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I needed to make my own label to hold some value, that is diferent from the value displayed to user

public class LabelBean : Label {
  private string value;

  public LabelBean(string text = "", string value = ""): base() {
    base.Text = text;
    this.value = value;
  }

  public string Value {
    get { return value; }
    set { this.value = value; }
  }
}

but now id in the form constructor I replace the control with my class

this.lbAttributeType = new LabelBean();

and later after the form is created, but before it is shown I set the text through setter

(this.lbAttributeType as LabelBean).Value = value;
this.lbAttributeType.Text = Transform(value);

but in the form I have always "label1" text... what is wrong with it? thanks

UPDATE

I added the solution here to find it easier:

public class MyLabel : Label {

    public MyLabel()
      : base() {
    }

    public string Value {
      set {
        this.Text = value;
      }
    }
  }

and the form with Widnows.Forms.Label label1 control

public partial class Form1 : Form {

    public Form1() {
      InitializeComponent();
      this.Controls.Remove(this.label1);
      this.label1 = new MyLabel();
      this.Controls.Add(this.label1);
      (this.label1 as MyLabel).Value = "oh";
    }
  }

the bug was in the Controls.Remove and Controls.Add, thanks all for their time :)

share|improve this question
1  
You shouldn't need to cast in order to set the property ((this.lbAttributeType as LabelBean).Value = value;). If you have to, then there is something wrong with your code. Casts hide errors, not fix them. –  Cody Gray Jan 13 '12 at 13:53
    
As Cody said, lbAttributeType should actually be of LabelBean type. –  Groo Jan 13 '12 at 13:58
    
I'd guess you put the code in the constructor before the InitializeComponent() call. And that you see a first chance exception in the Output window. –  Hans Passant Jan 13 '12 at 14:00
    
no the initialization comes first, @CodyGray - why? the label is classic winforms Label and in that I put my LableBean... than the casting is neccessery couse in the label is actualy the labelbean object.. this is polymorfism isnt it? –  Zavael Jan 13 '12 at 14:43
    
No, that's not what polymorphism is. The label isn't a WinForms Label, it's your custom label. But it's obviously not being defined as an object of that type, or else you wouldn't have to cast it. And since it's not declared as an object of that type, it doesn't have those properties. –  Cody Gray Jan 13 '12 at 15:18
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I agree with WoLfulus and Andreas Zoltan and would add a symmetrical functionality to Text if there exists a unambiguous reverse transformation:

public string Value
{
    get { return value; }
    set
    {
        if (this.value != value) {
            this.value = value;
            this.Text = Transform(value);
        }
    }
}

public override string Text
{
    get { return base.Text; }
    set
    {
        if (base.Text != value) {
            base.Text = value;
            this.value = TransformBack(value);
        }
    }
}

Note the if checks in order to avoid an endless recursion.


EDIT:

Assigning your label to lbAttributeType is not enough. You must remove the old label from the Controls collection before the assignment and re-add it after the assignment.

this.Controls.Remove(lbAttributeType);  // Remove old label
this.lbAttributeType = new LabelBean(); 
this.Controls.Add(lbAttributeType); // Add new label

Your form was still displaying the old label! Why did I not see it earlier?

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice touch with the endless recursion check. –  Andras Zoltan Jan 13 '12 at 14:54
    
+1 for the recursion check :) but not solved my problem –  Zavael Jan 13 '12 at 15:11
    
We forgot the Controls collection! See my edit. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 13 '12 at 15:28
    
+1 Well done Olivier - controls collection of course - @Zavael I strongly suggest you drag-drop the control using the toolbox, after adding a default constructor, though - it would solve all these problems. –  Andras Zoltan Jan 13 '12 at 15:49
    
Yes, or you can open MyForm.designer.cs and replace Label by LabelBean where appropriate and then remove the code in the constructor. This replaces the normal label with your user control without having to alter your form in the designer. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 13 '12 at 16:05
show 2 more comments

My guess is because, since you're doing the work in the constructor, the InitializeComponent code, automatically generated by the designer, is overwriting the control instance, as it's most likely called after your initialisation.

If the class is part of the project, you will find it on the toolbox; meaning you can simply drag and drop your new control on the form in place of the existing one - this is what you should do.

This ensures that the designer-generated property is of your LabelBean type, and not simply Label.

Also - you should consider changing your Value setter as demonstrated by WoLfulus (+1 there)

Update

In response to the comment you put on WoLfulus' answer - here's a couple of alternatives:

1) If the form is the 'clever' bit here - consider just writing a helper method in it, and setting the value of the label through it, leveraging the Tag property:

public void SetLabelBean(Label target, string value)
{
  Label.Tag = value;
  Label.Text = Transform(value);
}

public string GetLabelBean(Label target)
{
  return target.Tag as string;
}

2) Continue using your sub-classed LabelBean type (adding it via the designer as I've already mentioned) - but use an abstraction to give it access to the form's Transform method:

public interface ITransformProvider
{
  string Transform(string);
}

Make your form class implement this interface, with the Transform method you elude to.

