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I use SWIG and Numpy. I define a C function called inplace() to process data array fast, and I want to make some error checking (if two arrays have the same dimentions).

I use %rename and %inline in the .i file. As I understand, rename should map the function names', so every time someone uses inplace, safe_inplace is run and the errors are checked.

But it does not work :( . As far I notice, safe_inplace is not executed, python runs directly inplace without touching the safe version of the function.

# .i

%include "inplace.h"
%rename (inplace) safe_inplace;

%inline %{
    void safe_inplace(int* datain, int in_dx, int in_dy, int in_dz,
                      int* dataout, int out_dx, int out_dy)
    {
        if ((in_dx != out_dx) || (in_dy != out_dy)) { 
            PyErr_Format(PyExc_ValueError, /*... messgage*/) 
            return;
        } 

        inplace( /* .. pass the arguments to original function*/ );
    }

header file:

# .h 

void inplace(int* datain, int in_dx, int in_dy, int in_dz, int* dataout, int out_dx, int out_dy);

Python:

#.py
inplace.inplace(a,b)

The original example that I modify can be found here

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your original approach was close, but you probably want to get SWIG not to wrap the original version of the function at all.

I've put together a slightly simpler example illustrating how this could work. Given the header file:

void foo();

We want to wrap it such that a slightly modified version is called before invoking the real one.

The simplest way to do this would be to never actually show SWIG the header file at all for wrapping, only for compiling the wrapper, e.g.:

%module test

%{
#include "test.h"
#include <iostream>
%}

%rename (foo) foo_safe;
%inline %{
  void foo_safe() {
    std::cout << "Hello world" << std::endl;
    foo(); // Calls the foo() from test.h, as you'd hope
  }
%}

If you don't want to drop the %include (e.g. there's other things you care about in that header file too) you can do something like:

%module test

%{
#include "test.h"
#include <iostream>
%}

%rename (unsafe_foo) foo;    
%include "test.h"

%rename (foo) foo_safe;    
%inline %{
  void foo_safe() {
    std::cout << "Hello world" << std::endl;
    foo();
  }
%}

To expose the real implementation of foo as unsafe_foo.

Or you could use %ignore if there's no reason for Python users to be able to call unsafe_ignore ever:

%module test

%{
#include "test.h"
#include <iostream>
%}

%rename (foo) foo_safe;    
%inline %{
  void foo_safe() {
    std::cout << "Hello world" << std::endl;
    foo();
  }
%}

%ignore foo;    
%include "test.h"

Finally it looks like your goal is actually just to run some code prior to the call of the real C function. If that's the case there's a few ways you can do that too, for example you can add python code before the real function call is made with pythonprepend:

%feature("pythonprepend") foo() %{
   print "hello world"
   # check args and raise possibly 
%}

Or lastly you could use the %exception functionality too, something like (untested):

%exception inplace {
   // Check args and possibly throw
   $action
}

$action will be substituted with the real call automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks! Question here: why you include twice test.h in the example with unsafe_foo? Doesn;t it meant that foo will be available both as foo and unsafe_foo (overhead)? –  Jakub M. Jan 13 '12 at 10:17
    
@JakubM. nope, it's not going to be there twice, one's a #include, inside a %{ %} pair and the other is a %include. The latter tells SWIG to bring the contents of the file into the .i file (exactly like #include in C or C++). The former tells SWIG that the generated wrapper filer (test_wrap.cxx in this example) needs to include that exact code verbatim, that is to say that test_wrap.cxx will contain that exact #include, but otherwise the contents of the %{ %} has no impact on SWIG itself. –  Flexo Jan 13 '12 at 10:27

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