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EDIT: I am rephrasing entirely my original question as it was far from clear (it's non-clearness can be seen at the bottom!).

I am developing a RTOS where both the kernel and the applications must be mapped to very specific locations in memory. For example:

0x00000000:0x0000ffff: application #1
0x00010000:0x0000ffff: application #2
...
0xffff0000:0xffffffff: kernel

The applications (and the kernel) are developed (and compiled) separately. To merged everything into a single executable, the following process is used:

  1. (Separately) Compile the kernel and the applications (stripped of any symbols).
  2. (Through a script) Generate a linker script to relocate the kernel and the applications to the desired locations. To prevent any conflicts between sections' names, the generated linker script "renames" all sections of all applications (e.g. .app1.text, .app1.data, .app1.bss, ...).
  3. Link using the previously generated linker script (i.e. merge all).

Question 1) Is it possible to replace steps #2 and #3 with something like the following process?

  1. Relocate the object files of the kernel and the applications to the desired position.
  2. Rename all symbols on the applications' object files (to prevent name clashes).
  3. Merge all.

I'm trying to replace the generation of the linker script with some already available tools.

Step #1 should be possible through the creation of a position independent executable (I still have to investigate this).

Step #2 is possible through GNU objcopy.

For Step #3 I have no possible solution yet. If GNU ld is used, it uses some default linker script and the previous relocation is lost. If GNU gdb accepted archives generated from GNU ar the problem would be solved (I guess!).

Question 2) If the above process is possible, can it be applied to debugging information as well?

Step #1 should remain intact.

For step #2 I am not sure if debugging information gets renamed or not.

The problem with step #3 remains.

The original question follows:

I have a custom kernel and one or more applications and, I want to use GDB to debug the entire system. In order to avoid any name clashes during linkage I use objcopy to rename all the sections and symbols names (applications' start addresses are hard-coded in the kernel). However, debugging information is [I guess] hard-coded inside those .debug.* sections and do not get renamed.

Is there a way to rename the debugging information? And, after that, merge that information with another set of already existent debugging information?

I have searched GCC's manual to see if I can find an option to prefix (like a global namespace) all symbols during compilation, but I haven't found any.

My guess is that there is a debugging format which exposes its information on the objects symbol table (which can be renamed).

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Your question is exceedingly unclear. What do you mean "applications' start addresses are hard-coded". Are these part of your kernel, or user-level programs. Also, what sections are you renaming to what? Renaming e.g. .debug_lines to something else is unlikely to produce anything GDB could handle. –  Employed Russian Jan 14 '12 at 11:55
    
With "applications' start addresses are hard-coded" I mean that the kernel does not rely on any naming convention to start its "user-level" application. Therefore, any entry in the symbol table can be renamed freely. –  Adriano Carvalho Jan 17 '12 at 2:43
    
Sorry, you are still not making any sense (to me). Perhaps someone else will have better luck. In the mean time, delete the comment above and move that information into your question. –  Employed Russian Jan 17 '12 at 8:27
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1 Answer

Answer to Question 1)

Step #1 should be possible through the creation of a position independent executable (I still have to investigate this).

No, it is not possible. A position independent executable is useful when the load address of the executable is known only at load time. In my case, I want to hardwire the load address.

For Step #3 I have no possible solution yet. If GNU ld is used, it uses some default linker script and the previous relocation is lost. If GNU gdb accepted archives generated from GNU ar the problem would be solved (I guess!).

There seems to be no workaround. A linker script is thus mandatory.

Answer to Question 2)

For step #2 I am not sure if debugging information gets renamed or not.

In fact, debugging information does not get renamed. You can use objdump -s and check that debugging information is hardwired inside those .debug.* sections.

Workaround)

Even without debugging information you can use the object file's symbol table to set breakpoints. However, instead b main your must use b * main because the symbols in the symtable are interpreted as address. This is not much, but it certainly helps.

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