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I'm trying to create a method which checks if the Login (username and password) has a minimum of 6 charakters.

To realize that I created this method public void checkLoginData(final String username, final String password). In that method, I create to booleans (user and pass), with those I can create 4 different boolean-chains:

  • user: true pass: true
  • user: false pass: true
  • user: false pass: false
  • user: true pass: false

Now I'd like to do a switch/case request for each of them, but I don't get how to realize that...

If you ask why I need the switch, I just think I need it, because I'd like to do for every of those 4 boolean-chains, that it does/show something diffrent. Also I'd like to do this in a sexy-java-way not with tousands of diffrent 'ifs' :P, Please help!

Here's the code of the method:

public void checkLoginData(final String username, final String password){

    boolean user, pass;

    if (username.length() < 6){
        user = false;
    }else {
        user = true;
    }

    if (password.length() < 6){
        pass = false;
    }else {
        pass = true;
    }

    boolean[] logindaten = {user, pass};



}

Thx for the help in Advance!

Best Regards safari

share|improve this question
1  
What for do you need switch here? What do you want to achieve? –  Egor Jan 13 '12 at 12:24
    
I need for every of those boolean-chains that it does something diffrent. because of that i'd like to do this with a switch. But I don't get it working –  safari Jan 13 '12 at 12:37
1  
Consider using an enum for each case to determine which current state you have instead of two doubles. So you can easily use switch/case then. –  ymene Jan 13 '12 at 12:48
    
than post it as awnser, because I don't get what you mean, sorry –  safari Jan 13 '12 at 12:49
    
just added an example with using an enum. –  ymene Jan 13 '12 at 13:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't switch over boolean[], only over integral types. To convert the booleans to an int, you could use a bit mask for the 2 booleans, like for example this:

int val = 0;
if (user) val |= 0x1;
if (pass) val |= 0x2;

switch (val) {
case 0: // Both too short
case 1: // User Ok, pass too short
case 2: // User too short, pass ok
case 3: // Both Ok
}
share|improve this answer
5  
Uggh ... anyone who thinks this is "sexy java" needs to go back to school. You need to read it carefully to be sure that it is correct ... and that's always a bad sign. –  Stephen C Jan 13 '12 at 13:07
    
Well, this is just a way how to do it with switch. I personally would implement it using an if / else if chain –  king_nak Jan 13 '12 at 13:25
    
@StephenC it may not be sexy but it is a fast and reliable way to do it... Granted, you could have used an enum, but this is even faster. –  fge Jan 13 '12 at 13:34
2  
@fge - I don't think so. This way executes 2 if tests and a switch plus two |= statements. The simple way (nested ifs) is 2 if tests. Besides, 99.9% of the time the performance difference is irrelevant. –  Stephen C Jan 13 '12 at 16:20

Basically there is no simpler way than this, and no way to do it in significantly less lines of code.

if (username.length() < 6){
    if (password.length() < 6){
        // do case 1
    } else {
        // do case 2
    }
} else {
    if (password.length() < 6){
        // do case 3
    } else {
        // do case 4
    }
}

To my mind, that makes this the best solution.

Also I'd like to do this in a sexy-java-way not with tousands of diffrent 'ifs'

If by "sexy-java-way" you mean "clever" or "obscure", then there are other ways to do it. But they certainly don't make the code easier to read / more maintainable.

By the way, the above involves only 3 ... that's right THREE ... if statements.


... but id like to have it more celver to impress my boss ;)

Seriously, if I was your boss and you wrote code like that, I'd be UN- impressed. Any boss who thinks you are clever for writing obscure and unmaintainable code is clueless.

share|improve this answer
    
yes I know i had it exactly like this before, but id like to have it more celver to impress my boss ;) because I'm still learning all this java and android stuff! Anyway! Thx man! +1. Because of your funny comment :P –  safari Jan 13 '12 at 13:06

Guess thats how I would solve it with enums:

public class LoginController
{
  private void login( String username, String password )
  {
    LoginState state = determineLoginState( username, password );

    switch ( state )
    {
      case LOGIN_OK:
        //Do Something
        break;
      case USERNAME_FALSE:
        //Do Something
        break;
      case PASSWORD_FALSE:
        //Do Something
        break;
      case BOTH_FALSE:
        //Do Something
        break;
    }

  }

  private LoginState determineLoginState( String username, String password )
  {
    final boolean checkUsername = checkUsername( username );
    final boolean checkPassword = checkPassword( password );

    if ( checkUsername && checkPassword )
      return LoginState.LOGIN_OK;

    if ( !checkUsername && checkPassword )
      return LoginState.USERNAME_FALSE;

    if ( checkUsername && !checkPassword )
      return LoginState.PASSWORD_FALSE;

    if ( !checkUsername && !checkPassword )
      return LoginState.BOTH_FALSE;

    throw new AuthenticationException();
  }

  protected boolean checkUsername( String username )
  {
    return username.length() > 6;
  }

  protected boolean checkPassword( String password )
  {
    return password.length() > 6;
  }

  private enum LoginState
  {
    LOGIN_OK, USERNAME_FALSE, PASSWORD_FALSE, BOTH_FALSE;
  }

  public class AuthenticationException extends RuntimeException
  {

  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i did it an otherway. Thx for your help anyways! –  safari Jan 13 '12 at 13:16

If you really want a "sexy-java-way" (but that depends what you understand as such) you can do something like (Java 7 required):

boolean user, pass;

switch (user + "-" + pass) {
    case "false-false":
        ...
    case "false-true":
        ...
    case "true-false":
        ...
    case "true-true":
        ...
    default:
        throw new RuntimeException(
            "something strange happening here, user: " + user + ",pass: " + pass);
}

but I would prefer to do just 2 distinct checks each with his owns message, the message being joined for presentation. (and not sure if that could be considered "sexy-java-way", more like a 'workaround')

share|improve this answer
    
this one looks also really great!! +1 and thx! –  safari Jan 16 '12 at 7:37
if (user) {
    if (pass) {
        // user = true, pass = true
    } else {
        // user = true, pass = false
    }
} else {
    if (pass) {
        // user = false, pass = true
    } else {
        // user = false, pass = false
    }
}

Or

int case = user ? (pass ? 1 : 2) : (pass ? 3: 4);

switch (case) {  
  case 1:
    System.out.println(" user = true, pass = true ");
    break;
  case 2:
    System.out.println(" user = true, pass = false ");
    break;
  case 3:
    System.out.println(" user = false, pass = true ");
    break;
  case 4:
    System.out.println(" user = false, pass = false ");
    break;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh my god. Not enough code! Too simple! –  4ndrew Jan 13 '12 at 12:30
    
@safari If you have just 4 combinations, first one is fine. Tried the same using switch, check it out. –  Vaandu Jan 13 '12 at 12:52
    
@4ndrew I just answered the question simply! –  Vaandu Jan 13 '12 at 12:52
    
@downvoter - care to explain? –  Vaandu Jan 13 '12 at 12:54

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