: Try to delete the blanks between the option and the parameter –  Andreas Rohde Jan 13 '12 at 9:24
    
Still nothing. It just seems to skip all the files... Is the syntax even right? –  Willem Jan 13 '12 at 9:32

Yes, it's possible. You can do it with :r command of SQLCMD.

I strongly recommend you to read this article and do it with SQLCMD

http://www.mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/1543/using-sqlcmd-to-execute-multiple-sql-server-scripts/

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Please have a look at my updated question. –  Willem Jan 13 '12 at 8:44
1  
Is this possible to run all script in transaction? and if any error in any script then rollback and stop execution. –  Rikin Patel Jun 20 '12 at 7:13

You've got an unmatched parenthesis, there. Try

for %%f in (*.sql) do sqlcmd.exe -S servername -E -d databasename -i %%f >>output.txt

I just saved it in a .cmd file and it appears to be working.

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Here is an open source utility with source code http://scriptzrunner.codeplex.com/

This utility was written in c# and allows you to drag and drop many sql files and start running them against a database.

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You probably already know this, in case you don't, the script you posted will only run on machines that have SQL server installed.

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