Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using

fid = fopen('fgfg.txt');

to open a file.

Sometimes an error occurs before I manage to close the file. I can't do anything with that file until I close Matlab.

How can I close a file if an error occurs?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 37 down vote accepted

First of all, you can use the command

fclose all

Secondly, you can use try-catch blocks and close your file handles

 try
     f = fopen('myfile.txt','r')
     % do something
     fclose(f);
 catch me
     fclose(f);
     rethrow(me);
 end

There is a third approach, which is much better. Matlab is now an object-oriented language with garbage collector. You can define a wrapper object that will take care of its lifecycle automatically.

Since it is possible in Matlab to call object methods both in this way:

myObj.method()

and in that way:

method(myObj)

You can define a class that mimics all of the relevant file command, and encapsulates the lifecycle.

classdef safefopen < handle
    properties(Access=private)
        fid;
    end

    methods(Access=public)
        function this = safefopen(fileName,varargin)            
            this.fid = fopen(fileName,varargin{:});
        end

        function fwrite(this,varargin)
            fwrite(this.fid,varargin{:});
        end

        function fprintf(this,varargin)
            fprintf(this.fid,varargin{:});
        end

        function delete(this)
            fclose(this.fid);
        end
    end

end

The delete operator is called automatically by Matlab. (There are more functions that you will need to wrap, (fread, fseek, etc..)).

So now you have safe handles that automatically close the file whether you lost scope of it or an error happened.

Use it like this:

f = safefopen('myFile.txt','wt')
fprintf(f,'Hello world!');

And no need to close.

Edit: I just thought about wrapping fclose() to do nothing. It might be useful for backward compatibility - for old functions that use file ids.

Edit(2): Following @AndrewJanke good comment, I would like to improve the delete method by throwing errors on fclose()

    function delete(this)          
        [msg,errorId] = fclose(this.fid);
        if errorId~=0
            throw(MException('safefopen:ErrorInIO',msg));
        end
    end
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 Great use of delete. One catch: this is buffered I/O, so failed writes may only show up in the fclose() call; as is, they'll be silently ignored here. Could test fclose()'s return value and call error() on failure. And in delete the error will turn in to a warning. May want to include an optional fclose() method so the caller can expose the error as an exception or handle it, and have delete() just close if it's still open. Might also want to test fopen() for failure in constructor; as is, it'll stash an invalid fid, and then error in fwrite() or delete() when acting on it. –  Andrew Janke Jan 13 '12 at 15:44
2  
I think this was my idea ;) In any case, I would ensure that the delete method is exception-free. The only thing that can cause fclose to fail is if this.fid is an invalid file handle; in which case, you don't need to close the file. –  Nzbuu Feb 26 '12 at 16:35
1  
@Nzbuu, I won't be arguing with you on the originality :) I like it so I put (+1) at your post. By the way, fclose can fail due to the fact that some errors that occur during read/write. Check out AndrewJankes comment. –  Andrey Feb 26 '12 at 16:40
    
MATLAB's file handling isn't usually buffered: blogs.mathworks.com/loren/2006/04/19/high-performance-file-io. In any case, what do you want to happen when the exception is thrown? The file handle will be gone because the object must be deleted when it goes out of scope. –  Nzbuu Feb 26 '12 at 16:48
1  
@Nzbuu, thanks, good to know about the W and w mode. –  Andrey Feb 26 '12 at 17:03

You can try a very neat "function" added by ML called onCleanup. Loren Shure had a complete writeup on it when it was added. It's a class that you instantiate with your cleanup code, then it executes when it goes out of scope - i.e. when it errors, or the function ends. Makes the code very clean. This is a generic version of the class that Andrey had above. (BTW, for complex tasks like hitting external data sources, custom classes are definitely the way to go.)

from the help:

function fileOpenSafely(fileName)
   fid = fopen(fileName, 'w');
   c = onCleanup(@()fclose(fid));

   functionThatMayError(fid);
end   % c executes fclose(fid) here

Basically, you give it a function handle (in this case @()fclose(fid))that it runs when it goes out of scope.

Your cleanup code is executed either when an error is thrown OR when it exits normally, because you exit fileOpenSafely and c goes out of scope.

No try/catch or conditional code necessary.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 because I did not know about onCleanup –  Andrey Jan 13 '12 at 15:47
3  
+1 onCleanup is great. But actually, file I/O is one of those complex tasks that's hitting an external data source. Matlab's file handle I/O mostly uses status codes instead of throwing errors, so every call to fopen(), fread(), fclose(), and so on needs an accompanying check of the return value or ferror() to be fully correct. And it's annoying, so nobody bothers to actually do it in their code. It's perfect for a custom class that wraps them and adds status checks that turn in to error() calls on failure. –  Andrew Janke Jan 13 '12 at 15:57
1  
Andrew - for file io that you do routinely, I'll agree, but for a quick and dirty script, this is a way to step up your game easily. –  Marc Jan 15 '12 at 20:35

Andrey's solution above is indeed the best approach to this problem. I just wanted to add that throwing an exception in method delete() might be problematic, if you deal with arrays of safefopen objects. During destruction of such an array, MATLAB will call delete() on each array element and, if any delete() throws, then you might end up with leftover open file handles. If you really need to know whether something went wrong during destruction then issuing a warning would be a better option IMHO.

For those that feel lazy to write all the forwarding methods to every MATLAB builtin that uses file handles, you may consider the simple alternative of overloading method subsref for class safefopen:

methods(Access=public)
    function varargout = subsref(this, s)            
        switch s(1).type                
            case '.'                    
                if numel(s) > 1,
                    feval(s(1).subs, this.fid, s(2).subs{:});
                else
                    feval(s(1).subs, this.fid);
                end
                % We ignore outputs, but see below for an ugly solution to this
                varargout = {};
            otherwise                    
                varargout{1} = builtin('subsref', this, s);                    
        end      

    end
end

This alternative uses the somewhat ugly feval, but has the advantage of working even if the MATLAB guys (or yourself) decide to add new functions that involve file handles, or if the number/order of the input arguments to a given function change. If you decide to go for the subsref alternative then you should use class safefopen like this:

myFile = safefopen('myfile.txt', 'w');
myFile.fprintf('Hello World!');

EDIT: A disadvantage of the subsref solution is that it disregards all output arguments. If you need the output arguments then you will have to introduce some more ugliness:

methods(Access=public)
function varargout = subsref(this, s)                   
        if nargout > 0,
            lhs = 'varargout{%d} ';
            lhs = repmat(lhs, 1, nargout);
            lhs = ['[' sprintf(lhs, 1:nargout) ']='];   
        else
            lhs = '';
        end            
        switch s(1).type                
            case '.'                    
                if numel(s) > 1,                        
                    eval(...
                        sprintf(...
                        '%sfeval(''%s'', this.fid,  s(2).subs{:});', ...
                        lhs, s(1).subs) ...
                        );                        
                else                        
                    eval(...
                        sprintf('%sfeval(''%s'', this.fid);', ...
                        lhs, s(1).subs) ...
                        );                        
                end                 

            otherwise                    
                varargout{1} = builtin('subsref', this, s);

        end            
end
end

And then you could do things like:

myFile = safefopen('myfile.txt', 'w');
count = myFile.fprintf('Hello World!'); 
[filename,permission,machineformat,encoding] = myFile.fopen();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - Cool! I liked the feval approach. Also I agree with your comment about arrays of files. –  Andrey Sep 24 '12 at 22:59
fids=fopen('all');
fclose(fids);

%assuming that you want to close all open filehandles

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.