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Let's suppose that we have 3 classes: Base, Root and Child.

public abstract class Base
{
    protected int _Value;

    public double DoSomeWork(int value)
    {
        _Value = value;
        double result = Calculate();

        return result;
    }

    public abstract double Calculate();

    public Child CreateChild(int length)
    {
        return new Child(this);
    }
}

public class Root : Base
{
    public override double Calculate()
    {
        return _Value;
    }
}

public class Child : Base
{
    readonly Base _Container;

    public Child(Base container)
    {
        _Container = container;
    }

    public override double Calculate()
    {
        double result = _Container.Calculate();
        // do some more calculation

        return result;
    }
}

My issue here is that I would like only the DoSomeWork (and CreateChild) be publicly accessible, but in my "architecture" I am forced to make Calculate public also. Or am I?

Any input will be very much appreciated.

Edit:

Calculate cannot be protected because of this line in Child

double result = _Container.Calculate();

which would cause a build error to occur.

share|improve this question
    
It is not completely clear what you are trying to accomplish, since your code appears incomplete. For example, _Value field is not used anywhere, as well as the value parameter in the DoSomeWork method. It would be helpful to show how they are supposed to interact. Right now DoSomeWork appears redundant, and Calculate seems to be doing all the work (and therefore needs to be public). On the other hand, it may turn out that Calculate doesn't belong to this class at all, which is what I suspect from this first glance. –  Groo Jan 13 '12 at 12:19
    
@Groo _Value is used in Root class. I have edited the question to "use" value parameter. I agree that it's the "architecture" that is most probably at fault. General idea is that the consumer should instantiate Root class and then spawn children with CreateChild while using DoSomeWork. Ideally all other members should not be visible. (that includes Child ctor) –  clearpath Jan 13 '12 at 12:31
    
I have updated my answer. –  Groo Jan 13 '12 at 12:53

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, you can make it protected. That way your derived class will still have access to it and be able to override it, but it won't be allowed publicly.

Good thinking, this is exactly the way to do it: override as little as possible and hide as much as possible.

- Edit -

Since this is probably a simplified example of what you are actually doing, I can only provide a guess to what these methods do, but here it goes.

I have a feeling that Calculate method might not belong to your Base class. It looks like it provides an auxiliary calculation result used by DoSomeWork. Inheritance is usually used when your base class has some common calculation to "offer" to derived classes, so that you don't have to repeat yourself.

For example, let's say that your DoSomeWork method has some certain functionality that doesn't change, but requires an "external" calculation to be performed first. If you started by creating a simple separate interface for the external calculation:

interface ICalculator
{
    double Calculate();
}

You could define different implementations of this interface. You can start by creating a simple implementation (similar to your Root functionality):

class SimpleCalculator : ICalculator
{
    readonly double _value;
    public SimpleCalculator(double value)
    {
       _value = value;
    }

    public double Calculate()
    {
       return _value;
    }
}

And you could also easily wrap existing implementations inside more complex classes (similar to what CreateChild intends to do):

// for the rest of the world, this is an ICalculator like any other
class CalculatorWrapper : ICalculator
{ 
    readonly ICalculator _base;
    public CalculatorWrapper(ICalculator baseCalc)
    {
       _base = baseCalc;
    }

    public double Calculate()
    {
       double value = _base.Value; 
       return 2 * value;
    }
}

And then, your actual class needs to use this functionality to some intended "extra work":

interface MyWorker
{
    double DoSomeWork(int value);
}

class YourClass
{
    readonly ICalculator _calc; 
    readonly double _someOtherValue;

    public YourClass(ICalculator calc, double someOtherValue)
    {
       _calc = calc;
       _someOtherValue = someOtherValue;
    }

    public double DoSomeWork(int value)
    {
       // use whatever you get from your calc
       double externalValue = _calc.Calculate();

       // and do some "actual work"
       return _someOtherValue + value + externalValue;
    }
}

Or, you could pass the "calculator" to DoSomeWork on each call, as a parameter, and change the complex class to something like:

interface MyWorker
{
    double DoSomeWork(ICalculator calc, int value);
}

class YourClass
{
    public double DoSomeWork(ICalculator calc, int value)
    {
       // use whatever you get from your calc
       double externalValue = calc.Calculate();

       // and do some "actual work"
       return _someOtherValue + value;
    }
}
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+1 especially for the "good thinking" comment. Quite true, and worth pointing out. –  Jon Hanna Jan 13 '12 at 12:05

Let's remove the unnecessary cruft from your example:

public abstract class Base
{
    public abstract double Calculate();
}
public class Derived : Base
{
    private Base b;
    public override double Calculate()
    {
        double r = b.Calculate();
        // Perform additional calculations on r
        return r;
    }
}

The question is "does Calculate have to be public?"

Calculate cannot be private because private virtuals are illegal in C#.

Calculate cannot be protected because the call to b.Calculate() in Derived is illegal if b is not known at compile time to be an instance of Derived or better. (The reason being: protected members are accessible to subclasses; the object referenced by b might be of an entirely different subclass of Base, and Derived is not allowed to access a protected method of that class because Derived is not derived from it.)

Calculate could be internal, protected internal or public.

However, there is a way to make Calculate protected. If you want to do an end-run around the rule about the protected receiver being required to be of a more derived type then make the base class do the dirty work for you:

public abstract class Base
{
    protected static double Calculate(Base b) 
    { 
        // perfectly legal inside Base:
        return b.Calculate(); 
    }        
    protected abstract double Calculate();
}
public class Derived : Base
{
    private Base b;
    protected override double Calculate()
    {
        double r = Base.Calculate(b);
        // Perform additional calculations on r
        return r;
    }
}

Make sense?

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Yes, it does very much. But, although technically this would be the right answer, I am awarding answer to Groos solution, because it inspired improvements to my "architecture" –  clearpath Jan 16 '12 at 9:37

You can declare Calculate as protected, and it will only be accesible to extending classes.

It's the same concept as protected int _Value; - you have access to it in the current class and all its children, but not from the outside.

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It should not be public. It can be made protected.

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incorrect... you don't have to do PUBLIC... you can do PROTECTED which means that any child derived class can utilize the function, but its NOT visible to other controls outside of it.

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No you could make it protected

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You can eigther use protected (=only inside the class and in its inherited classes accessible) or internal (=only inside the same assembly accessible). See HERE.

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You could make it:

  1. protected - Only accessible to types that are derived from it.
  2. internal - Only accessible to types in the same assembly (or a strong-named assembly declared as allowed to see this assembly's internal types).
  3. protected internal- Allows both of the above; Derived types and other types in the same assembly can both access it.

.NET also has an access type that restricts something to having to be both a derived type AND in the same assembly, but C# doesn't support it (presumably because you can get by with internal in this case and it would be tricky thinking of a name that wasn't easily confused with protected internal).

In this case it should almost certainly be protected.

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