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I have an interface with a property like this:

public interface IFoo {
    // ...

    [JsonIgnore]
    string SecretProperty { get; }

    // ...
}

I want the SecretProperty to be ignored when serializing all implementing classes. But it seems I have to define the JsonIgnore attribute on every implementation of the property. Is there a way to achieve this without having to add the JsonIgnore attribute to every implementation? I didn't find any serializer setting which helped me.

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You should add this as an answer and accept it, if it solves your problem. –  Groo Jan 13 '12 at 14:04
    
I did so now, but I couldn't do it much earlier because I was not allowed to do it less than 8 hours after my question (and because I was not at work at the weekend). –  fero Jan 16 '12 at 7:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

After a bit of searching, I found this question:

How to inherit the attribute from interface to object when serializing it using JSON.NET

I took the code by Jeff Sternal and added JsonIgnoreAttribute detection, so it looks like this:

class InterfaceContractResolver : DefaultContractResolver
{
    public InterfaceContractResolver() : this(false) { }

    public InterfaceContractResolver(bool shareCache) : base(shareCache) { }

    protected override JsonProperty CreateProperty(MemberInfo member, MemberSerialization memberSerialization)
    {
        var property = base.CreateProperty(member, memberSerialization);
        var interfaces = member.DeclaringType.GetInterfaces();
        foreach (var @interface in interfaces)
        {
            foreach (var interfaceProperty in @interface.GetProperties())
            {
                // This is weak: among other things, an implementation 
                // may be deliberately hiding an interface member
                if (interfaceProperty.Name == member.Name && interfaceProperty.MemberType == member.MemberType)
                {
                    if (interfaceProperty.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(JsonIgnoreAttribute), true).Any())
                    {
                        property.Ignored = true;
                        return property;
                    }

                    if (interfaceProperty.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(JsonPropertyAttribute), true).Any())
                    {
                        property.Ignored = false;
                        return property;
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        return property;
    }
}

Using this InterfaceContractResolver in my JsonSerializerSettings, all properties which have a JsonIgnoreAttribute in any interface are ignored, too, even if they have a JsonPropertyAttribute (due to the order of the inner if blocks).

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I have found it's simplest to create a DTO of only the properties I want and serialize that object to JSON. it creates many small, context specific objects but managing the code base is much easier and I don't have to think about what I'm serializing vs what I'm ignoring.

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You should add [DataContract] in front of the class name.

It changes the default from including all properties, to including only explicitly marked properties. After that, add '[DataMember]' in front of each property you want to include in the JSON output.

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That's absolutely not what I want. I wanted an ignore definition in the interface to be passed up to the top of the class hierarchy so the serializer will ignore my interface property. I do not want the property to be serializable in any implementation of the interface. –  fero Nov 18 '13 at 7:38

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