Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an array of arrays that I want to sort. Each element of array A is an array with 3 elements. Array A looks like:

my @A = ([2,3,1], [1,2,3], [1,0,2], [3,1,2], [2,2,4]);

I want to sort A in ascending order. When comparing 2 elements, the first number is used. If there is a tie, the second number is used, and then the third number.

Here is my code. I use a function 'cmpfunc' to compare 2 elements.

sub cmpfunc {
    return ($a->[0] <=> $b->[0]) or 
           ($a->[1] <=> $b->[1]) or
           ($a->[2] <=> $b->[2]);
}
my @B = sort cmpfunc @A;
print "Result:\n";
for my $element (@B) {
    print join(",", @{$element}) . "\n";
}

Result:

1,2,3
1,0,2
2,3,1
2,2,4
3,1,2

The result is somewhat sorted, but not correct. What I expect is:

1,0,2
1,2,3
2,2,4
2,3,1
3,1,2

Is there any error in my comparison function? The strange thing is, when I put the comparison code in block, the result is correctly sorted.

my @C = sort { ($a->[0] <=> $b->[0]) or 
               ($a->[1] <=> $b->[1]) or
               ($a->[2] <=> $b->[2]) } @A;
share|improve this question
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/1512547 –  mob Jan 13 '12 at 15:49
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You are executing

return ($a->[0] <=> $b->[0])

which returns before it gets to any of the "or" clauses.

Either remove the "return" keyword, or add paranthesis around the entire arg list for return:

sub cmpfunc {
    return(($a->[0] <=> $b->[0]) or
           ($a->[1] <=> $b->[1]) or
           ($a->[2] <=> $b->[2]));
}
share|improve this answer
7  
OR use the tighter-binding or: ||. –  Axeman Jan 13 '12 at 14:21
add comment

The reason you observe this "wrong" behavior is the priority of or operator, the lowest possible. In this situation it means that

return ($a->[0] <=> $b->[0]) or 
       ($a->[1] <=> $b->[1]) or
       ($a->[2] <=> $b->[2]);

is interpreted as OR-ing

return ($a->[0] <=> $b->[0])

and the rest of the line -- nonsense in this case, as return never returns. :)

So you should use C's OR:

return ($a->[0] <=> $b->[0]) || 
       ($a->[1] <=> $b->[1]) ||
       ($a->[2] <=> $b->[2]);
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, || is a good alternative. –  jftsai Jan 13 '12 at 13:10
add comment

Needs more parentheses:

sub cmpfunc {
    return (($a->[0] <=> $b->[0]) or
            ($a->[1] <=> $b->[1]) or
            ($a->[2] <=> $b->[2]));
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
    sub cmpfunc {
    return ($a->[0] <=> $b->[0]) or 
           ($a->[1] <=> $b->[1]) or
           ($a->[2] <=> $b->[2]);
}

you can delete 'return' here.

    sub cmpfunc {
     ($a->[0] <=> $b->[0]) or 
     ($a->[1] <=> $b->[1]) or
     ($a->[2] <=> $b->[2]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
It will still return the first statement that evaluates true. –  Leonardo Herrera Jan 13 '12 at 13:20
1  
@LeonardoHerrera It is supposed to do that. –  TLP Jan 13 '12 at 13:30
    
@TLP - doh, you're right. –  Leonardo Herrera Jan 13 '12 at 13:49
    
+1 because I had no idea "return" wasn't needed in Perl ;) –  Izkata Jan 13 '12 at 19:00
add comment

An alternative solution to Daniel's:

sub cmpfunc {
    return ($a->[0] <=> $b->[0]) ||
           ($a->[1] <=> $b->[1]) ||
           ($a->[2] <=> $b->[2]);
}

The problem with or this case is that it has lower precedence than assignment, so your function only returns the result of ($a->[0] <=> $b->[0]), which is -1, 0 or 1 if the left hand side is numerically lower than, equal to or larger than the right hand side respectively. || has higher precedence, so the entire boolean expression is evaluated before returning. As mentioned, you can wrap the expression in parentheses if you prefer that to ||. I personally don't.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, it returns only the first comparison, no matter what it returns. Try sub a { return 0 or die "Ough" }. –  TLP Jan 13 '12 at 13:34
    
@TLP: Thanks for pointing that out. –  flesk Jan 13 '12 at 19:01
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.