Now, in your LabelBean class:

public ITransformProvider Transformer
{
  get{
    //searches up the control hierarchy to find the first ITransformProvider.
    //should be the form, but also allows you to use your own container controls
    //to change within the form.  The algorithm could be improved by caching the
    //result, invalidating it if the control is moved to another container of course.
    var parent = Parent;
    ITransformProvider provider = parent as ITransformProvider;
    while(provider == null){
      parent = parent.Parent;
      provider = parent as ITransformProvider;
    }
    return provider;
  }
}

And then, finally, using WoLfulus' code, but slightly changed, you can do this:

public string Value          
{         
  get          
  {          
    return value;          
  }         
  set          
  {          
    this.value = value; 
    var transformer = Transformer;
    if(transformer != null) this.Text = transformer.Transform(value);
  }         
}  

That, I think, addresses your issues with that answer.

share|improve this answer
    
the creation of the LabelBean is after the initializeComponent, so it shouldnt by the case, but with the tool draging on the form i was unsuccesful, it throw an error on me with missingMethodException: Constructor on type LabelBean not found' at System.Runtipe.CreateInstanceImpl(Bindingflags.... etc it is a long stacktrace... could that be the problem? –  Zavael Jan 13 '12 at 14:39
    
@Zavael - You need to ensure that there is a default constructor on your control type. Also, see my updated answer which provides a version that strikes a balance between the subclassed control and the Transform code needing to be in the form. –  Andras Zoltan Jan 13 '12 at 14:49
    
as i understanded the updated version, the first one is the same assigning of transfomed value to the label.Text value and in the second i need to call transform in the label class, whitch i cant, because the label class can not fill all the parameters in the transform funcion... I am really surprised that simple assigning of text value in subclass is not working... but thanks for your time, i tried a simpler project with simple transform function for wolfulus and it is not working either –  Zavael Jan 13 '12 at 15:19
    
@Zavael - the second solution allows you to hide the true nature of your Transform operation behind an interface that you can implement in the form, thus hiding the complexity from the label. This also allows you to change the implementation according to each form, and even (because the control tree is walked) according to the physical structure of the form and any containers it has. That's polymorphism :) –  Andras Zoltan Jan 13 '12 at 15:37
    
all right, i will try it if Wolfs will not work, +1 for your time and effort for now, thanks a lot :) –  Zavael Jan 13 '12 at 19:26
add comment

Try this:

  1. Create a new delegate outside the label class:

    public delegate string LabelFormatDelegate( string val );
    
  2. Add this to your label class:

    public LabelFormatDelegate ValueFormatter = null;
    
    public string Value 
    {
        get 
        { 
            return value; 
        }
        set 
        { 
            this.value = value; 
            if (this.ValueFormatter != null)
            {
                this.Text = this.ValueFormatter(value); // change the label here
            }
            else
            {
                this.Text = value;
            }
        }
    }
    
  3. Place a new common label to your form (lets name it "label1")

  4. Goto to Form1.Designer.cs and search for "label1" declaration.

  5. Rename the "Label" type to your own label type (Ex: "MyLabel")

  6. Change the initialization code of label on InitializeComponent function on designer code to match the new type "MyLabel"

    Example:

    this.label1 = new Label();
    

    Change to:

    this.label1 = new MyLabel();
    
  7. In the Form_Load event, specify the format function:

    this.label1.ValueFormatter = new LabelFormatDelegate(this.Transform);
    

Notes: You'll need to remove the "Text" setter call too from here:

(this.lbAttributeType as LabelBean).Value = value;
// this.lbAttributeType.Text = Transform(value);

This will keep your value/text in sync but remember not to set "Text" property by hand.

share|improve this answer
    
dont want to chain the label class with transform function, as the funcion is a bit more complicated with more parameters, that are not known in the label class, only on the form class, either way a dont see the difference, but thanks –  Zavael Jan 13 '12 at 14:34
    
@Zavael - the difference is that this at least ensures that Text is automatically kept in sync with your Value. If the form has all the knowledge, then encapsulating this functionality in a standalone control type might not be suitable. –  Andras Zoltan Jan 13 '12 at 14:37
    
@Zavael You can set a callback delegate for the format function if you want. This will make the label reusable for any "formatted" texts that depends on "value". By looking at your code we can't do anything else than just guessing the problem beucase your code seems "right". –  WoLfulus Jan 13 '12 at 14:41
    
@Zavael I've added the "callback" example too. I've not tested the code but it should work as expected. –  WoLfulus Jan 13 '12 at 14:47
1  
@Zavael it is called "best" answer, not first, neither faster. Oliver and Andras gave you good answers too, but keep that in mind next time. –  WoLfulus Jan 16 '12 at 18:23
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