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I have this function compute an equivalence class

let eq_class m i =
  let column = m.(i)
  and set = ref [] in
  Array.iteri begin fun j l ->
    if j = i || column.(j) && m.(j).(i) then
      set := j :: !set else ignore l
  end column;
  !set;;

and this function to collect all the classes are equivalence

let eq_classes m =
  let classes = ref [] in
  Array.iteri begin fun e _ ->
    if not (List.exists (List.mem e) !classes) then
      classes := eq_class m e :: !classes
  end m;
  !classes;;

I have this function to compare two equivalence classes:

let cmp_classes m c c' = if c = c' then 0 else
  match c, c' with
    | i :: _, j :: _ -> if m.(i).(j) then 1 else -1
    | _ -> assert false

After I used this function to sort it by using List.sort

let sort_eq_classes m = List.sort (cmp_classes m);;

My matrix is an boolean matrix, and I computed it with transitive closure.

let transClosure m =
  let n = Array.length m in
  for k = 0 to n - 1 do
    let mk = m.(k) in
    for i = 0 to n - 1 do
      let mi = m.(i) in
      for j = 0 to n - 1 do
    mi.(j) <- max mi.(j) (min mi.(k) mk.(j))
      done;
    done;
  done;
  m;;

let tc = transClosure matrix
let eq = eq_classes tc
let sort_eq = sort_eq_classes tc eq

I tested with many counter example to test all these functions, for example with the graph (matrix)

EDIT

matrix:

 a <-> b  c <-> d
 |          
 v          
 e

matrix_2:

a <-> b -> e -> f
|          |
v          v
h <------- g 
|          |
v          v  
u          k    

I input the boolean matrix:

    let matrix =
   [|
   [|false; true; false; false; false|];
   [|true; false; false; false; false|];
   [|false; false; false; true; false|];
   [|false; false; true; false; false|];
   [|false; false; false; false; false|];
   |];;

let matrix_2 =
    [|
    [| false; false; false; false; false; false; false; false |];
    [| false; false; false; false; false; false; false; false |];
    [| false; false; false; true; false; false; true; false |];
    [| false; false; true; false; true; false; false; false |];
    [| true; false; false; false; false; true; false; false |];
    [| false; true; false; false; false; false; true; false |];
    [| false; false; false; false; false; false; false; true |];
    [| false; false; false; false; false; false; false; false |];
    |]

output of matrix 1: equivalence classes: e d c b a

sort equivalence classes: e d c b a

output of matrix 2: equivalence classes: u h g e b a k f

sort equivalence classes : u h k g f e b a

And the result is correct order like I expected. But when I test it with my data, which is an xsds data, more complicated depended relations. It output for me a wrong order. I had test with function transform to boolean matrix from xsds, and tested transitive closure, it is correct. So I think may be their is some bugs in my functions, (eq_class) or (cmp_classes).

Could you please help me to see what wrong in these code?

share|improve this question
1  
It's extremely difficult to debug if you don't provide a short counterexample. –  pad Jan 13 '12 at 16:00
    
I edited and put an short example. Thanks –  Quyen Jan 14 '12 at 2:05
    
I meant an example which demonstrates wrong results from your code. –  pad Jan 14 '12 at 8:40
    
All the example I tested with these code is correct. But when I apply it to the data I support to test, it does not give me the correct order. –  Quyen Jan 14 '12 at 10:53
1  
Try to check the conversion from xsds trees to matrices; it could be incorrect. Furthermore, be careful with some of your functions having side effects. When you call let tc = transClosure matrix, tc is just an alias to matrix which has been changed. –  pad Jan 14 '12 at 14:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is in cmp_classes function.

From your source code:

(* We check that if two elements are in the same equivalence class they are
   equal (0); if they have a path from i to j then i < j (-1)
   otherwise i > j (1). We assumes that: each equivalence class only
   appears once and each equivalence class contains at least one
   element. *)

let cmp_classes m c c' = if c = c' then 0 else
  match c, c' with
    | i :: _, j :: _ -> if m.(i).(j) then 1 else -1
    | _ -> assert false

Obviously, your code doesn't fulfill your requirement. Several errors could be mentioned:

  1. If m.(i).(j) = true, you don't compare between i and j at all.
  2. If m.(i).(j) = false, you suppose to compare other combinations than i and j, but here you wrongly returns -1.
  3. You only compare using the heads of c and c' and ignore other elements while you suppose to use any pair of elements in two lists before reaching a conclusion.

In your small examples, you got correct results because equivalence classes often have one element. Since they are collected in the order that there is no path from former ones to later ones, your returning of -1 is fortunately correct. It's no longer the case with arbitrary input from xsd trees.

It's not difficult to fix the function if you can define it clearly. Now I still don't know the order of two equivalence classes without any path connecting them together ({a,b} and {c, d} classes in matrix).

In order that you can test your fix more easily, this is a small example which will produce a wrong order:

 a <-> b  c <-> d
 ^     ^  ^     ^
 |     |  |     |
 e     e  e     e
share|improve this answer
    
let cmp_classes m c c' = match c, c' with | i :: _, j :: _ -> if i = j then 0 else if i >= j then 1 else -1 | _ -> assert false I tested with the example you give to me, it give a right order with this compares. I applied it to the xsds data. It still not return a right order. I tried to write a function checking with your suggestion at 1) 2) and 3),and it turn out to my function I give here. –  Quyen Jan 16 '12 at 3:25
    
Your new function is obviously wrong. Why do you compare them when there's maybe no path from i to j (m.(i).(j) = false)? Think about my suggestions; I couldn't help you more than this. –  pad Jan 16 '12 at 7:31
    
let cmp_classes m c c' = match c, c' with | i :: _ , j :: _ -> if m.(i).(j) = true then compare i j else if m.(i).(j) = false then .... | _ -> assert false I don't understand about suggestion 2) support to compare another combination than i and j. I am thinking about c c', but it has not giving me a right answer. –  Quyen Jan 16 '12 at 8:54
1  
Try to compare every element of c with every element of c' (NOT JUST COMPARING THEIR HEADS). If these elements are comparable at some point, return there. Otherwise, there is no path from an element of c to an element of c'; throw an exception. –  pad Jan 16 '12 at 9:11
    
I tried to write another function to compare i and j and tested with a small example above, it gave me correct order but when I run it with my data, it gives the same order like before. Could you please help me? let cmp_classes m i j = if i = j then 0 else if m.(i).(j) then if m.(j).(i) then 0 else 1 else if m.(j).(i) then 0 else -1 –  Quyen Feb 15 '12 at 7:14

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