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following piece of code:

 class a{

        public function __get($key) {
            if($key == 'obj') {
                if($b->obj == null) { //PSEUDO this is what I intend to do :)
                   $obj = new Obj();                        
                   $b->obj = $obj
                }
                return $obj;
            }
        }
    }

 class b extends a{

        private $obj = null;


        public function __get($key) {
            return parent::__get($key);
        }

    }

So the idea is to create objects on demand. But I don't know if it's possible to detect the class of the object that is calling the parent::_get method. Some operator like child is what I am looking for I guess :).

What is possible but redundant is that for example I have one object called Country, so I define in my class User which has a Country object and another class Location with also has a Country object. Both classes extend class a. I could solve the problem by writing the if block from class a into each of the child classes. But that is what I do not want to do. So it would be easier to be able to check in class a which class called the __get function and to set the desired Country object directly into the child class. I hope my problem becomes clear and it's not too weird hehe. Though I am open for any other solutions... Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

http://codepad.org/Qnc938Wv

class a{

    public function __get($key) {
        if($key == 'obj') {
            if($this->_obj == null) { //PSEUDO this is what I intend to do :)
               echo "creating ";
               $obj = new StdClass();                        
               $obj->what = get_class($this);
               $this->_obj = $obj;
            }
            return $this->_obj;
        }
    }
}

class location extends a{
    protected $_obj = null;
    public function __get($key) {
        return parent::__get($key);
    }
}

class user extends a{
    protected $_obj = null;
    public function __get($key) {
        return parent::__get($key);
    }
}

$l = new location();
echo $l->obj->what . "\n";

$u = new user();
echo $u->obj->what . "\n";

echo $l->obj->what . "\n";
echo $u->obj->what . "\n";

This results in

creating location
creating user
location
user
share|improve this answer
    
yes, this is somehow my solution, problem here is that $this->_obj == null is always true because class a does not have a member called _obj. this is basically the point where it would have to ask the child class do you have this object already. this way it keeps creating the object everytime I want to access a member. –  samy Jan 13 '12 at 11:32
    
Well - no. See the output - object is created once, the second time it is only fetched. –  bububaba Jan 13 '12 at 11:37
    
alright, thanks, problem was that my members where private so the mother class couldn update them :) thanks! –  samy Jan 13 '12 at 17:48
    
Oh, right. Forgot to mention that :) –  bububaba Jan 13 '12 at 19:17

If you want to know inside the __get() method (shared between many classes via extends) what is the class of the object it was called on use get_called_class.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, but that would only hand me the class, I need sth like get_calling_object, the class alone does not help. and I am not talking of static methods :& –  samy Jan 13 '12 at 10:21
    
Is that any different from using $this in the parent class? See my updated answer. –  bububaba Jan 13 '12 at 10:36

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