Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my case I have five huge text files,which I have to embedd into one text file.

I tried with StreamReader(),but I don't know how to make it Read one more file,do I have to assign another variable?

Showing an example will be appreciated greatfully.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

New answer

(See explanation for junking original answer below.)

static void CopyFiles(string dest, params string[] sources)
{
    using (TextWriter writer = File.CreateText(dest))
    {
        // Somewhat arbitrary limit, but it won't go on the large object heap
        char[] buffer = new char[16 * 1024]; 
        foreach (string source in sources)
        {
            using (TextReader reader = File.OpenText(source))
            {
                int charsRead;
                while ((charsRead = reader.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
                {
                    writer.Write(buffer, 0, charsRead);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

This new answer is quite like Martin's approach, except:

  • It reads into a smaller buffer; 16K is going to be acceptable in almost all situations, and won't end up on the large object heap (which doesn't get compacted)
  • It reads text data instead of binary data, for two reasons:
    • The code can easily be modified to convert from one encoding to another
    • If each input file contains a byte-order mark, that will be skipped by the reader, instead of ending up with byte-order marks scattered through the output file at input file boundaries

Original answer

Martin Stettner pointed out an issue in the answer below - if the first file ends without a newline, it will still create a newline in the output file. Also, it will translate newlines into the "\r\n" even if they were previously just "\r" or "\n". Finally, it pointlessly risks using large amounts of data for long lines.

Something like:

static void CopyFiles(string dest, params string[] sources)
{
    using (TextWriter writer = File.CreateText(dest))
    {
        foreach (string source in sources)
        {
            using (TextReader reader = File.OpenText(source))
            {
                string line;
                while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
                {
                    writer.WriteLine(line);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Note that this reads line by line to avoid reading too much into memory at a time. You could make it simpler if you're happy to read each file completely into memory (still one at a time):

static void CopyFiles(string dest, params string[] sources)
{
    using (TextWriter writer = File.CreateText(dest))
    {
        foreach (string source in sources)
        {
            string text = File.ReadAllText(source);
            writer.Write(text);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Skeet beats me again! –  jrcs3 May 19 '09 at 20:44
    
He just took a look at his keyboard and it began typing the answer with the speed of light. :) –  Ivan Prodanov May 19 '09 at 20:45
    
Skeet must be an android. He can't possibly be human. +1 –  ichiban May 19 '09 at 21:56
    
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but the first version will insert additional EOL characters if one file hasn't one at its end. So the two programs will not have the same behaviour imo. Also, you could theoretically run into troubles if you have really long lings (such that ReadLine isn't able to read them in the internal buffer). I think a version using an preallocated buffer and Stream.Read/Stream.Write might be more robust. –  MartinStettner May 19 '09 at 22:03
    
Ooh yes, you're right about the first one. I don't agree about using a stream directly though. Will post an updated version. –  Jon Skeet May 19 '09 at 22:27

Edit:

As Jon Skeet pointed out, text files usually should be handled differently than binary files .

I just leave this answer since it might be more performant if you have really big files and aren't concernded by encoding issues (such as different input files having different encodings or multiple Byte Order Marks in the output file):

public void CopyFiles(string destPath, string[] sourcePaths) {
  byte[] buffer = new byte[10 * 1024 * 1024]; // Just allocate a buffer as big as you can afford
  using (var destStream= = new FileStream(destPath, FileMode.Create) {
    foreach (var sourcePath in sourcePaths) {
      int read;
      using (var sourceStream = FileStream.Create(sourcePath, FileMode.Open) {
        while ((read = sourceStream.Read(buffer, 0, 10*1024*1024)) != 0)
          destStream.Write(buffer, 0, read);
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It does make a difference - consider what happens if all the text files start with a byte order mark. You would want your output to only have a single one. –  Jon Skeet May 19 '09 at 22:26
    
Thank you for pointing this out. Interestingly, MSDN doesn't mention that File.OpenText() (or even StreamReader) consumes the byte order marks. BOMs are not even mentioned in all StreamReader-constructors documentation. Moreover MSDN states that File.OpenText works with UTF-8 files while it really uses the same detection mechanism as StreamReader (thus perfectly working with any other supported encoding). –  MartinStettner May 19 '09 at 23:14
    
I'd take issue with "any other supported encoding" - it's "any auto-detected encoding" which is a very different thing IMO :) –  Jon Skeet May 20 '09 at 5:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.