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I have postorder array of a BST tree size n how do i show there is only one BST that can be constructed form it. I know I can rebuild the tree if I add nodes from right to left but how do I show there is only one right tree?

I have tried saying there are two possible trees and tried showing it is not possible but got stuck

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1 Answer 1

It is possible only because it is a BST. Recall that for a Binary tree to be a valid Binary Search Tree:

-Left subtrees' values must be less than root's value
-Right subtrees' values must be greater than root's value
-Left and right subtrees must be valid binary search trees.

Because we know this must be the case, we can reconstruct the tree given a list of elements in post-order. The last element in the array (at pos n), is the root. Find the right-most element bigger than the root, and that's the root's first right-subtree. Find the element closest to the end of the array that is smaller than the root, and that's the left element. Recursively apply this to get the tree.

Example:

[8,10,9,12,11]

      11 <----root

9 is the right-most number smaller than 11, so it's the left sub-tree

  11
 /
/  

9

and 12 is the right-most element bigger than 11, so

    11
   /  \
  /    \
 9      12

Now, our root is 9, and the right-most number smaller than 9 is 8, so tree becomes

       11
      /  \
     /    \
    9      12
   / \ 
  8

And the next number bigger than 9 is 10, so the final tree is

       11
      /  \
     /    \
    9      12
   / \ 
  8   10

Try and convince yourself that there are other possible valid binary search trees with these points, but not ones that produce identical output on a post-order traversal.

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1  
Or, put another way: Any PostOrderTraversal (POT) of a BST must be able to split into 3 parts: the root at the end, and the rest into the left subtree (all values < root) and the right subtree (> root), and that is the ONLY way it can be split (due to properties of BST & POT). This applies recursively; hence, there can be only one BST for any POT. –  Scott Hunter Jan 13 '12 at 19:02
    
@ScottHunter well said. –  prelic Jan 14 '12 at 2:11

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